Guest Blog

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    Digital intermediaries and the public interest standard in algorithm governance

Digital intermediaries and the public interest standard in algorithm governance

Philip Napoli is Professor of Journalism & Media Studies in the School of Communication & Information at Rutgers University, where his research focuses on media institutions and policy. He has provided testimony on media policy issues to the U.S. Senate, the FCC and the FTC as well as being featured in media outlets such as the NBC Nightly News, […]

Argentina’s “Netflix tax” isn’t surprising

LSE MSc student Ayden Fabien Férdeline looks at Argentina’s new levy on payments to foreign providers of streaming services and argues that the South American country is not trying to curtail media dissent, but is trying to keep foreign currency from heading out of the country.

As of 1 November, debit and credit card issuers in Buenos Aires are required […]

November 6th, 2014|Featured, Guest Blog|1 Comment|

English PEN asks ‘Who joins the regulator?’

Today, English Pen released a report on the impact of the Crime and Courts Act on publishers, looking in particular at the definition of a ‘relevant publisher.’ The report’s author, Helen Anthony, explains the key findings here. Anthony is a qualified, non-practising solicitor who works as a freelance policy consultant and has advised English PEN on issues relating to […]

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    Striking the balance: why we still need a plurality dialogue

Striking the balance: why we still need a plurality dialogue

Robin Foster is an adviser on strategy, policy and regulation in the media and communications sectors and a founding member of Communications Chambers. He previously held strategy and board level posts at Ofcom, Independent Television Commission, and the BBC and has provided senior level advice to leading organisations including BT, ITV, Channel 4 and BskyB. Here he argues for […]

End impunity for crimes against journalists

The United Nations has designated 2 November as the ‘International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists’. World Editors Forum President, Erik Bjerager, writes that while recent atrocities have catapulted the deaths of two American journalists, in particular, onto front pages worldwide, the murders of James Foley and Steven Sotloff – however horrendous – remain just two of 40 deaths so far this year.

It is […]

A Blog Series: Time for a Plurality Dialogue

Over the coming weeks, this blog will host insight from leading world experts focusing on the topic of the role of new digital intermediaries in the context of traditional media policy concerns with media pluralism and editorial responsibility. We are pleased to announce that Robin Foster will outline his views in a starting blog post next week, and we […]

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    The significance of a Global Agenda on Children’s Rights in the Digital Age in the South African context

The significance of a Global Agenda on Children’s Rights in the Digital Age in the South African context

Patrick Burton and Joanne Phyfer of South Africa’s Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention use the case of South Africa to argue that unique contextual factors impact children’s ICT use across varying countries and regions, which means the lack of knowledge about how children use ICTs in the global South severely limits our understanding of this issue. 

Professor Sonia Livingstone and […]

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    Media Pluralism Monitor identifies areas of concern for the UK

Media Pluralism Monitor identifies areas of concern for the UK

Robert G. Picard is Director of Research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford, a research fellow at Green Templeton College (Oxford), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. He explains the results of the pilot implementation in the UK of the European Union’s Media Pluralism Monitor.

The UK scores relatively well overall […]

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    European Commission approves Facebook/WhatsApp deal: data concentration and privacy as competition concerns?

European Commission approves Facebook/WhatsApp deal: data concentration and privacy as competition concerns?

Inge Graef, an expert on the intersection between personal data and competition law on online media platforms from KU Leuven, looks at the Facebook/WhatsApp acquisition and argues that the European Commission should have examined the impact data concentration can have on attracting and retaining users and privacy as a means of competition between competing services.  

Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp raises […]

Zero-rating: enabling or restricting Internet access?

Noelle De Guzman, a Regional Programmes Coordinator for Asia-Pacific at the Internet Society and LSE alumna looks at the pros and cons of zero-rating, but argues that even if it has benefits it is not an appropriate policy for improving connectivity in the long term. 

Broadband access policies have in recent years occupied a prime spot in digital divide discussions. […]