Financial journalism

Should journalists write about companies they own shares in? In Hong Kong they do. (New publication)

Major scandals involving business journalists are rare, but they do happen. In London, journalists on the infamous Daily Mirror City Slickers column were found guilty of market manipulation in 2005 In an infamous case in New York, Foster Winans was convicted of insider trading back in 1985. And periodic questions are raised about behaviour that whilst not criminal may be […]

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Crash! Slump! Bust! Reporting the economic crisis (guest blog) #Polis12

“How many of you have heard of a CDS?” A smattering of hands shot up into the air when Bloomberg News’ Economics Editor Linda Yueh asked who knew what a credit default swap was at the POLIS International Journalism Conference . (This report by Polis Intern Wanda O’Brien) Accurately defining technical jargon in layman’s terms is one of the principle […]

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March 30th, 2012|Journalism|0 Comments|

Media and the Financial Crisis: Could the public have been better informed?

This is a preliminary report on a Polis seminar on financial journalism featuring Howard Davies (LSE Director), Damian Tambini (LSE Media and Comms), Dean Starkman (Columbia University), Stephen Shefferes (City University), Aeron Davis (Goldsmiths University) John Lloyd (Financial Times/Oxford University) and others. By Polis Intern, Sakshi Ojha Did the business media fail to adequately cover the financial crisis? Could the […]

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September 28th, 2010|Research|0 Comments|

Financial Journalism: what are we going to do about it?

Why didn’t they see it coming? Why didn’t the financial media tell us that capitalism was about to implode? How can it help us through the current climate of cuts and austerity? Since 2008 Financial journalism has had a lot of questions to answer. That’s why we do research on it at Polis [indeed we have a seminar on September […]

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September 16th, 2010|Uncategorized|4 Comments|

Budget News Blues: What Do We Know?

  Today is Budget Day in the UK so I awake with an (ex-)editor’s forboding. I know this is the most important budget for decades but like all major financial statements I know the story will be a) boring and b) wrong. I am sure the papers and broadcasters will do a stirling job in selling this story. They will […]

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April 22nd, 2009|Journalism|0 Comments|

Don’t shoot the messenger: media and the economic crisis

Who would have predicted two years ago that a debate on financial journalism would fill a 450-seat theatre on a Monday night? When I first commissioned a research report on economic media back in early 2007 I had no idea that it would be published amidst the biggest financial story of our lives. It is a story that people want told […]

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Why Did Nobody See It Coming? Reporting The Crash -The Debate (Monday February 23rd)

Join Evan Davis (BBC), Alex Brummer (Mail), Vince Cable MP (Lib Dems) Willem Buiter (LSE) and our chairman is Howard Davies (LSE) to debate how the media has covered the financial crisis, tonight in the Old Theatre, Houghton Street, LSE at 6.30pm.

It is free,but get there by 6.15pm because it is proving very popular. We have partnered with the Media […]

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February 23rd, 2009|Research|0 Comments|

African business journalism: a vital sector

Here in the West there is much debate about the standard of our financial journalism, but there are still some places where business reporting struggles to survive at all.

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February 16th, 2009|International|0 Comments|

What Is Financial Journalism For? (Columbia Journalism Review of Polis Report)

Dean Starkman has a fascinating piece in the Columbia Journalism Review which dissects the recent Polis report on financial journalism. I am glad to read that Dean rates the research by Dr Damian Tambini but in doing so he makes some interesting comparisons between the way that US and UK media have reflected upon their performance the present economic crisis.

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January 28th, 2009|Research|0 Comments|

Treasury MPs to tackle financial reporting

The Treasury Select Committee is to discuss the reporting of the biggest story of 2008 and what will continue to be the biggest story of 2009. No, not Gaza, I mean the banking crisis.

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January 5th, 2009|Research|0 Comments|