Guest Blog

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    Here’s why the Murdochs’ bid for control of Sky must be referred to Ofcom

Here’s why the Murdochs’ bid for control of Sky must be referred to Ofcom

After Fox has now formally notified the European Commission about its bid for the broadcaster Sky, the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Karen Bradley, has 10 working days to decide whether to refer the bid to Ofcom for review. In this post, Martin Moore, Director of the Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power at […]

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    Transparency of media ownership and privatisation: challenges faced by Serbia

Transparency of media ownership and privatisation: challenges faced by Serbia

Transparency of ownership represents one of the foundations of free and independent media. While in western democracies ownership transparency tends to be high, LSE student Milan Dinic argues that this is not the case in countries undergoing transition to the west, Serbia being one of them. He looks at the state of media ownership in Serbia as the country […]

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    Internet freedom in Iran: attitudes to anonymity, privacy and FOI

Internet freedom in Iran: attitudes to anonymity, privacy and FOI

In the lead up to this year’s high level event to review the progress of the goals outlined at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), stakeholders gathered in Geneva for the WSIS forum on March 25. Kyle Bowen, researcher at Small Media, looks at some of the findings of his organisation’s latest report, which is based on […]

Reimagining, not diluting the BBC in the next decade

Continuing our series of posts responding to the BBC Charter Review Green Paper, Michael Klontzas of the University of Huddersfield looks at the latest developments from a longer term perspective, arguing that the BBC is increasingly being used by governments as an instrument of public policy and that this has a significant impact on its core purposes.

Following last Thursday’s […]

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    Explaining the ruling that overturned the UK’s Data Retention & Investigatory Powers Act

Explaining the ruling that overturned the UK’s Data Retention & Investigatory Powers Act

The English High Court just invalidated the UK’s bill on retention and investigation of communications data that was enacted in 2014 in the wake of the overturning of the EU Data Retention Directive by the European court. Lorna Woods of the University of Essex explains the ruling and its implications. 

In a very rare outcome, the English High Court has declared […]

  • Permalink Some of the BBC's most popular content is entertainment & sport. Photo by Graham Holliday [CC BY-NC 2.0]Gallery

    BBC Charter Green Paper: Inside the bizarre logic of the BBC review

BBC Charter Green Paper: Inside the bizarre logic of the BBC review

Des Freedman of Goldsmiths, University of London responds to the BBC Charter Review Green Paper, wondering it came to be that ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ should be a major symbol of the debate, and analysing the different measures of ‘value’ that various parties have used to judge the institution.

Who would have expected that one of the central debates about the future of the […]

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    BBC Charter Green Paper: Now is the time to decide what kind of BBC do you want?

BBC Charter Green Paper: Now is the time to decide what kind of BBC do you want?

Following the publication of the BBC Charter Review Green Paper,  Richard Sambrook of the University of Cardiff argues that it presents a clear choice and now the British public should express what kind of BBC it wants.

There is now a clear choice following the publication of the British government’s green paper into the future of the BBC.

Universality and market failure: two different […]

  • Permalink Twilight for the BBC? Photo by Tim Loudon [CC-BY-SA] https://www.flickr.com/photos/timloudon/241414894/in/photolist-nkjeL-9p76xN-5C9XUz-47Gjj4-cBnhYm-B2g3h-9EowFu-8w19zi-c4cgm3-bswJz4-SAvxy-sfTQn-qvPuNX-6vQdPS-e7SRwH-8w3ARY-cioDi-aHR4b-8yg3zE-5Rq8u2-mCbGKW-mMX5o-7LW8Qm-dtYfJx-7f5A3-aFLDJi-mMYLq-du2ZD9-3an9Ey-8yDCVB-3qzkPm-edXfC7-8SUvWJ-dw97QQ-mMVY4-cEsXRJ-9HEdbv-39cbs-5kz8qG-7LSaP6-4ymRg7-bEjLU5-8BLY5F-apxFYb-cEsVij-5fnzVw-jfsWQ-5GwuvH-i5Guw-ny1yZfGallery

    BBC Charter Green Paper: Where will Children’s TV be in 10 years’ time?

BBC Charter Green Paper: Where will Children’s TV be in 10 years’ time?

Responding to the Green Paper on the BBC Charter Review presented yesterday by the government, University of Westminster’s Jeanette Steemers points out that this announcement is an opportunity to make sure the BBC meets the needs of the UK’s children.

We are frequently told that children’s programming sits at the ‘heart of the BBC’s remit’ (see PACT submission to BBC Trust Public Value […]

Lessons from Germany for the BBC

Since the rushed ‘deal’ between the BBC and the Government last week on the license fee, discussions -including the House of Lords Select Committee inquiry- have focused on the BBC’s governance arrangements and the process of  reviewing license fee levels. With the independence of broadcasters again under the spotlight, LSE Postgraduate Anja Noster examines the lessons that the UK can […]

Is Snapchat a threat to national security?

Andrew Murray is a Professor of Law at LSE with particular interest in Internet and New Media Law, Free Expression, Privacy and Surveillance. Here, he questions the grounds on which the proposed ‘Snooper’s Charter’ might limit or ban popular communication apps.

Last week reports emerged in the media that the proposed Investigatory Powers Bill may lead to the banning of popular communications […]