Media Plurality and Ownership

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    AVMS Review and Media Regulators’ Independence: the Dancing Procession of Echternach?

AVMS Review and Media Regulators’ Independence: the Dancing Procession of Echternach?

On Monday September 26 2016 the CULT committee of the European Parliament will hold a hearing on the Audiovisual Media Services review. In its legislative proposal of May this year, the European Commission proposed introducing an obligation for Member States to guarantee the independence of their media regulators (specifying a number of independence requirements). The draft report of the […]

Facebook is a new breed of editor: a social editor

Facebook’s approach to allowing, censoring or prioritising content that appears in the news feed has recently been the focus of much attention, both media and governmental. Professor Natali Helberger of the Institute for Information Law at the University of Amsterdam argues that we need to seek to understand the new kind of editorial role that Facebook is playing, in […]

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    Media freedom has come a long way in Africa, but it’s still precarious

Media freedom has come a long way in Africa, but it’s still precarious

Tawana Kupe, Deputy Vice Chancellor and Associate Professor in Media Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, examines the increase of media freedom in Africa and highlights some obstacles still to be overcome.

Reporters Without Borders’ latest World Press Freedom Index shows two interesting things. Namibia, ranked number 17, has the most improved press freedom environment in the world. And Africa, […]

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    Ofcom’s Plurality Framework: A step in the right direction, but still unfinished work

Ofcom’s Plurality Framework: A step in the right direction, but still unfinished work

Following the recent publication by Ofcom of its measurement framework for media plurality, LSE Research Officer Sharif Labo argues that although there are significant gaps in the framework, it offers a solid foundation to measure plurality in a fast-changing media environment. The UK Parliament, in consultation with Ofcom, must now use the opportunity of the first baseline assessment to […]

Ofcom’s Plurality Framework: Protecting the Status Quo?

Justin Schlosberg, from Birkbeck, University of London, responds to this week’s publication of Ofcom’s measurement framework for media plurality, arguing that the choice of metrics and the lack of ‘clear bright lines’ in the framework hamper a proper review of media concentration, and instead simply preserve the status quo. He has previously written a policy brief on Modelling Media […]

How not to measure the news plurality problem

As Ofcom proposes measuring news consumption to assess media plurality in the UK, Martin Moore, Director of the Media Standards Trust, carries out an experiment to measure his news consumption over the course of a single day. How easily can news consumption be measured, and how do we define what counts as ‘news’ in the first place? Moore examines the […]

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    Transparency of media ownership and privatisation: challenges faced by Serbia

Transparency of media ownership and privatisation: challenges faced by Serbia

Transparency of ownership represents one of the foundations of free and independent media. While in western democracies ownership transparency tends to be high, LSE student Milan Dinic argues that this is not the case in countries undergoing transition to the west, Serbia being one of them. He looks at the state of media ownership in Serbia as the country […]

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    Send in the robots: automated journalism and its potential impact on media pluralism (part 2)

Send in the robots: automated journalism and its potential impact on media pluralism (part 2)

In his previous post, Pieter-Jan Ombelet of the KU Leuven Interdisciplinary Centre for Law and ICT (ICRI-CIR) analysed automated journalism (also referred to as robotic reporting) as a potential solution to combat the diminution of investigative journalism. Here, he focuses on the future possibilities of robotic reporting in personalising specific news stories for each reader and assesses the potential […]

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    Send in the robots: automated journalism and its potential impact on media pluralism (1)

Send in the robots: automated journalism and its potential impact on media pluralism (1)

Resources for investigative journalism are diminishing. In the digital age, this was a foreseeable evolution: publishers typically regard these pieces as time-consuming and expensive, and the results of the research are often unpredictable and potentially disappointing. In this first of two posts, Pieter-Jan Ombelet of the KU Leuven Interdisciplinary Centre for Law and ICT (ICRI-CIR) analyses automated journalism (also […]

Our top 10 blog posts so far this year

As you prepare to embark on (or return from) summer holidays, why not take a look at our most read blog posts so far this year? Here are some of the Media Policy Project Blog’s highlights from January to June 2015, covering children’s rights and digital safety, the European Audiovisual Media Services Directive and Digital Single Market Strategy, privacy […]