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    Into the Darkness: How illegal surveillance is undermining open government reforms in Latin America

Into the Darkness: How illegal surveillance is undermining open government reforms in Latin America

In Latin America, the increasing scale of illegal surveillance – enabled by governments’ purchases of surveillance and hacking software – is raising urgent questions about its impact on civil rights. In this post, Fabrizio Scrollini – LSE graduate and chair of Datysoc (a project exploring surveillance, privacy and cybersecurity in the digital age) – illustrates which points need to […]

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    Public service media funding in Ireland faces continuing challenges

Public service media funding in Ireland faces continuing challenges

Ireland’s main public service broadcaster RTÉ is facing serious challenges to its funding, and the sustainability of funding for public service media in the country is in question. In this post Phil Ramsey, School of Communication and Media at Ulster University, illustrates how the Irish Government might have missed opportunities to rectify the issues by avoiding introducing a replacement […]

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    What’s the point of “digital education”? Education, citizenship and sustainable digital lives

What’s the point of “digital education”? Education, citizenship and sustainable digital lives

Digitalization is transforming the possibilities of education, from initiatives to deliver basic education in the global south to programmes at the world’s leading teaching universities. Following the third meeting in LSE’s Digital Life series in June, Visiting Fellows Jonny Shipp and Dr Ioanna Noula discuss how education is responding to digitalization. They argue that relevant skills and a familiarity […]

The Intimate (Self-)Regulation of Big Tech

Turkey regularly blocks non-heterosexual websites, the UK bans online pornographic content considered as ‘obscene’ and Facebook has a problem with female nipples. The regulation of sexual content – or content that is deemed to be of sexual nature – is a regular feature of internet governance and self-regulation of platforms and apps. In this post Lukasz Szulc, LSE Marie […]

The state of Hungarian media: Endgame

Hungary has been experiencing significant constitutional and institutional changes in the last seven years as Viktor Orban and his ruling party Fidesz cemented their political power by capturing the constitutional court and other key institutions. In parallel to the political capture of democratic institutions, media ownership became more and more concentrated in the hands of Orban and his close […]

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    The Press Problem: How to Avoid Hate When Discussing Muslim Affairs

The Press Problem: How to Avoid Hate When Discussing Muslim Affairs

The UK press regulator IPSO has received hundreds of complaints concerning a column in the British newspaper ‘The Sun’ in which the phrase “the Muslim Problem” – by many perceived as a reference to the Nazi terminology “the Jewish Problem” – was used. In this post Aidan White, the Director of the Ethical Journalism Network (EJN), illustrates this controversy […]

Doxing is a toxic practice – no matter who is targeted

The events in the US city of Charlottesville where a far-right protest turned violent raise a multitude of questions – some of which touch upon media ethics and media regulation. Especially the practice of ‘doxing’ – sharing individuals’ personal information online to cause them harm – has significant ethical and regulatory ramifications. In this post David Brake, LSE graduate […]

The regulatory future of algorithms

Although they are often used to automate or streamline processes, algorithms are far from being the objective tool that many make them out to be. In this post, Jędrzej Niklas from the LSE looks at the negative effects of algorithms and how policy attempts (or will attempt) to mitigate those effects.

Automated decisions systems are becoming more and more common. […]

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    Children’s privacy rights are prominent in the Data Protection Bill but there’s many a slip…

Children’s privacy rights are prominent in the Data Protection Bill but there’s many a slip…

Last week, the UK government announced its plans for a new Data Protection Bill that would give people “more control over their personal data” and enable them to be be “better protected in the digital age.” LSE’s Sonia Livingstone looks the implications of the Bill for child rights and highlights areas that might need more work. 

Unexpectedly for many interested […]

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    The evolving conversation around fake news and potential solutions

The evolving conversation around fake news and potential solutions

Fake news, its causes and what to do about are some of the key issues that we plan to address as part of the LSE Commission on Truth, Trust and Technology that we will launch later this year. The Commission will examine the wider crisis in the quality and credibility of information in the digital age. Fake news isn’t new, […]