Filtering and Censorship

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    The LSE Law Department Contributes to the Surveillance Debate

The LSE Law Department Contributes to the Surveillance Debate

The draft Investigatory Powers Bill received considerable attention when it was published in late 2015. In this blog, Professor Andrew Murray from LSE’s Law Department, introduces a series of new LSE policy briefs, which aim to shed light on four key aspects of the draft Bill.

As I noted in my previous post, the UK Parliament is currently in the […]

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    Some things old, some things new: A clause-by-clause review of the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill – Investigatory Powers Research Group

Some things old, some things new: A clause-by-clause review of the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill – Investigatory Powers Research Group

Following the publication of the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill in November 2015, the Investigatory Powers Research Group – which comprises academics and practitioners specialising in privacy, surveillance and freedom of expression issues – met at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies to discuss the detail and the main issues. The Group’s response is reproduced below.   

Fairly quickly it was […]

Finding Proportionality in Surveillance Laws

Andrew Murray is Professor of Law at London School of Economics and Political Science and the author of Information Technology Law: The Law and Society. In this post, he examines the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill which was published in November 2015. 

The United Kingdom Parliament is currently in the pre-legislative scrutiny phase of a new Investigatory Powers Bill, which aims to “consolidate existing […]

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    Surveillance and civil liberties: Interview with David Davis MP

Surveillance and civil liberties: Interview with David Davis MP

Yesterday’s publication of the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill marks an important moment in the ongoing debate about surveillance powers in the UK. The former Shadow Home Secretary David Davis MP is a long-time campaigner for civil liberties and has been highly critical of previous legislation, including the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act (DRIPA) which he challenged at the […]

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    Free speech in the chiller as police pounce on journalists and academics

Free speech in the chiller as police pounce on journalists and academics

John Jewell, Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University, argues that the seizure of materials from journalists and academics by police under UK anti-terror legislation represents a serious threat to free speech. In this post, he summarises the reaction to two recent high-profile cases, and argues that researchers of extremism should be allowed to get on with their jobs without interference from the […]

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    Privacy watchdog takes first step against those undermining right to be forgotten

Privacy watchdog takes first step against those undermining right to be forgotten

Eerke Boiten, Senior Lecturer, School of Computing and Director of Academic Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Research at University of Kent discusses the decision by the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office to ask Google to remove links to stories about right to be forgotten removals.

The UK’s data privacy watchdog has waded into the debate over the enforcement of the […]

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    Send in the robots: automated journalism and its potential impact on media pluralism (part 2)

Send in the robots: automated journalism and its potential impact on media pluralism (part 2)

In his previous post, Pieter-Jan Ombelet of the KU Leuven Interdisciplinary Centre for Law and ICT (ICRI-CIR) analysed automated journalism (also referred to as robotic reporting) as a potential solution to combat the diminution of investigative journalism. Here, he focuses on the future possibilities of robotic reporting in personalising specific news stories for each reader and assesses the potential […]

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    Internet freedom in Iran: attitudes to anonymity, privacy and FOI

Internet freedom in Iran: attitudes to anonymity, privacy and FOI

In the lead up to this year’s high level event to review the progress of the goals outlined at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), stakeholders gathered in Geneva for the WSIS forum on March 25. Kyle Bowen, researcher at Small Media, looks at some of the findings of his organisation’s latest report, which is based on […]

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    An Internet Bill of Rights? Pros and cons of the Italian way

An Internet Bill of Rights? Pros and cons of the Italian way

Last week, an Italian committee of politicians and experts announced its Declaration of Internet Rights, making Italy the first country to introduce an internet bill of rights. Oreste Pollicino, Professor of Comparative Public Law and Media Law at Bocconi University and Counsel of Portolano Cavallo Studio Legale, and Marco Bassini, PhD Researcher in Constitutional Law at the University of […]

Our top 10 blog posts so far this year

As you prepare to embark on (or return from) summer holidays, why not take a look at our most read blog posts so far this year? Here are some of the Media Policy Project Blog’s highlights from January to June 2015, covering children’s rights and digital safety, the European Audiovisual Media Services Directive and Digital Single Market Strategy, privacy […]