guest blog

Media and murderers – a case of confusion? (guest blog)

Generally, the British press takes a tough line on ‘law and order’ and sentencing. This is often criticised by liberals as prejudicial to fair legal process. But in this article, LSE student Ross Longton argues that the media has too much power overall in influencing public attitudes to criminals, a power that can even be to the detriment of those who […]

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October 28th, 2014|Student blogs|0 Comments|

Pommy media causing a stir in Australia

 

The Australian media landscape is becoming a little heated as recent British entrants continue to carve out new digital territory in the Land Down Under. Colleen Murrell reports on the increasing levels of distrust both between the players – The Australian versions of The Guardian, the Daily Mail and the BBC – and between those players and the tough […]

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Better To Be A Cat: How to be a political journalist

This article by Spectator assistant editor Isabel Hardman is based on a talk she gave at Polis, LSE. In it she explains what it’s like to be a Westminster lobby journalist, how to get scoops and what it takes to be a political correspondent in one of the world’s most competitive news beats. She argues that starting out on a very […]

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How the news media both shadows and magnifies feminism

When Laura Bates from #Everydaysexism gave her presentation at LSE Polis Summer School, I felt so ‘echoed’. Those obscene sexual harassments, both visible and invisible, have happened to me and my friends in various forms.  This article by Polis Summer School student Yinan Che. At the time we felt disgusted and helpless. We raged about it together and then several days […]

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“Stronger than corruption, mistakes and lies”: being political and right wing in France (guest blog)

“You know for a right-leaning person, you are surprisingly nice”. If I had been given one euro for every single time I heard this sentence, today I would probably be a billionaire. I am French. I am nineteen. I am right-leaning. And this simple fact has caused me many problems, created me many enemies amongst my peers, and sometimes lost me […]

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Between personal and public interests: a look back at the impact of Snowden and WikiLeaks (guest blog)

This article by Polis Summer School student Luciana Amaral. Phone tracking systems, computer hacking, surveillance state and social network spying. It looks like the plot of a science fiction movie, but according to Eric King, Privacy International’s Head of Research, at the LSE Polis Summer School, this has somehow become the reality in many countries around the world. The lack […]

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Copy Approval – a clash of journalism and citizen ethics between Sweden and Britain?

”The story took a year to work out. It was never told before, less so published. The subject was sensitive and the people interviewed were vulnerable, so I had to compromise a little.” What compromising did Sarah Morrison, then a journalist at The Independent have to do? What ethical short-cut did this morally-motivated reporter (who now works for Global Witness, a […]

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“Gunman at Yale” So worth tweeting! How ‘citizen journalists’ can turn a drama into a crisis on social media

Last year, on the first day of Thanksgiving break, I was sleeping in my dorm room at Yale when I got waken up by a phone call from school: there was allegedly a gunman on campus. That was only three months after I went to the United States, and I couldn’t believe what I used to see on TV was actually […]

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The beautification of photojournalism

This article by Polis Summer School student Aylin Elci. As the cliche goes, “a photo is worth a thousand words”, but what are consequences of using “pretty”, “highly aesthetic” or “artistic” photos to convey the reality of war? In 1972, Pulitzer-prize-awardee-to-be Nick Ut immortalized a nine-year-old Vietnamese girl running away from a cloud of napalm in a world-renowned photo. At that […]

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War reporting from afar: covering the covert drone war

This post is by Polis Summer School Student Carmen Zheng Prior to the 1990-91 Gulf War, a journalist coined the term The Powell Doctrine, named after then Joint Chiefs of Staff Colin Powell. Vowing to utilize every resource and tool available against the enemy to minimize United States casualties, The Powell Doctrine has been successful in being the driving force […]

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