In the news

  • Permalink Gallery

    The digital environment is fundamental to today’s sex education: nearly two decades-old sex and relationship education will be updated, finally!

The digital environment is fundamental to today’s sex education: nearly two decades-old sex and relationship education will be updated, finally!

The Department for Education’s consultation on changes to teaching on sex and relationship education and Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) recently closed. LSE’s Professor Sonia Livingstone and MSc Media Communications Governance student DaYoung Yoo give their view on what the Department should do as it considers how to improve PSHE, arguing that the digital must be a dimension of all teaching.

The Department for Education […]

November 2nd, 2018|Featured, In the news|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Dire warnings about children dying because of apps and games are a form of ‘juvenoia’

Dire warnings about children dying because of apps and games are a form of ‘juvenoia’

In this post Larry Magid takes a look at the recent media coverage of two apps and games that have been accused of harming children’s mental health. He argues that these sensationalist stories are often based on fake news and may serve only to exaggerate fears surrounding online risk in potentially damaging ways. Larry is a technology journalist and an Internet safety advocate. He is […]

September 21st, 2018|Featured, In the news|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Does excessive social media use actually harm the self-esteem of young people?

Does excessive social media use actually harm the self-esteem of young people?

A Swedish survey has claimed that social media use negatively affects the self esteem of young people. But such studies must take into account the complex intertwining of online and offline worlds, and recognise that a sharp distinction  between life, relationships, and communication online and offline is no longer meaningful. Stine Liv Johansen is an Associate Professor at the Centre […]

September 19th, 2018|Featured, In the news|0 Comments|

It’s time to end the Wild West of the Web

Rapidly developing technology and the ubiquity of social media means that there is increasing risk of child sexual exploitation or abuse online. A recent NSPCC FOI investigation found there were more than 3,000 police-recorded offences for sexual communication with a child in England and Wales in 2017/18 alone. In this post, Pooja Kumari introduces the NSPCC’s new Wild West Web […]

September 14th, 2018|Featured, In the news|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Conceptualising privacy online: what do, and what should, children understand?

Conceptualising privacy online: what do, and what should, children understand?

Post-Cambridge-Analytica, and post-GDPR, children are becoming increasingly aware of how their data is being used online but there are still limits to their digital literacy. In this post, Sonia Livingstone, Mariya Stoilova and Rishita Nandagiri discuss how they are conceptualising issues of privacy and personal data in their latest ICO-funded research into children’s understanding of privacy and data use […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Critical digital literacy: Ten key readings for our distrustful media age

Critical digital literacy: Ten key readings for our distrustful media age

Misinformation and distrust are the characteristics of our time and make the question of how to promote critical digital literacy particularly important. Here, Gianfranco Polizzi suggests ten texts that offer a framework for thinking about how to approach it. Gianfranco is a PhD researcher at the Department of Media and Communications, LSE. Employing a mixed qualitative methodology, his PhD looks at the intersection of […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Fake news and critical literacy: new findings, new questions

Fake news and critical literacy: new findings, new questions

The UK’s Commission on Fake News and the Teaching of Critical Literacy Skills recently published a report on fake news and critical literacy which surveyed schoolchildren and teachers. LSE PhD researcher Gianfranco Polizzi summarises the key findings of the report – which include that only 2% of children can spot fake news – and sets out his recommendations in response. [Header image credit: Y.C.V. […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Media literacy – everyone’s favourite solution to the problems of regulation

Media literacy – everyone’s favourite solution to the problems of regulation

Media literacy is often cited as the solution – but to what problem? In this post Professor of Social Psychology at LSE and Chair of the LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission, Sonia Livingstone, provides an overview of the current debates about the benefits and limits of media literacy following a recent Westminster Media Forum seminar about fake news at which she spoke. [Header […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Getting a Euro-Arab conversation going about young children’s media needs in an era of forced migration

Getting a Euro-Arab conversation going about young children’s media needs in an era of forced migration

Precedents for using young children’s screen content to promote diversity, inclusion, respect and understanding are surprisingly rare. The crisis of forced migration and the media needs of new arrivals and settled children call for a widely-targeted initiative. What practical screen content policies and production recommendations are best for giving children a voice and promoting their social engagement and future participation […]

Media and mental health: time to get serious?

In a response to a previous blog on this site about the Netflix TV series 13 Reasons Why, Richard Graham presents his perspective as a practising psychiatrist on the issues that it raised around media portrayal and reporting of suicide, and suicide more broadly. Richard argues that such debates present an important opportunity to create greater public awareness of the issues surrounding […]