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    BBC Charter Green Paper: Now is the time to decide what kind of BBC do you want?

BBC Charter Green Paper: Now is the time to decide what kind of BBC do you want?

Following the publication of the BBC Charter Review Green Paper,  Richard Sambrook of the University of Cardiff argues that it presents a clear choice and now the British public should express what kind of BBC it wants.

There is now a clear choice following the publication of the British government’s green paper into the future of the BBC.

Universality and market failure: two different […]

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    BBC Charter Green Paper: Where will Children’s TV be in 10 years’ time?

BBC Charter Green Paper: Where will Children’s TV be in 10 years’ time?

Responding to the Green Paper on the BBC Charter Review presented yesterday by the government, University of Westminster’s Jeanette Steemers points out that this announcement is an opportunity to make sure the BBC meets the needs of the UK’s children.

We are frequently told that children’s programming sits at the ‘heart of the BBC’s remit’ (see PACT submission to BBC Trust Public Value […]

Lessons from Germany for the BBC

Since the rushed ‘deal’ between the BBC and the Government last week on the license fee, discussions -including the House of Lords Select Committee inquiry- have focused on the BBC’s governance arrangements and the process of  reviewing license fee levels. With the independence of broadcasters again under the spotlight, LSE Postgraduate Anja Noster examines the lessons that the UK can […]

Is Snapchat a threat to national security?

Andrew Murray is a Professor of Law at LSE with particular interest in Internet and New Media Law, Free Expression, Privacy and Surveillance. Here, he questions the grounds on which the proposed ‘Snooper’s Charter’ might limit or ban popular communication apps.

Last week reports emerged in the media that the proposed Investigatory Powers Bill may lead to the banning of popular communications […]

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    BBC’s licence fee settlement eclipses the real problems PSB is facing in the UK

BBC’s licence fee settlement eclipses the real problems PSB is facing in the UK

The third Ofcom PSB review (‘Public Service Broadcasting in the Internet Age’, 2 July 2015) has been somewhat eclipsed in broadcasting circles by controversy over the settling of the BBC licence fee. Christopher Dawes, an LSE Visiting Senior Fellow who retired from a long career leading on media policy in DCMS, discusses the report findings and argues for looking at […]

Summer reading ideas from the LSE Media Policy Project

At the Media Policy Project we are often asked for readings by those wishing to get up to speed on complex policy issues: this is why we produce our policy briefs and topic guides. As many of our readers are likely to be taking summer holidays this month and next, IMPRESS Project Founding Director Jonathan Heawood (writing here in a personal […]

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    Where is diversity in PSB? Can the BBC carry BAME viewers and producers with it?

Where is diversity in PSB? Can the BBC carry BAME viewers and producers with it?

LSE’s Myria Georgiou looks at the implications of recently released Ofcom research for the BBC and its diversity goals. Dr Georgiou developed the Council of Europe/EU sponsored self-monitoring tool for diversity inclusiveness in the media MEDIANE BOX with Mediane Manager, Reynald Blion.  

Ofcom’s recent research for its Public Service Broadcasting review reveals that more than half of black ethnic audiences feel underrepresented and unfairly […]

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    Not so different after all? Reconciling Delfi vs. Estonia with EU rules on intermediary liability

Not so different after all? Reconciling Delfi vs. Estonia with EU rules on intermediary liability

On 16 June 2015, the European Court of Human Rights delivered its final judgment in Delfi AS v. Estonia. By fifteen votes to two, the Grand Chamber ruled that there was no violation of Article 10 of the Convention of Human Rights (‘the Convention’ hereafter) despite the imposition of publisher liability for user generated content. Would the case […]

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    Evidence-based policymaking for provision of children’s rights online

Evidence-based policymaking for provision of children’s rights online

LSE MSc student Alexandra Chernyavskaya reflects on the need for more evidence-based policymaking when considering children’s rights on the internet.

An important issue highlighted by those who argue for better provision for children’s rights online is that the internet is blind to the age of its users, which results in children being treated in the same manner as adult users. […]

Secrecy, distrust, and interception of communications

LSE PhD researcher Bernard Keenan breaks down the different elements of the concept of “secrecy” that were highlighted by the recently-released report on surveillance laws in the UK.

The long-awaited report from the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, David Anderson QC, was published on 11 June. Entitled ‘A Question of Trust’, it is the first comprehensive and politically impartial official […]