Filtering and Censorship

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    The Government’s Freedom of Information commission tilts the political discussion towards damage and cost

The Government’s Freedom of Information commission tilts the political discussion towards damage and cost

Last Friday, the Government announced a new commission on Freedom of Information. Here, Ben Worthy, a politics lecturer at Birkbeck College, University of London offers his response to the announcement, arguing that the objections to the scope and usage of FOI that have been raised are nothing new, and furthermore aren’t unique to the UK. Further, he argues that the commission’s remit tilts […]

Are reports of defamation’s death greatly exaggerated?

The annual Judicial Statistics, released in June, showed a 60% increase in defamation claims in 2014. Judith Townend, Director of the Information Law and Policy Centre, based at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, investigates the implications for defamation law development, taking into account recent data protection case law such as the ‘right to be forgotten.’

A marked spike in […]

Is Snapchat a threat to national security?

Andrew Murray is a Professor of Law at LSE with particular interest in Internet and New Media Law, Free Expression, Privacy and Surveillance. Here, he questions the grounds on which the proposed ‘Snooper’s Charter’ might limit or ban popular communication apps.

Last week reports emerged in the media that the proposed Investigatory Powers Bill may lead to the banning of popular communications […]

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    Not so different after all? Reconciling Delfi vs. Estonia with EU rules on intermediary liability

Not so different after all? Reconciling Delfi vs. Estonia with EU rules on intermediary liability

On 16 June 2015, the European Court of Human Rights delivered its final judgment in Delfi AS v. Estonia. By fifteen votes to two, the Grand Chamber ruled that there was no violation of Article 10 of the Convention of Human Rights (‘the Convention’ hereafter) despite the imposition of publisher liability for user generated content. Would the case […]

Secrecy, distrust, and interception of communications

LSE PhD researcher Bernard Keenan breaks down the different elements of the concept of “secrecy” that were highlighted by the recently-released report on surveillance laws in the UK.

The long-awaited report from the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, David Anderson QC, was published on 11 June. Entitled ‘A Question of Trust’, it is the first comprehensive and politically impartial official […]

The Post-Snowden Surveillance Policy Turmoil

Arne Hintz and Lina Dencik are conducting an 18-month research project based at Cardiff University, ‘Digital Citizenship and Surveillance Society’, looking to review and analyse what the Snowden revelations mean for policy, technology, media and civil society. Preliminary results of their research will be presented at the ‘Surveillance and Citizenship’ conference, which starts tomorrow.

The release of the Anderson Report last week, as well […]

The Delfi AS vs Estonia judgement explained

Today, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights issued its judgment in the case of Delfi AS vs Estonia, ruling that ‘The Court holds… that there has been no violation of Article 10 of the Convention.’ Professor Lorna Woods explains the key aspects of the judgment and offers her initial reaction to the decision.

The Grand Chamber […]

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    In Open Letter to Google, 80 Technology Scholars Press for More Transparency on Right to Be Forgotten Compliance

In Open Letter to Google, 80 Technology Scholars Press for More Transparency on Right to Be Forgotten Compliance

Rutgers Professor Ellen Goodman explains why 80 scholars from around the world have released an open letter to Google asking for more transparency on how it responds to user requests to delist search results, following the so-called right to be forgotten ruling last year.

One year ago, the European Court of Justice, in Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja González, […]

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    Latin America: surveillance and human rights in the digital age

Latin America: surveillance and human rights in the digital age

Fabrizio Scrollini, a PhD candidate at the LSE and Chairman of DATA, an Uruguayan based NGO working on transparency, open data and human development, argues for the need for a human rights framework to tackle issues related to the use of surveillance technologies in Latin America.

In  July 2014, the Uruguayan government secretly purchased the license for a piece […]

  • Permalink Can UN declarations and other international instruments fill in national level gaps in freedom of expression protections? 
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    If debate is silenced we risk more violence in the name of religion

If debate is silenced we risk more violence in the name of religion

Thomas Hughes, the Executive Director of ARTICLE 19, argues that states must actively protect free speech rather than merely pay it lip service. 

In the last few months, the rights to freedom of expression and freedom of religion or belief have been brought into sharp focus. The tragic Charlie Hebdo murders, and the subsequent attack on a kosher Supermarket in Paris, […]