Nov 21 2012

Chinese media soft power – the debate at LSE

I spent an hour  last Sunday in the London studios of CCTV, the Chinese state global broadcaster. I as there to be part of a panel debate chaired from their studio in Beijing about the crisis in the BBC. The other guest was a US journalist in Washington DC.
 
 
During the conversation I raised the issue of how accountable other international media organisations were – including CCTV. I also pointed out that social media like Twitter – banned in China – was helping to forge a new culture of scepticism about mainstream media amongst publics around the world. of course, the programme wasn’t shown in China but I do think it is interesting that we can now have that debate on a Chinese media platform.
 
China is spending billions spreading its message around the world through platforms like CCTV. And, of course, global media has been covering the recent Chinese leadership conference in Beijing which ushers in a new era – or not – of Chinese political development. So it is a good time for us to have a debate at Polis about Chinese media and it’s international influence. Please join us – it’s free and open to all.
 
 
“China and the Mediation of Soft Power,”  is part of the POLIS Media Agenda Talks series. We will explore the ways China is communicating soft power, how it is received by its global audience, and its relevance in a multi-polar world and what is being billed as the Asian Century.
 
The event will be held on Tuesday, 27 November 2012, from 5-6:30pmat the New Theatre (East Building) on Houghton Street, London WC2B (see map: http://tinyurl.com/EAS171)
 
 
Our panelists:
Dr Xin Xin from the University of Westminster’s China Media Centre, is a former Beijing-based journalist and is author of How the Market is Changing China’s Newsand the upcoming book  China’s Soft Power.
 
Sun Shuyun, a special China advisor to the Institute of Strategic Dialogue, is the author and director of a number of critically acclaimed books and documentaries, including the BBC series A Year in Tibet and the book of the same name.
 
 
Nie Weiliang is a senior producer for the BBC’s Chinese service. He has been covering China for more than 20 years from both inside and outside the mainland.
 
Email Polis@lse.ac.uk for more details or to reserve a seat
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