Press Regulation

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    ‘Toothless’ press regulator is a busted flush, but genuine post-Leveson reform is still on the way

‘Toothless’ press regulator is a busted flush, but genuine post-Leveson reform is still on the way

Since the dust settled on the Leveson Inquiry and its recommendations, much of the UK media has sought to portray the newly-formed Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) as the answer to the press regulation question and the end of the story. Steven Barnett argues this is far from the case, and genuine independent regulation through the Royal Charter framework remains both necessary and […]

February 6th, 2015|Press Regulation|0 Comments|

Devolving media regulation: The Smith Commission proposals

Telecommunications researcher Ewan Sutherland argues that the Smith Commission’s proposed devolution solutions for media regulation are messy proposals that create redundant unaccountable positions and ignore important regulatory bodies. 

The Smith Commission has reported on enhanced powers for the Scottish Parliament, though some are still being transferred under the Scotland Act 2012. The major UK political parties have accepted its recommendations and […]

Online freedoms: all relative?

Freedom House published its annual report Freedom on the Net 2014 today, which studies and evaluates the development of internet and digital media freedom in 65 countries around the world. LSE Alum Anri van der Spuy, who contributed to the report on the United Kingdom with the LSE Media Policy Project (but was not involved in the scoring process), […]

English PEN asks ‘Who joins the regulator?’

Today, English Pen released a report on the impact of the Crime and Courts Act on publishers, looking in particular at the definition of a ‘relevant publisher.’ The report’s author, Helen Anthony, explains the key findings here. Anthony is a qualified, non-practising solicitor who works as a freelance policy consultant and has advised English PEN on issues relating to […]

The hackers hacked and press freedom in peril

Angela Phillips, author of the recently published book Journalism in Context, argues that British news media needs an authoritative, moral, and collective voice to fight against the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act and to preserve a free and open press. 
For the first time since the start of the hacking enquiries, the British Press is speaking with one voice in its condemnation […]

Would the paisley pyjamas sting stand up in court?

Nicholas Robin argues that recent cases involving media trying to lure MPs into their pyjamas and get pop singers to deal drugs raise doubts about whether the definition of the public interest should be left to the press industry or prosecutors to decide.

The Sunday Mirror’s use of a fake Twitter account to trick an MP into sending ‘selfies’ of […]

Three months to save IPSO

Our own Damian Tambini, associate professor at the London School of Economics and chair of the LSE Media Policy Project, argues that if Sir Alan Moses is to restructure IPSO into a more legitimate regulator he had better act fast. 

According to Hacked Off, the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) is ‘a sham regulator’ that defies the will of Parliament […]

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    The IMPRESS Project: a viable, independent model of press regulation?

The IMPRESS Project: a viable, independent model of press regulation?

Jonathan Heawood is director of the IMPRESS Project, which is building a regulatory body for the UK press. Last week, he spoke with the LSE Media Policy Project and members of the industry, academia and civil society about the project’s progress and goals.  Here is an excerpt of his remarks.

IPSO has now officially launched, but it did so under […]

Media Plurality in the UK: Where Do We Go From Here?

Chris Dawes, an industry veteran and Senior Visiting Fellow at the LSE,  analyses the Government’s recent response to the report into media plurality by noting the challenges of measuring plurality, examining possible next steps for Ofcom, and arguing that competition law and public interest assessments may prove to be the key tools in regulating media influence.  The Government published on […]

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    A Predictable Act of Political Cowardice: The Government’s Response on Media Ownership

A Predictable Act of Political Cowardice: The Government’s Response on Media Ownership

We’ve briefly come back  from our summer recess (until August 18) to share this response from Steven Barnett, Professor of Communications at the University of Westminster, who is directing an AHRC funded project on Media Power and Plurality. His detailed analysis of government policy inaction, co-authored with Judith Townend, has just been published in The Political Quarterly: ‘And What Good […]