Gaming

Augmented reality apps: value beyond the hype?

Jackie Marsh discusses the research she conducted about augmented reality apps, investigating their use, value and potential for young children. She urges that as these apps become increasingly ubiquitous, it will be important for parents and early years practitioners to appraise and assess the apps and decide whether they are of fleeting interest, or if they hold the potential […]

Families and Pokémon GO

How does the popular game Pokémon GO provide active, educational and social screen time? Kiley Sobel presents interview data and tips for parents about the way in which Pokémon GO allows families to and engage with media together and to make meaningful connections with each other and the spaces around them. Kiley is a Ph.D. candidate and National Science […]

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    The content and context of screen use is more important that the amount of screen time

The content and context of screen use is more important that the amount of screen time

Mark Griffiths reflects on the realities, implications and consequences of “screen time” in the context of gaming. He argues that it is not about the amount of screen use, but rather about its content and context. His piece follows a special workshop¹ convened by the Media Policy Project and Parenting for a Digital Future on ‘Families and “screen-time”: challenges of media self-regulation’ and the publication of a […]

Do you ever grow out of digital parenting?

Lelia Green takes a closer look at how parents’ attitudes to children’s digital media use change as they move towards adulthood. Lelia is Professor of Communications in the School of Arts and Humanities, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia. Her current research investigates the different influences of parents and peers on young people’s internet use. [Header image credit: R. Pollard, CC BY 2.0]

Leslie Haddon’s […]

Do angry birds make for angry children?

Credit: P. Cuhalev, CC BY-NC 2.0

Guest contributor Christopher J. Ferguson  looks at research on video games, the problems around thin evidence and the grand claims it oftentimes makes. He examines what studies of children and gaming actually say – and here’s his list of take-home messages for parents. Christopher is an associate professor of psychology at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida. He has written numerous peer-reviewed […]

October 28th, 2015|Featured, On our minds|0 Comments|
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    Support children by supporting parents (because grown-ups need guidance too!): examples from Sweden

Support children by supporting parents (because grown-ups need guidance too!): examples from Sweden

Credit: J. Flinchbaugh, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Daniel Kardefelt-Winther looks at digital gaming and parental struggles to guide and protect their children in a digital world where one of the most popular activities is perceived as both beneficial and a cause for concern. Daniel is a post-doctoral researcher at the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, where he conducts research on […]

Learning more than Minecraft – A case from Jamaica

Credit: K. Jarrett, CC BY 2.0

Can Minecraft teach digital skills? Anthea Edalere-Henderson looks at how games such as Minecraft can help educate parents about the new digital worlds of their children. Anthea teaches in the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication (CARIMAC) at the University of the West Indies at Mona, Jamaica. Her work focuses on globalized forms of media […]

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    Parenting in Babylon – a Minecraft digital backyard in Australia

Parenting in Babylon – a Minecraft digital backyard in Australia

Credit for all images: Michael Dezuanni & Anna Whateley

Michael Dezuanni and Anna Whateley tell us about their own home, technology in family life and the role of Minecraft in teaching digital skills across generations. They both work at Queensland University of Technology, Michael is Deputy Director of the Children and Youth Research Centre, Anna teaches adolescent fiction and the sociology of education.

Minecraft […]

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    Not just playing games: Moving on from hobbies to digital jobs

Not just playing games: Moving on from hobbies to digital jobs

Julian Sefton-Green shares insights from his research on young people’s interest in digital technologies and how their formal and informal learning journeys helped them transformed their passions into genuine creative and digital opportunities. Julian is an independent scholar working in education and the cultural and creative industries. He is currently principal research fellow at the Department of Media & Communication, LSE, a research associate […]