Media Plurality and Ownership

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    Responsiveness and legitimacy in the regulation of the press

Responsiveness and legitimacy in the regulation of the press

Last night Sir Alan Moses delivered a speech at the LSE on the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) and the future of press regulation. In it he cited the work of LSE’s Pro Director for Research, Julia Black. Here she argues that Moses and IPSO need to remember their role is to protect the public, not the regulated. 

Sir Alan Moses’ impassioned […]

Who owns the media? Sometimes no one knows

Marius Dragomir and Mark Thompson look at the state of transparency of media ownership in Southeastern Europe and argue that the EU Commissioners must encourage European-level action. 

Southeastern Europe suffers from some of the world’s least transparent media ownership. In a Mapping Digital Media (MDM) report on Macedonia in 2012, Roberto Belicanec and Zoran Ricliev wrote that “there are no formal or legal requirements for […]

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    New Voices on the Future of Audiovisual Media Services in Europe

New Voices on the Future of Audiovisual Media Services in Europe

Sally Broughton Micova, Deputy Director of the LSE Media Policy Project and a Fellow at LSE, on today’s event, The Future of Audiovisual Media Services in Europe. Follow the discussion on Twitter via #AVMSfuture.

Today, approximately 200 people will gather in Brussels to discuss the future of audiovisual media services in Europe. It has been 25 years since the Television […]

Media mergers under scrutiny in Ireland

In December 2014, Ireland’s Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources published draft guidelines on media mergers and invited comments until 22 January. Stephen Dunne, journalist and PhD candidate at Dublin City University, looks at the guidelines and at the implications of this move.

Democratic governments are wary of picking a fight with wealthy media moguls and their powerful media […]

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    The Plurality Dialogue: what have we learned, and where next?

The Plurality Dialogue: what have we learned, and where next?

To conclude our Plurality Dialogue series, LSE Media Policy Project director Damian Tambini addresses the most crucial questions that policymakers should be considering with regards to the role that digital intermediaries play in the democratic process.

How might Facebook, Google and other intermediaries influence the outcome of the 2015 UK election? Are they displacing newspapers and TV as kingmakers? As […]

Governing the gatekeepers: is formal regulation needed?

Robin Mansell is Professor of New Media and the Internet at the LSE. In the latest post in our series on digital intermediaries and plurality, she argues that intermediaries are influencing media production and dissemination often in ways not fully understood by policymakers, implementing policy without oversight. Regulators have been unable to keep up with the pace of change and […]

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    Picard: We must keep the focus on why plurality is important

Picard: We must keep the focus on why plurality is important

Robert G. Picard is Director of Research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford, a research fellow at Green Templeton College (Oxford), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. Here he argues that digital intermediaries should not be ignored in the debates over media pluralism, particularly when they perform editorial functions. This […]

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    Alternative internet(s) – what are they and do they have a future?

Alternative internet(s) – what are they and do they have a future?

This is the first post in a series on alternative internet(s), following a workshop on the topic at the LSE in September, organised by Mélanie Dulong de Rosnay, Francesca Musiani, Alison Powell and Panayotis Antoniadis.  The authors introduce the key topics that will be covered in the series here. 

The Internet has been conceived as a distributed, decentralized and self-organized […]

Informational justice as the new media pluralism

Professor Ellen P. Goodman is a Professor of Law at Rutgers University and Co-Director of the Rutgers Institute for Information Policy & Law.  Her research interests include media policy, spectrum policy, free speech, and the use of information as a policy tool. Here she argues that existing media and plurality policies need to evolve to account for new complexities […]

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    Pluralism after scarcity: the benefits of digital technologies

Pluralism after scarcity: the benefits of digital technologies

In this latest post in our series on the role of digital intermediaries and media plurality, Peter Barron, Google’s head of communications for Europe, Middle East and Africa, and his colleague Simon Morrison, Public Policy Manager, argue that the Internet and digital technologies have only increased media pluralism.

It seems strange, at first glance, that we still debate whether the […]