Research shows…

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    3-and-a-half reasons why a TV show does not result in an increase in suicide attempts and ideation

3-and-a-half reasons why a TV show does not result in an increase in suicide attempts and ideation

Last summer, Netflix’s show 13 Reasons Why caused public concern about the risk of suicide contagion among teenagers – particularly in those who have suicidal thoughts. The show portrays the suicide and aftermath of a teenage girl who documents her reasons for the suicide in a series of audiotapes. Psychotherapists, school social workers and teachers expressed apprehension about the […]

Contemporary child protection on the internet

On 25 May 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation comes into force in Europe. The technical tools designed for child protection often cannot keep pace with the rapid innovation of digital applications and in this post, Jutta Croll explores the complexities of keeping children safe online. Jutta is heading the project ‘Child Protection and Children’s Rights in the Digital World’, and is […]

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    Can we make our girls responsible for their safety online? Myths and facts about sex and the internet

Can we make our girls responsible for their safety online? Myths and facts about sex and the internet

While there is little evidence to show that teenagers face more risk of social harm online than they do offline, a study into the social media practices of teenagers in Spain has found that gender constitutes a trigger of risk in a society that blames women for the aggressions they suffer. This post asks how can such victim-blaming might […]

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    Competence or distraction: Why Indian parents view social media differently

Competence or distraction: Why Indian parents view social media differently

How do parents’ attitudes to social media use by their children change across socioeconomic classes in India? After conducting ethnographic fieldwork in Panchagrami, South India, Shriram Venkatraman discusses his findings about aspirations for social mobility, perspectives about social media, and differences between the higher and lower socioeconomic classes. Shriram has a PhD from University College London and currently with IIIT-Delhi, explores parents’ attitudes to social media use […]

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    Digital technology in school fails predictably – but is mandated anyway. Part 2: Towards a solution…

Digital technology in school fails predictably – but is mandated anyway. Part 2: Towards a solution…

The Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age project carried out an in-depth ethnography of the realities of digital technology across three contrasting Australian high schools. In the second of two posts, researcher Dr Selena Nemorin discusses how digital technology can be better used to improve communications between home and school, and support students’ learning in both environments. Selena Nemorin is a lecturer in sociology of […]

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    Digital technology in school fails predictably – but is mandated anyway. Part 1: Understanding the problem

Digital technology in school fails predictably – but is mandated anyway. Part 1: Understanding the problem

The ‘Everyday Schooling in the Digital Age’ project involved an in-depth ethnography of the realities of digital technology across three contrasting Australian high schools. In the first of two posts, researcher Dr Selena Nemorin explores some of the main findings, including differences between digital media use inside and outside the classroom and communication difficulties between home and school. The next post will look at […]

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    Advising on screen time in Australia: Is the evidence up to the task?

Advising on screen time in Australia: Is the evidence up to the task?

How do the Australian Department of Health and Ageing’s new screen time guidelines sit with the latest research about screen time? In this blog Jane Mavoa highlights the problems around a lack of robust evidence informing official guidelines. Policy falls behind the latest push to focus on content and context of screen time, rather than just quantity of hours.  Jane is a […]

Portuguese families facing the challenges of screen time

How are today’s young Portuguese children engaging with screens? How are parents balancing digital media in their children’s lives? In this post, Cristina Ponte, Teresa Sofia Castro, José Alberto Simões, Susana Batista and Ana Jorge show that many parents would rather have their children involved with other activities than watching TV, but that most parents also use screens as a way to keep […]

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    Sexual harassment at school: What can young people’s gender-based activism tell us?

Sexual harassment at school: What can young people’s gender-based activism tell us?

In the era of #MeToo it is important to connect how a mass feminist movement is generating change and affecting young people. In this post, Jessica Ringrose and Hannah Retallack discuss how important it is for researchers, policy makers and pressure groups alike to take stock and evaluate what schools, teachers and students are already doing to challenge sexism and gendered and sexual violence. Jessica is a Professor of […]

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    Maternal well-being and the internet: Balancing optimism and caution

Maternal well-being and the internet: Balancing optimism and caution

Globally, maternal well-being, including maternal mental health, is recognised to be critical for mothers, infants and families. The NHS  predicts that digital technology is going to play a crucial role in developing mental health services, but how much do we know about how mothers’ online practices link to their offline lives? In this blog, Ranjana Das explores the potential of […]