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    Fake news and critical literacy: new findings, new questions

Fake news and critical literacy: new findings, new questions

The Commission on Fake News and the Teaching of Critical Literacy Skills recently published a report on fake news and critical literacy which surveyed schoolchildren and teachers. LSE PhD researcher Gianfranco Polizzi summarises the key findings of the report – which include that only 2% of children can spot fake news – and sets out his recommendations in response. [Header image credit: Y.C.V. Chow, […]

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    Media literacy – everyone’s favourite solution to the problems of regulation

Media literacy – everyone’s favourite solution to the problems of regulation

Media literacy is often cited as the solution – but to what problem? In this post Professor of Social Psychology at LSE and Chair of the LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission, Sonia Livingstone, provides an overview of the current debates about the benefits and limits of media literacy following a recent Westminster Media Forum seminar about fake news at which she spoke. [Header […]

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    Getting a Euro-Arab conversation going about young children’s media needs in an era of forced migration

Getting a Euro-Arab conversation going about young children’s media needs in an era of forced migration

Precedents for using young children’s screen content to promote diversity, inclusion, respect and understanding are surprisingly rare. The crisis of forced migration and the media needs of new arrivals and settled children call for a widely-targeted initiative. What practical screen content policies and production recommendations are best for giving children a voice and promoting their social engagement and future participation […]

Media and mental health: time to get serious?

In a response to a previous blog on this site about the Netflix TV series 13 Reasons Why, Richard Graham presents his perspective as a practising psychiatrist on the issues that it raised around media portrayal and reporting of suicide, and suicide more broadly. Richard argues that such debates present an important opportunity to create greater public awareness of the issues surrounding […]

Taking a second look at the learn-to-code craze

There is an idea in American politics and policy that computer programming is not only a fun and exciting activity, but a necessary skill for the jobs of the future. But who are the primary beneficiaries of programming and coding initiatives? In this post, Kate Miltner discusses the complex and historical relationship between technology and education. Kate is a PhD Candidate at the […]

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    3-and-a-half reasons why a TV show does not result in an increase in suicide attempts and ideation

3-and-a-half reasons why a TV show does not result in an increase in suicide attempts and ideation

Last summer, Netflix’s show 13 Reasons Why caused public concern about the risk of suicide contagion among teenagers – particularly in those who have suicidal thoughts. The show portrays the suicide and aftermath of a teenage girl who documents her reasons for the suicide in a series of audiotapes. Psychotherapists, school social workers and teachers expressed apprehension about the […]

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    What will the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) mean for children’s privacy and rights?

What will the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) mean for children’s privacy and rights?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which has attracted widespread attention and comment in recent weeks, comes into force on 25 May 2018. Sonia Livingstone, Professor of Social Psychology in LSE’s Department of Media and Communications, reflects on some of the challenges of the new rules as they relate to children, arguing that had children been consulted and their perspectives […]

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    Why you should talk to your children about Cambridge Analytica

Why you should talk to your children about Cambridge Analytica

Following the debates about data harvesting triggered by the Cambridge Analytica scandal, how can parents ensure that their children’s rights and needs online are protected? Amanda Third outlines how parents can set a good example with their own practices and work together with children to find better solutions. Amanda Third is associate professor and principal research fellow, Digital, Social […]

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    In the furore over adults’ data being exploited by social media companies, who looks out for the kids? New survey shows parents want more protection for their teens

In the furore over adults’ data being exploited by social media companies, who looks out for the kids? New survey shows parents want more protection for their teens

The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force next month, and proposes that companies should gain parental consent before processing the personal data of children under a certain age. But what do parents think that age should be? In this blogpost, LSE’s Sonia Livingstone and Kjartan Ólafsson of the University of Akureyri present findings from a new UK survey of parents with […]

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    For, and against, Facebook’s Messenger Kids: Part 2 – Against

For, and against, Facebook’s Messenger Kids: Part 2 – Against

In the second of two posts looking at the debates surrounding the new Facebook Messenger for Kids app, Alicia Blum-Ross outlines some of the concerns. She argues that we need to know more about whether the app will meet users’ real needs and offer the support that under-13s may require. She also asks if it will lead to more social […]