Privacy

  • Permalink Gallery

    If children don’t know an ad from information, how can they grasp how companies use their personal data?

If children don’t know an ad from information, how can they grasp how companies use their personal data?

All EU member states have until May 2018 to incorporate the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) into British law. Article 8 states that, unless member states decide otherwise, children under the age of 16 years old will require parental permission to use “information society services”, which refers to most online resources. Most provisions of the GDPR are to improve […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Tech firms want to detect your emotions and expressions, but people don’t like it

Tech firms want to detect your emotions and expressions, but people don’t like it

News emerged in June 2017 that Facebook was seeking three patents focussed on harnessing users’ emotions, using both cameras on devices and users’ messaging patterns. Facebook has been clear that seeking patents doesn’t mean it is planning to introduce this technology imminently, but it is an indication of what might be possible. Andrew McStay, Reader in Advertising and Digital […]

What will the UK election mean for online privacy?

Online privacy and the implications for data security are under intense discussion, particularly following the UK’s third terrorist attack in recent months, which led Prime Minister Theresa May to reiterate her call for more regulation of online spaces. In advance of Thursday’s general election, Vladlena Benson, Associate Professor, Department of Accounting, Finance and Informatics, Kingston University, looks at what […]

  • Permalink EP, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Children’s rights and the GDPR – are the new consultations creating light or further confusion?

Children’s rights and the GDPR – are the new consultations creating light or further confusion?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is due to become law throughout the EU on 25 May 2018. Recent consultations from the UK’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) have sought views on, among other aspects, the implications for children and their data. LSE Professor Sonia Livingstone explains some of the issues […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    If advertisers want to avoid ad-blockers, they’ll have to give us more power over our personal data

If advertisers want to avoid ad-blockers, they’ll have to give us more power over our personal data

Online publications, like their print counterparts, have traditionally made the bulk of their revenue from advertising. One of the factors that is currently threatening this is the public’s use of ad blocking software. Lyndsey Burton, founder of consumer information site Choose, argues that the public needs to better understand what data is gathered by ad trackers, and that they should […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Trump’s FCC continues to redefine the public interest as business interests

Trump’s FCC continues to redefine the public interest as business interests

In a climate of political change in the US, President Trump’s government is introducing new policies regarding media ownership, subsidized internet access, net neutrality and online privacy. In this post, Christopher Ali, Assistant Professor at the Department of Media Studies at University of Virginia provides an overview of recent media policy changes and makes a case for why citizens […]

When is a toothbrush not just a toothbrush?

Rules around data collection are undergoing reform in the UK with the Digital Economy Bill and the EU General Data Protection Regulation, due to become law in May 2018. Here Joanna Adler, Professor of Forensic Psychology and Director of Forensic Psychological Services at Middlesex University, writes about the growing ‘internet of things’ and implications for privacy and media literacy, […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Could the European GDPR undermine the UK Investigatory Powers Act?

Could the European GDPR undermine the UK Investigatory Powers Act?

The Investigatory Powers Act, also widely known as the Snooper’s Charter, received Royal Assent on 29 November, 2016, and thus is now law. However, 2016 also saw the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) being approved by the EU Parliament in April. Pascal Crowe, postgraduate student at the LSE, attended a recent conference organised by Alison Harcourt of the University […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    How the UK passed the most invasive surveillance law in democratic history

How the UK passed the most invasive surveillance law in democratic history

The Investigatory Powers Bill was recently passed by both Houses of the UK parliament and is set to become law, likely by the end of the year. Paul Bernal, Lecturer in Information Technology, Intellectual Property and Media Law, University of East Anglia, looks at the implications of the bill.

You might not have noticed thanks to world events, but the […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Corbyn’s digital meh-nifesto is too rooted in the past to offer much for the future

Corbyn’s digital meh-nifesto is too rooted in the past to offer much for the future

Paul Bernal is a Lecturer in Information Technology, Intellectual Property and Media Law in the University of East Anglia School of Law. Here he raises questions about the implications of Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn’s new Digital democracy manifesto. 
While the Labour Party recently launched their Digital Democracy Manifesto with as much fanfare as they could muster, the reaction to it could […]