Truth, Trust & Technology Commission

Time to rethink truth and trust

Trust in tech – or the lack of it – is at the heart of much public anxiety about the digital age. That’s one reason why we have embarked on a major Truth, Trust and Technology Commission. Sonia Livingstone OBE, LSE Professor of Social Psychology and Chair of the Commission, who spoke at Digital Agenda’s Power and Responsibility Summit […]

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    Anticipatory regulation: a way forward for platform governance?

Anticipatory regulation: a way forward for platform governance?

Tackling the crisis in public information and the role of information technology companies such as Facebook and Google is a much-debated topic in the UK, and a focus of our LSE Commission on Truth, Trust and Technology which will launch its report in November. The Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee has published its interim report from its inquiry into fake news, and […]

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    Regulating online platforms for misinformation and disinformation

Regulating online platforms for misinformation and disinformation

How to deal with misinformation is a topic of significant debate in the UK, and a focus of our LSE Commission on Truth, Trust and Technology, which will launch its report in November. The Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee has released its interim report from its inquiry into fake news, and is likely to publish its final report […]

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    Gearing up for the next European elections: will we see regulation of online political advertising?

Gearing up for the next European elections: will we see regulation of online political advertising?

The next European Parliament elections are due to be held in late May 2019. Among fears of a populist wave and of foreign interference, the European Commission has been looking at potential options for regulation of online political advertising and disinformation. Sofia Karttunen, European Affairs Officer at the European Association of Communication Agencies, looks here at different ways to […]

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    The essential elements of the new Internet governance: diversity, optimism and independence

The essential elements of the new Internet governance: diversity, optimism and independence

In May 2018, UK Government set out its plan to publish a Code of Conduct and develop proposals to legislate on Internet safety. In July 2018 the Internet Commission’s Dialogue on Digital Responsibility convened leading thinkers and civil society advocates to debate related proposals from others about transparency reporting, an accountability framework and the idea of a duty of […]

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    House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”

House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”

Oscar Davies is a media lawyer who will start pupillage at One Brick Court in October 2019. In this blog, he provides the second part of his overview of the evidence submitted for the House of Lords Communications Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?” (Part 1 can be found here). Responses to questions 4 to 6 of the Call […]

DCMS “Fake News” Report – time for a new approach?

Dr Damian Tambini welcomes the Select Committee on Digital, Culture Media and Sport’s interim report on “fake news”, but argues that the issues it has uncovered cannot be effectively dealt with by a Parliamentary Committee.

Unfortunately the Fake News report was leaked by Dominic Cummings in a cynical attempt to personalise, delegitimise, and thus derail an important policy discussion. What […]

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    In the era of ‘fake news’, Americans would like to change the media model

In the era of ‘fake news’, Americans would like to change the media model

This article by Marc Fleurbaey, Professor in Economics and Humanistic Studies, Princeton University was originally published on The Conversation and Inforrm and is reposted here with thanks.

In a November 2016 article, Nick Couldry and Clemencia Rodriguez (from the International Panel on Social Progress) stated that “media infrastructure is a common good whose governance and design should be much more open to democratic engagement than currently.” Does the population […]

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    If digital intermediaries are to be regulated, how should it be done?

If digital intermediaries are to be regulated, how should it be done?

Jacob Rowbottom is a Fellow of University College, Oxford and is the author of Media Law (2018). Following the recent call by The Times for a new statutory online regulator, he outlines the case for a possible system of meta-regulation and explains how this might work in the case of digital intermediaries.

The regulation of digital intermediaries has been an […]

Digital Dominance: an event report

Digital Dominance was described by its co-editor Damian Tambini as a ‘problem-definition’ book rather than a ‘solutions’ book, taking an interdisciplinary approach to questions such as the implications of the effect of tech giants’ market and social power on media pluralism, freedom of expression and electoral legitimacy.