The Plurality Dialogue

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    Ofcom consultation – implications for Google and Facebook?

Ofcom consultation – implications for Google and Facebook?

The Leveson Inquiry debated media plurality in the UK, and the implication of concentrated media power for democracy, but did not make detailed recommendations for policy change. Since then, Parliament and also Government have consulted. Now the regulator Ofcom has been asked to come up with a new framework for measuring media plurality and is consulting on this until 20 May. Sharif Labo and […]

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    The Plurality Dialogue: what have we learned, and where next?

The Plurality Dialogue: what have we learned, and where next?

To conclude our Plurality Dialogue series, LSE Media Policy Project director Damian Tambini addresses the most crucial questions that policymakers should be considering with regards to the role that digital intermediaries play in the democratic process.

How might Facebook, Google and other intermediaries influence the outcome of the 2015 UK election? Are they displacing newspapers and TV as kingmakers? As […]

Governing the gatekeepers: is formal regulation needed?

Robin Mansell is Professor of New Media and the Internet at the LSE. In the latest post in our series on digital intermediaries and plurality, she argues that intermediaries are influencing media production and dissemination often in ways not fully understood by policymakers, implementing policy without oversight. Regulators have been unable to keep up with the pace of change and […]

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    Picard: We must keep the focus on why plurality is important

Picard: We must keep the focus on why plurality is important

Robert G. Picard is Director of Research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford, a research fellow at Green Templeton College (Oxford), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. Here he argues that digital intermediaries should not be ignored in the debates over media pluralism, particularly when they perform editorial functions. This […]

Informational justice as the new media pluralism

Professor Ellen P. Goodman is a Professor of Law at Rutgers University and Co-Director of the Rutgers Institute for Information Policy & Law.  Her research interests include media policy, spectrum policy, free speech, and the use of information as a policy tool. Here she argues that existing media and plurality policies need to evolve to account for new complexities […]

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    Pluralism after scarcity: the benefits of digital technologies

Pluralism after scarcity: the benefits of digital technologies

In this latest post in our series on the role of digital intermediaries and media plurality, Peter Barron, Google’s head of communications for Europe, Middle East and Africa, and his colleague Simon Morrison, Public Policy Manager, argue that the Internet and digital technologies have only increased media pluralism.

It seems strange, at first glance, that we still debate whether the […]

Developing the user perspective in the plurality dialogue

Professor Natali Helberger is professor of Information Law at the University of Amsterdam’s (UvA), Institute for Information Law (IViR). Here she highlights the need for the plurality debate to focus on user demand and consumption, in particular defining just what a sufficiently diverse news diet is, and to what ends this is being pursued.

If the ongoing debate about media plurality […]

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    Digital distributors cannot escape their editorial responsibilities

Digital distributors cannot escape their editorial responsibilities

Andrew Miller has been CEO of Guardian Media Group (GMG) since July 2010. He has presided over a five year transformation programme that has seen the Guardian shift from a print-based organisation to one that is digital-first in both philosophy and practice. Here, in a post based on his Polis Media Agenda Talk, he discusses the role played by […]

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    Digital intermediaries and the public interest standard in algorithm governance

Digital intermediaries and the public interest standard in algorithm governance

Philip Napoli is Professor of Journalism & Media Studies in the School of Communication & Information at Rutgers University, where his research focuses on media institutions and policy. He has provided testimony on media policy issues to the U.S. Senate, the FCC and the FTC as well as being featured in media outlets such as the NBC Nightly News, […]

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    Striking the balance: why we still need a plurality dialogue

Striking the balance: why we still need a plurality dialogue

Robin Foster is an adviser on strategy, policy and regulation in the media and communications sectors and a founding member of Communications Chambers. He previously held strategy and board level posts at Ofcom, Independent Television Commission, and the BBC and has provided senior level advice to leading organisations including BT, ITV, Channel 4 and BskyB. Here he argues for […]