In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books on politics. Each Sunday we publish three new reviews, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Book Review: Big Ideas in Macroeconomics: A Nontechnical View by Kartik B. Athreya

Book Review: Big Ideas in Macroeconomics: A Nontechnical View by Kartik B. Athreya

In this book, Kartik B. Athreya aims to offer a nontechnical description of prominent ideas and models in macroeconomics, arguing for their value as interpretive tools as well as their policy relevance. Anna Grodecka finds that the book has much more to offer those interested in microeconomics and recommends this useful read to economics researchers and students.

This review was originally published […]

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    Book Review: Britishness, Popular Music and National Identity by Irene Morra

Book Review: Britishness, Popular Music and National Identity by Irene Morra

Irene Morra offers a major exploration of the social and cultural importance of popular music to contemporary celebrations of Britishness. This book represents a valuable contribution to the corpus of academic literature on both popular music and national identity, and would be a welcome addition to the reading lists of scholars and students of History, Music and English Literature, as well […]

Book Review: The BRIC Road to Growth by Jim O’Neill

We all know the BRIC countries, but what about the MINTs? In this book economist Jim O’Neill considers how by 2050 Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey could collectively account for around 10% of world GDP. The changes described in this book are game changers: not only will they affect the lives of almost everybody alive between now and 2050, they will […]

Book Review: Gender and Global Justice by Alison M. Jaggar

Alison Jaggar aims to bring gender to the centre of philosophical debates about global justice with this recent collection of essays. Chapters cover geographies of gender and migration, taxation and global justice, and sexual violence in an international context, amongst other issues central to our understanding of what justice means today. Although Gender and Global Justice is not altogether timely, the book still […]

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    Book Review: The Global Land Grab: Beyond the Hype, edited by Mayke Kaag and Annelies Zoomers

Book Review: The Global Land Grab: Beyond the Hype, edited by Mayke Kaag and Annelies Zoomers

The last two years have seen a huge amount of academic, policy-making and media interest in the increasingly contentious issue of land grabbing – the large-scale acquisition of land in the global South. It is a phenomenon against which locals seem defenseless, and one about which multilateral organizations such as the World Bank as well as civil-society organizations and […]

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    Book Review: Education, Social Background and Cognitive Ability: The Decline of the Social by Gary N. Marks

Book Review: Education, Social Background and Cognitive Ability: The Decline of the Social by Gary N. Marks

In this book, Gary N. Marks argues that the influence of socioeconomic background for education is moderate and most often declining, and that it has only very weak impacts on adults’ occupation and earnings after taking into account education and cognitive ability. This book affords an alternative and at times quite radical opinion to the seemingly endless debate of how to […]

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    Book Review: Governing Britain: Power Politics and the Prime Minister by Patrick Diamond

Book Review: Governing Britain: Power Politics and the Prime Minister by Patrick Diamond

In this book, Patrick Diamond examines the administrative and political machinery serving the Prime Minister, and considers how it evolved from the early years of New Labour to the election of the Coalition Government in 2010. The author attempts to provide an analysis which considers the continuing power of the civil service, the tensions between permanent officials and political […]

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    Book Review: When Soldiers Say No: Selective Conscientious Objection in the Modern Military, edited by Andrea Ellner et al.

Book Review: When Soldiers Say No: Selective Conscientious Objection in the Modern Military, edited by Andrea Ellner et al.

When Soldiers Say No brings together arguments for and against selective conscientious objection, as well as case studies examining how different countries deal with those who claim the status of selective conscientious objectors. This collection adds considerably to the literature by bringing together a range of perspectives on the merits of selective conscientious objection, as well as consideration of its […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.