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The state of Hungarian media: Endgame

Hungary has been experiencing significant constitutional and institutional changes in the last seven years as Viktor Orban and his ruling party Fidesz cemented their political power by capturing the constitutional court and other key institutions. In parallel to the political capture of democratic institutions, media ownership became more and more concentrated in the hands of Orban and his close […]

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    The Press Problem: How to Avoid Hate When Discussing Muslim Affairs

The Press Problem: How to Avoid Hate When Discussing Muslim Affairs

The UK press regulator IPSO has received hundreds of complaints concerning a column in the British newspaper ‘The Sun’ in which the phrase “the Muslim Problem” – by many perceived as a reference to the Nazi terminology “the Jewish Problem” – was used. In this post Aidan White, the Director of the Ethical Journalism Network (EJN), illustrates this controversy […]

Doxing is a toxic practice – no matter who is targeted

The events in the US city of Charlottesville where a far-right protest turned violent raise a multitude of questions – some of which touch upon media ethics and media regulation. Especially the practice of ‘doxing’ – sharing individuals’ personal information online to cause them harm – has significant ethical and regulatory ramifications. In this post David Brake, LSE graduate […]

The regulatory future of algorithms

Although they are often used to automate or streamline processes, algorithms are far from being the objective tool that many make them out to be. In this post, Jędrzej Niklas from the LSE looks at the negative effects of algorithms and how policy attempts (or will attempt) to mitigate those effects.

Automated decisions systems are becoming more and more common. […]

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    Children’s privacy rights are prominent in the Data Protection Bill but there’s many a slip…

Children’s privacy rights are prominent in the Data Protection Bill but there’s many a slip…

Last week, the UK government announced its plans for a new Data Protection Bill that would give people “more control over their personal data” and enable them to be be “better protected in the digital age.” LSE’s Sonia Livingstone looks the implications of the Bill for child rights and highlights areas that might need more work. 

Unexpectedly for many interested […]

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    The evolving conversation around fake news and potential solutions

The evolving conversation around fake news and potential solutions

Fake news, its causes and what to do about are some of the key issues that we plan to address as part of the LSE Commission on Truth, Trust and Technology that we will launch later this year. The Commission will examine the wider crisis in the quality and credibility of information in the digital age. Fake news isn’t new, […]

The Great Data Protection Rebranding Exercise

During the recent announcement of a new Data Protection Bill by the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS),  the Minister for Digital – Matt Hancock – stated that the bill would “give us one of the most robust, yet dynamic, sets of data laws in the world.” In this post, Orla Lynskey, Assistant Professor of Law […]

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    If children don’t know an ad from information, how can they grasp how companies use their personal data?

If children don’t know an ad from information, how can they grasp how companies use their personal data?

All EU member states have until May 2018 to incorporate the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) into British law. Article 8 states that, unless member states decide otherwise, children under the age of 16 years old will require parental permission to use “information society services”, which refers to most online resources. Most provisions of the GDPR are to improve […]

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    Why the end of net neutrality is not the end of the open internet

Why the end of net neutrality is not the end of the open internet

The public consultation period on the US Federal Communications Commission’s proposal to repeal net neutrality, the principle that all traffic on the Internet should be treated the same, ends today, July 17. With 8.5 million comments, this has been by far the most widely debated policy issue in FCC’s history. The rules under consideration for repeal were adopted only […]

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    Will Karen Bradley Refer SKY-FOX to the Competition and Markets Authority?

Will Karen Bradley Refer SKY-FOX to the Competition and Markets Authority?

Anyone with evidence about whether the proposed Sky-Fox merger will operate against the public interest had until Friday 14 July to submit it to the Department of Culture, Media and Sport. If nothing changes, argues Damian Tambini, Bradley will be tempted to take advantage of parliamentary recess and approve the deal.

[The text of this article has been corrected in […]