Do Voting Advice Applications have a future?

This is the third of a series of articles about Voting Advice Applications.  Read the first one here and the second here.

 VAAs are digital devices that try to help citizens think about how they might decide to vote in an election. They might be websites, apps or any other online format that you could access via a desktop, laptop, […]

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    Permalink Photo courtesy of Keith Ivey, accessed on FlickrGallery

    An introduction to Voting Advice Applications (VAA) and their potential influence and effects

An introduction to Voting Advice Applications (VAA) and their potential influence and effects

Introduction by Charlie Beckett, Director, Polis, LSE

Voting Advice Applications are digital devices that try to help citizens think about how they might decide to vote in an election. They might be websites, apps or any other online format that you could access via a desktop, laptop, tablet or mobile connected device. They are a niche digital product but they […]

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    Permalink How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?
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    How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?

How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?

This was my submission to the Political and Constitutional Reform Select Committee inquiry into ‘Voter Engagement’. My paper was focused, of course, on the role of media. I am trying to convince politicians that they need to emulate the way that journalism has fostered engagement with the public, but go further, for example not just using twitter to promote […]

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St George Farage and the mainstream party dragons: political communication in the age of austerity

In the not so distant past if we were discussing political communications trends we might talk about Facebook and Barack Obama, or Twitter and #IagreewithNick’. Today I want to look at Nigel Farage and the George and Dragon pub. [You can see the slides for this talk here] There are thousands of media scholars out there analysing Occupy Wall Street […]

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Kenyan elections and the media: complex illusions (guest blog)

LSE  researcher Nick Benequista is researching networked journalism in East Africa. Here’s his take from Nairobi on the complexities of media coverage of the tightly-contested Kenyan elections. The national elections last week revealed an uneasy relationship between Kenyans and the mass media. Kenyans have been given an unsatisfactory choice between the half-truths of the foreign press and the illusions of […]

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Some media-related questions after Obama’s victory

Some media-related questions after Obama’s victory. (Some of these are stupid, some rhetorical, and the list will grow) Please feel free to suggest more via @CharlieBeckett or in the comments. 1. Why do political journalists still treat campaigns like theatre or sport when it is now maths? (cf Nate Silver)

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November 7th, 2012|Politics|4 Comments|

The Iran Distraction: a view from Israel on Palestine and the elections

Polis Intern Phoebe Amoroso reports on a talk by veteran Israeli political journalist Emmanuel Rosen, currently Chief Political Correspondent for Israel TV Channel 2.  With tensions escalating between Israel and Iran as the international community watches anxiously on, it’s a good time to hear direct from someone at the heart of Israeli media. On January 22nd next year, Israel will […]

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Sex, money and power: reporting America for Al Jazeera (guest blog with audio report)

It has been said that the two aspects of life most often lied about are sex and money – a stereotype that Zeina Awad  co-host of Al Jazeera English’s flagship American current affairs programme, Fault Lines, knows all too well. (This report by Polis intern, Lauren Maffeo – there is an excellent audio package about Al Jazeera based on this […]

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The balance of crowds: top-down and bottom-up mobilization strategies in Russian election campaign (guest blog)

Polis Silverstone Scholar Gregory Asmolov reports from Moscow on the anti-Putin protests and discovers how Russians are re-inventing democratic activism. I was seating at “Shokoladnitza” Café, a popular coffee network in Russia, with a cup of latte.  Next table to me two young parents were dressing their 3 year old daughter.“We are going to a place where everyone will put […]

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Russian Elections: the struggle for power between state and network society

New media technologies are having a interesting impact in places where we thought political communications had become bogged down. One of them was Russia As Polis Silverstone Scholar Gregory Asmolov explains, both activists and the Russian state are using digital technologies in ways that is changing the terms of democratic debate and the struggle for control over information. Here Gregory […]

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