Democracy

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    What can we learn about getting people involved in politics from the Scottish referendum? (Video)

What can we learn about getting people involved in politics from the Scottish referendum? (Video)

I have been on Sky News talking about what we can learn from the Scottish referendum about getting people interested in politics.

You can watch the video by clicking on the photo below.

I was in debate with James Bloodworth from LeftFootForward blog.

Top lines from me?

Social media is a great tool but you need to give people a clear decision on […]

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Do Voting Advice Applications have a future?

This is the third of a series of articles about Voting Advice Applications.  Read the first one here and the second here.

 VAAs are digital devices that try to help citizens think about how they might decide to vote in an election. They might be websites, apps or any other online format that you could access via a desktop, laptop, […]

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    Permalink How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?
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    How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?

How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?

This was my submission to the Political and Constitutional Reform Select Committee inquiry into ‘Voter Engagement’. My paper was focused, of course, on the role of media. I am trying to convince politicians that they need to emulate the way that journalism has fostered engagement with the public, but go further, for example not just using twitter to promote […]

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Better To Be A Cat: How to be a political journalist

This article by Spectator assistant editor Isabel Hardman is based on a talk she gave at Polis, LSE. In it she explains what it’s like to be a Westminster lobby journalist, how to get scoops and what it takes to be a political correspondent in one of the world’s most competitive news beats. She argues that starting out on a very […]

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Does it matter that no-one reports on Parliament anymore?

Has Parliament completely lost its role as the national debating chamber? And did opening it up to broadcast media hasten the decline? Apart from the Queen’s Speech, the Budget, PMQs, occasional set-piece such debates about going to war, and celebrity appearances before Select Committees, the House of Commons (let alone the Lords) is barely covered by mainstream newspapers or broadcast […]

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Strange fascination: image in music and politics Part Two

This is part two of  an essay by, LSE Media PhD student Ruth Garland that explores the links between our experience of  images and political communication. With democracy suffering a crisis of confidence she questions the relationship between images and political meaning through the ages. In the first part she explored the political significance of David Bowie’s images and their relationship with his […]

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Reputation And Accountability: Where Are The Checks And Balances With Social Media?

How have changes in the media landscape have affected the practice of reputation management? Public Relations Executive Tim Burt says that the proliferation of social media has greatly limited the amount of editorial control that can be exercised over the dissemination of information. Burt argues that social media have eroded the system of “checks and balances” that historically governed […]

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Who is winning the information war: security services or the new disruptive journalists?

Like a lot of people I objected to the treatment of David Miranda at the hands of the UK security officials and I was worried by the pressure put on The Guardian, as related by editor Alan Rusbridger. But I am not so sure about the Orwellian conspiracy/victim framing of the narrative by some on the open Internet side of […]

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The Village Cycle: how political news changes when it speeds up

Danny Boyle might have shown it thus at the Olympic Opening Ceremony in one of his nostalgic tableaux of British history: A delivery boy in hobnail boots wobbles over the village green on a heavy framed bicycle, laden down with sacks of newspapers balanced precariously on his handle-bars. Citizens in tartan dressing gowns clutching mugs of tea lean down to their […]

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September 7th, 2012|Journalism, Politics|2 Comments|

The balance of crowds: top-down and bottom-up mobilization strategies in Russian election campaign (guest blog)

Polis Silverstone Scholar Gregory Asmolov reports from Moscow on the anti-Putin protests and discovers how Russians are re-inventing democratic activism. I was seating at “Shokoladnitza” Café, a popular coffee network in Russia, with a cup of latte.  Next table to me two young parents were dressing their 3 year old daughter.“We are going to a place where everyone will put […]

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