Guest Blog

Devolving media regulation: The Smith Commission proposals

Telecommunications researcher Ewan Sutherland argues that the Smith Commission’s proposed devolution solutions for media regulation are messy proposals that create redundant unaccountable positions and ignore important regulatory bodies. 

The Smith Commission has reported on enhanced powers for the Scottish Parliament, though some are still being transferred under the Scotland Act 2012. The major UK political parties have accepted its recommendations and […]

Governing the gatekeepers: is formal regulation needed?

Robin Mansell is Professor of New Media and the Internet at the LSE. In the latest post in our series on digital intermediaries and plurality, she argues that intermediaries are influencing media production and dissemination often in ways not fully understood by policymakers, implementing policy without oversight. Regulators have been unable to keep up with the pace of change and […]

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    Alternative internet(s): the benefits and challenges of distributed services

Alternative internet(s): the benefits and challenges of distributed services

In our series on alternative internet(s), Melanie Dulong de Rosnay, researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) Institute for Communication Sciences and a visiting fellow at the LSE, looks at the benefits and challenges of distributed internet architectures, including difficulties in assigning responsibility, liability, and identity. Read the introduction to the series that explains more about alternative internet(s) here. 
Activists are relying on alternative applications […]

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    Diversity in the media: talk is cheap, what we need is action

Diversity in the media: talk is cheap, what we need is action

Marcus Ryder is the Chair of the Royal Television Society Diversity Committee, and Head of Current Affairs BBC Scotland. He recently organised the first political hustings on media diversity between the three main Westminster political parties on how each Party would aim to increase diversity if they won the General Election in May 2015. He will be speaking at […]

November 25th, 2014|Featured, Guest Blog|0 Comments|

Developing the user perspective in the plurality dialogue

Professor Natali Helberger is professor of Information Law at the University of Amsterdam’s (UvA), Institute for Information Law (IViR). Here she highlights the need for the plurality debate to focus on user demand and consumption, in particular defining just what a sufficiently diverse news diet is, and to what ends this is being pursued.

If the ongoing debate about media plurality […]

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    Digital distributors cannot escape their editorial responsibilities

Digital distributors cannot escape their editorial responsibilities

Andrew Miller has been CEO of Guardian Media Group (GMG) since July 2010. He has presided over a five year transformation programme that has seen the Guardian shift from a print-based organisation to one that is digital-first in both philosophy and practice. Here, in a post based on his Polis Media Agenda Talk, he discusses the role played by […]

We actually lost the crypto wars

Dr. Christopher Kuner is Director of the Brussels Privacy Hub at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and an Honorary Professor at the University of Copenhagen, an Honorary Fellow of the Centre for European Legal Studies, University of Cambridge, and Senior Privacy Counsel in the Brussels office of the international law firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati. He is also editor-in-chief of the journal International Data Privacy Law published by […]

November 12th, 2014|Featured, Guest Blog, Privacy|1 Comment|
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    “Generation M” for mobile: what does growing-up digitally mean?

“Generation M” for mobile: what does growing-up digitally mean?

Lelia Green, Professor of Communications at Edith Cowan University in Australia spoke at the 2014 Safer Internet Forum: Growing-up Digitally, which was held in Brussels on 6 and 7 November. Her presentation to the conference has been adapted for this blog.  

In my 20s I was a BBC Television researcher/director for almost seven years, working mainly on children’s, teens’, […]

Could Scotland’s broadcasting be devolved?

Ewan Sutherland takes an in-depth look at the Scottish Trades Union Congress’s proposal for Scottish broadcasting to be devolved, considering the regulatory implications and the likelihood that this might go ahead.

The Scottish Trades Union Congress (STUC) has proposed to the Smith Commission that broadcasting be devolved, with item 7.6 of its statement reading: “The Scottish Parliament to be given […]

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    Google’s Advisory Council Hearings: Things to Remember and Things to Forget

Google’s Advisory Council Hearings: Things to Remember and Things to Forget

The last hearing of the Google Advisory Council on the Right to be Forgotten took place in Brussels on Tuesday. Brendan Van Alsenoy and Jef Ausloos of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Law and ICT at KU Leuven look back at the series of hearings and highlight some of the most important (and less important) points. 

In May of this year, the […]