Filtering and Censorship

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    Jeopardising the effectiveness of journalism in South East Europe: The role of extra-legal policy mechanisms

Jeopardising the effectiveness of journalism in South East Europe: The role of extra-legal policy mechanisms

A range of extra-legal policy mechanisms (policy-relevant actions outside of the scope of law) are used by those in power to prevent journalists from fulfilling their watchdog role in society. In this post, Chiara Sighele from Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso Transeuropa, provides examples from countries of South East Europe (SEE) where extra-legal policy mechanisms are deployed to stifle journalism.

There […]

How advertising fuels fake news

In this second post in our blog series on “fake news”, Damian Tambini illustrates the underlying structures of the online advertising industry that make fake news lucrative.

One of the questions in the UK Parliament’s inquiry into “fake news” asks: “Have changes in the selling and placing of advertising encouraged the growth of fake news, for example by making it […]

The hidden human labour behind search engine algorithms

Everybody knows that search engines use algorithms, but few know how these work and who builds them. Paško Bilić, Research Associate at the Institute for Development and International Relations in Zagreb, Croatia, writes here about the layers of human labour behind Google’s algorithms and their implications for search neutrality. His post is based on a paper published in Big […]

How has media policy responded to fake news?

This is the first post in our blog series on “fake news”. In this series of posts, we provide an overview of the issue of “fake news” and what can be done about it.

Last week, the UK House of Commons Culture, Media and Sport Committee  launched an inquiry into ‘fake news’ which the Committee chair describes as a “threat […]

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    How the UK passed the most invasive surveillance law in democratic history

How the UK passed the most invasive surveillance law in democratic history

The Investigatory Powers Bill was recently passed by both Houses of the UK parliament and is set to become law, likely by the end of the year. Paul Bernal, Lecturer in Information Technology, Intellectual Property and Media Law, University of East Anglia, looks at the implications of the bill.

You might not have noticed thanks to world events, but the […]

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    Liability and responsibility: new challenges for Internet intermediaries

Liability and responsibility: new challenges for Internet intermediaries

Monica Horten, a visiting fellow at the LSE, argues for clarification on proposals regarding Internet intermediaries’ liability for content, and for an appropriate balance to be struck between the different interests involved. This post is based on her paper for the Center for Democracy and Technology on Content ‘responsibility’: The looming cloud of uncertainty for internet intermediaries.

How might policy-makers […]

Facebook is a new breed of editor: a social editor

Facebook’s approach to allowing, censoring or prioritising content that appears in the news feed has recently been the focus of much attention, both media and governmental. Professor Natali Helberger of the Institute for Information Law at the University of Amsterdam argues that we need to seek to understand the new kind of editorial role that Facebook is playing, in […]

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    TTIP leaks: telecoms proposals threaten net neutrality & citizens’ rights

TTIP leaks: telecoms proposals threaten net neutrality & citizens’ rights

Policy analyst and LSE visiting fellow Monica Horten of Iptegrity.com reflects on the proposed joint EU-US rules for the telecommunications industry, according to a leak earlier this week by Greenpeace of documents related to the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.

Proposed joint EU-US rules for the telecommunications industry pose a threat to net neutrality and to citizens’ rights in general. Drafts leaked earlier […]

A very brief history of interception

Britain is in the process of legislating a new system of control over the interception of communication. The Investigatory Powers Bill, currently being debated in draft form, aims to give an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability to the use of government surveillance powers. In this ‘long read’ piece for the Media Policy Project, LSE PhD student Bernard Keenan […]

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    The LSE Law Department Contributes to the Surveillance Debate

The LSE Law Department Contributes to the Surveillance Debate

The draft Investigatory Powers Bill received considerable attention when it was published in late 2015. In this blog, Professor Andrew Murray from LSE’s Law Department, introduces a series of new LSE policy briefs, which aim to shed light on four key aspects of the draft Bill.

As I noted in my previous post, the UK Parliament is currently in the […]