Date & time: 15 June 2016, 9:30 – 17:30

Venue: CEPS Conference Room
1, Place du Congrès 1000
Brussels, Belgium

TV screen whiteThe LSE Media Policy Project, in collaboration with the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), is holding a conference on Audiovisual Media Services within the Digital Single Market at the CEPS premises in Brussels.

The European Commission released its proposal for changes to the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) on 25 May. We now expect a period of intense debate and lobbying that will be largely dominated by voices from the larger, longer-standing EU member states. In this first major event organised to respond to the Commission’s proposal, the LSE Media Policy Project has partnered with the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) to bring to Brussels voices less often heard form in debates about this sector from across the EU. Scholars from Hungary, Estonia, Spain, Poland and other countries will introduce new research findings and evidence to broaden the crucial discussion about the future of audiovisual media services in Europe.

The speakers selected presented papers on topics including:

  • New research on the issue of distinguishing between linear and non-linear audiovisual media services
  • New research on ‘catch-up’ services and the application of the Directive’s content quotas
    Cross-platform competition and market-balance suggestions for the application of Directive requirements to live-streaming and sharing services
  • New research on media pluralism and diversity from a consumer perspective, and in relation to local, regional and community media

The event was free to attend and the programme is available here. A summary of the event can be found here.


Presentations from the event

Indrek Ibrus – Serving small markets: Modelling application of AVMSD according to graduated size based regulation
Marko Milosavljevic – Framework for commercial communications within the Digital Single Market
Krisztina Rozgonyi and Katharine Sarikakis – Supporting European AV works diversity beyond quotas