politics

  • The greatest interviewer ever up against the hardest person to interview according to Dimbleby
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    Where next for the (broadcast) political interview? David Dimbleby looks back and forward

Where next for the (broadcast) political interview? David Dimbleby looks back and forward

It all went wrong with the introduction of the sofa. Once politicians had the option of a cozy chat with comfy pillows, then the gladiatorial combat of the traditional broadcast interview was dead.

That is the core message from David Dimbleby’s thoughtful lecture on the art of the political interview, given to celebrate the 90th birthday of the psephology legend […]

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    We need to look at other parliamentary democracies for ideas about how to run televised debates

We need to look at other parliamentary democracies for ideas about how to run televised debates

Among a number of political ramifications, the recent UKIP by-election success in Clacton has raised tough questions about the organization of televised debates during the 2015 general election campaign. LSE’s Nick Anstead looks to Germany and Canada for more inclusive models that the UK could follow. This post is a repost of an article that originally appeared on the […]

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Do the media control our minds?

This graph, from the publishers of Owen Jones’ book about the Establishment very clearly illustrates how biased British newspapers have brainwashed Britons into adopting right-wing beliefs that don’t match reality. Or does it?

Jones makes an argument that is shared across much of the political spectrum. There are even conservatives, who supposedly benefit from this, who make the same claim. But […]

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    What can we learn about getting people involved in politics from the Scottish referendum? (Video)

What can we learn about getting people involved in politics from the Scottish referendum? (Video)

I have been on Sky News talking about what we can learn from the Scottish referendum about getting people interested in politics.

You can watch the video by clicking on the photo below.

I was in debate with James Bloodworth from LeftFootForward blog.

Top lines from me?

Social media is a great tool but you need to give people a clear decision on […]

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    Designing a VAA: Selecting questions as a crucial part of the process

Designing a VAA: Selecting questions as a crucial part of the process

This is the second of a series of articles about Voting Advice Applications. Read the first one here.

VAAs are digital devices that try to help citizens think about how they might decide to vote in an election. They might be websites, apps or any other online format that you could access via a desktop, laptop, tablet or mobile connected […]

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    Permalink How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?
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    How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?

How can we use media to get people more engaged in politics?

This was my submission to the Political and Constitutional Reform Select Committee inquiry into ‘Voter Engagement’. My paper was focused, of course, on the role of media. I am trying to convince politicians that they need to emulate the way that journalism has fostered engagement with the public, but go further, for example not just using twitter to promote […]

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Better To Be A Cat: How to be a political journalist

This article by Spectator assistant editor Isabel Hardman is based on a talk she gave at Polis, LSE. In it she explains what it’s like to be a Westminster lobby journalist, how to get scoops and what it takes to be a political correspondent in one of the world’s most competitive news beats. She argues that starting out on a very […]

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“Stronger than corruption, mistakes and lies”: being political and right wing in France (guest blog)

“You know for a right-leaning person, you are surprisingly nice”. If I had been given one euro for every single time I heard this sentence, today I would probably be a billionaire. I am French. I am nineteen. I am right-leaning. And this simple fact has caused me many problems, created me many enemies amongst my peers, and sometimes lost me […]

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The secret to good political reporting: patience

Report by Polis Summer School student Rayhan Uddin Walking the corridors of Parliament, brushing shoulders with politicians and hacks, coffees and lunches with highly influential people, receiving inside information from anonymous sources to earn yourself the political scoop of the day. It’s the stuff of aspiring journalists’ dreams. However, as Isabel Hardman explained in her lecture to the LSE Polis Summer […]

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The Kashmiri conundrum: why is ‘the world’s largest democracy’ rated so poorly for press freedoms? (guest blog)

As voters go to the polls in Indian-administered Kashmir, freelance journalist Mark Mistry looks at how the Indian media’s treatment of the region’s fiercely disputed status, coupled with violations of press freedoms by the state’s security forces, has contributed to its poor reputation. A recent BBC World Service portrait of India’s press reported that ‘the business of news is killing the profession […]

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