Press Regulation

Summer reading ideas from the LSE Media Policy Project

At the Media Policy Project we are often asked for readings by those wishing to get up to speed on complex policy issues: this is why we produce our policy briefs and topic guides. As many of our readers are likely to be taking summer holidays this month and next, IMPRESS Project Founding Director Jonathan Heawood (writing here in a personal […]

Greek media in disarray

Maria Kyriakidou, lecturer at the University of East Anglia and researcher on the Euro Crisis in the Press project, discusses a new report on Media Policy and Independent Journalism in Greece and explains the current challenges for Greek media.

There is perhaps no other field that better illustrates how deeply ingrained clientelism is in Greek political culture than the media sector. […]

What is wrong with the Greek media?

LSE Phd researcher Vaios Papanagnou reviews a new report on Media Policy and Independent Journalism in Greece and draws an analysis of the state of the country’s journalism.

The unravelling of the Greek media system has been spectacular. This was not only due to its centrality in the public space, but more importantly because of the intensity of its destruction. The annihilation of […]

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    Why IMPRESS is Seeking Recognition as an Independent Press Regulator

Why IMPRESS is Seeking Recognition as an Independent Press Regulator

Yesterday, IMPRESS announced that it would seek recognition under the Royal Charter put into place following the Leveson Inquiry. In short, this means that once the exemplary damages clause of the Crime and Courts Act 2013 kicks in in November, IMPRESS members would only have to pay their own costs in libel and privacy cases, while as other publishers […]

GE2015: Party positions on press regulation

The three main UK political parties – the Conservatives, the Liberal Democrats and Labour – have set out their policy priorities for the media & telecoms sectors in their party manifestos. A recent report from Enders Analysis highlights areas of convergence and divergence between them in different areas of TMT policy. Although there will be considerable policy continuity from […]

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    Scrutinising the scrutineers: European Scrutiny Committee, BBC, and EU bias

Scrutinising the scrutineers: European Scrutiny Committee, BBC, and EU bias

Julian Petley is Professor of Screen Media and Journalism in the School of Arts at Brunel University. In this post he asks whether the BBC’s editorial independence is under threat due to the European Scrutiny Committee repeatedly accusing it of a pro-EU bias.

In 2013 the European Scrutiny Committee produced a report in which it argued that “given the possibility of some form of […]

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    Nought for your comfort: Sir Alan Moses’ speech to the LSE Media Policy Project

Nought for your comfort: Sir Alan Moses’ speech to the LSE Media Policy Project

Media lawyer Jonathan Coad is a partner in the Media Brands and Technology Group at Lewis Silkin LLP and acts for both Claimants and Defendants. He expresses disappointment that IPSO (Independent Press Standards Organisation) seems to be heading in the same ineffectual direction as the PCC (Press Complaints Commission).
When I read of the appointment of Sir Alan Moses to the vital […]

Moses’ theory for IPSO: less independence, not more

LSE Media Policy Project director Damian Tambini responds to Sir Alan Moses’ speech on IPSO and the future of press regulation, given at the LSE last week.

Alan Moses has offered a spirited and entertaining defence of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO). As a theoretical justification of his approach to IPSO however, it is dangerous, because he proposes […]

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    Responsiveness and legitimacy in the regulation of the press

Responsiveness and legitimacy in the regulation of the press

Last night Sir Alan Moses delivered a speech at the LSE on the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) and the future of press regulation. In it he cited the work of LSE’s Pro Director for Research, Julia Black. Here she argues that Moses and IPSO need to remember their role is to protect the public, not the regulated. 

Sir Alan Moses’ impassioned […]

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    Watching the watchdog: Making self-regulation work in journalism

Watching the watchdog: Making self-regulation work in journalism

A new report from the Ethical Journalism Network (EJN) looks at how journalism is monitored in 16 countries across five continents and the impact this has on public trust. EJN Communications officer Stefanie Chernow and director Aidan White discuss how to make self-regulation work in the UK and elsewhere. 

Almost three years after the dark heart of British journalism […]