Internet Freedom

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    What if we all governed the Internet? Or what if we didn’t?

What if we all governed the Internet? Or what if we didn’t?

We owe the Internet to its history of multistakeholder participation, which has also enabled the decisions that have shaped the evolution and use of this crucial resource. But how relevant is this governance ‘model’ to the Internet today? On 28 October, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) launched a report aimed at better understanding this question. […]

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    Into the Darkness: How illegal surveillance is undermining open government reforms in Latin America

Into the Darkness: How illegal surveillance is undermining open government reforms in Latin America

In Latin America, the increasing scale of illegal surveillance – enabled by governments’ purchases of surveillance and hacking software – is raising urgent questions about its impact on civil rights. In this post, Fabrizio Scrollini – LSE graduate and chair of Datysoc (a project exploring surveillance, privacy and cybersecurity in the digital age) – illustrates which points need to […]

The Intimate (Self-)Regulation of Big Tech

Turkey regularly blocks non-heterosexual websites, the Apple store prohibits overtly sexual material and Facebook has a problem with female nipples. The regulation of sexual content – or content that is deemed to be of sexual nature – is a regular feature of internet governance and self-regulation of platforms and apps. In this post Lukasz Szulc, LSE Marie Curie Individual […]

Doxing is a toxic practice – no matter who is targeted

The events in the US city of Charlottesville where a far-right protest turned violent raise a multitude of questions – some of which touch upon media ethics and media regulation. Especially the practice of ‘doxing’ – sharing individuals’ personal information online to cause them harm – has significant ethical and regulatory ramifications. In this post David Brake, LSE graduate […]

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    Why the end of net neutrality is not the end of the open internet

Why the end of net neutrality is not the end of the open internet

The public consultation period on the US Federal Communications Commission’s proposal to repeal net neutrality, the principle that all traffic on the Internet should be treated the same, ends today, July 17. With 8.5 million comments, this has been by far the most widely debated policy issue in FCC’s history. The rules under consideration for repeal were adopted only […]

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    Surveillance and civil liberties: Interview with David Davis MP

Surveillance and civil liberties: Interview with David Davis MP

Yesterday’s publication of the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill marks an important moment in the ongoing debate about surveillance powers in the UK. The former Shadow Home Secretary David Davis MP is a long-time campaigner for civil liberties and has been highly critical of previous legislation, including the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act (DRIPA) which he challenged at the […]

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    Internet freedom in Iran: attitudes to anonymity, privacy and FOI

Internet freedom in Iran: attitudes to anonymity, privacy and FOI

In the lead up to this year’s high level event to review the progress of the goals outlined at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), stakeholders gathered in Geneva for the WSIS forum on March 25. Kyle Bowen, researcher at Small Media, looks at some of the findings of his organisation’s latest report, which is based on […]

Secrecy, distrust, and interception of communications

LSE PhD researcher Bernard Keenan breaks down the different elements of the concept of “secrecy” that were highlighted by the recently-released report on surveillance laws in the UK.

The long-awaited report from the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, David Anderson QC, was published on 11 June. Entitled ‘A Question of Trust’, it is the first comprehensive and politically impartial official […]

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    Complex amendment to Slovakia’s FOI Act might make it one of the most liberal in Europe

Complex amendment to Slovakia’s FOI Act might make it one of the most liberal in Europe

Andrej Školkay, head of the School of Communication and Mass Media in Bratislava, Slovakia, assesses the proposed amendment to Slovakia’s law on freedom of information, comparing it to the Czech act and looking at the changes it will herald if approved.

After two years of preparation, the Slovak Parliament is going to discuss an amendment to the law on freedom […]

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    Internet regulation and counter-terrorism: the dangerous clash in Pakistan’s regulatory regime

Internet regulation and counter-terrorism: the dangerous clash in Pakistan’s regulatory regime

Sadaf Khan, an LSE alumna who has been associated with media and the media development sector in Pakistan since 2002 and who is now Director of Programs for the non-profit Media Matters for Democracy, looks at Pakistan’s draft legislation on cybercrime and the threats it poses.

Pakistan has been without a legal framework to deal with Cybercrime since 2009. […]