VOSSD

About Dustin Voss

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Dustin Voss has created 23 entries.

Deregulated trade and international solidarity

In the controversy on CETA, TTIP, and the imminent trade war, politics and economics intersect. Traditional neoclassical economics treat free trade as a one-way mechanism where the welfare of all involved parties increases with trade volume. The reality however is different, argues Patrick Mokre. Many progressive economists have criticized the underlying theories – this critique forms the necessary precondition […]

November 12th, 2018|Featured, Trade Unions|0 Comments|

Robotisation and globalization: the enemy of my enemy?

Toon van Overbeke of the LSE reflects on the ongoing debate about the consequences of automation for the future of work. He argues that as technology is becoming cheaper and more advanced the cost-benefit analysis of off-shoring could well be changing away from further outsourcing and towards reshoring manufacturing back to Europe.

One would be hard-pressed to find many […]

EMU revisited: Everyone relax, please!

Fiscally, the Eurozone is far from implosion. On average, public debt remains absolutely manageable. The political implications of the debt blame-game are more worrying, argues Rainer Voss.

‘Tis this time of the year again: time for school reports! This means, it’s time for ‘blue letters’ to those who haven’t done their homework – or rather their household chores. Not at […]

Wages in the gig economy and beyond

Bob Hancké of the London School of Economics examines the wage effects of the gig economy and the potential need for improved regulation and adapted social security systems that cover gig workers more extensively.

Bank of England’s chief economist Andy Haldane is one of the brighter bulbs in economic policy-making. He regularly looks at many different parts of the economy and their effects on […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The dismantling of the state since the 1980s: Brexit is the wrong diagnosis of a real crisis

The dismantling of the state since the 1980s: Brexit is the wrong diagnosis of a real crisis

The vote to leave the EU and the administrative chaos around it pull into focus a crisis the UK should have been talking about before: the failures of homegrown neoliberal policies and their dire implications, writes Abby Innes. She argues that while Brexit has been heralded by supporters as a solution to a wide range of problems, what it will actually […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Globalisation, Trump and the Nation State: There’s still room for manoeuvre!

Globalisation, Trump and the Nation State: There’s still room for manoeuvre!

By Bob Hancké, LSE

Since the late 1980s a conventional and convenient argument in economic policy-making has been that globalisation in its many forms, but especially financially and commercially, constrains governments in their ability to adopt policies that protect citizens and workers. Left-wing observers lament the incapacity of governments to directly secure and influence the life chances of their citizens, […]

September 28th, 2018|In the Media|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Olaf Scholz, Federal Minister of Finance and Vice Chancellor of Germany, Credit: OSCE Parliamentary Assembly (CC BY-SA 2.0)Gallery

    Germany is quietly rebalancing its economy – but this will not fix the Eurozone’s flaws

Germany is quietly rebalancing its economy – but this will not fix the Eurozone’s flaws

A common criticism of Germany in the post-crisis period has been that its economy is unbalanced, with the country’s reluctance to increase public spending or reduce its large current account surplus being cited as problems for other Eurozone economies. Donato Di Carlo argues that this narrative entirely overlooks the extent to which the German economy has already gone through a […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Ten years after – Is another financial crisis lurking and are we ready for it?

Ten years after – Is another financial crisis lurking and are we ready for it?

By Bob Hancké, LSE

Robert Skidelsky, the Keynesian historian and political economist, wrote a very interesting column in the Guardian looking back at the ten years since the starts of the Great Financial Crisis. The upshot: it didn’t look good and it doesn’t look good. After the short flirtation with Keynesianism at the G20, the austerity narrative took over – most […]

September 14th, 2018|In the Media|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Government Regulation of Corporate Social Responsibility: What are the Implications for Corporate Governance?

Government Regulation of Corporate Social Responsibility: What are the Implications for Corporate Governance?

Corporate governance is a complex idea that is often inappropriately simplified as a cookbook of recommended measures to improve financial performance. Many studies suggest that the supposed benign effects of these measures —independent directors or highly incentivised executives— are at best context specific. Corporate Governance in Contention explores and explains the meaning, purpose, and importance of corporate governance, with discussions […]

September 13th, 2018|Featured|0 Comments|

Labour, Capital and Corporate Governance

Corporate governance is a complex idea that is often inappropriately simplified as a cookbook of recommended measures to improve financial performance. Many studies suggest that the supposed benign effects of these measures —independent directors or highly incentivised executives— are at best context specific. Corporate Governance in Contention explores and explains the meaning, purpose, and importance of corporate governance, with discussions […]

September 11th, 2018|Featured, Trade Unions|1 Comment|