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    Book Review: Britishness, Popular Music and National Identity by Irene Morra

Book Review: Britishness, Popular Music and National Identity by Irene Morra

Irene Morra offers a major exploration of the social and cultural importance of popular music to contemporary celebrations of Britishness. This book represents a valuable contribution to the corpus of academic literature on both popular music and national identity, and would be a welcome addition to the reading lists of scholars and students of History, Music and English Literature, as well […]

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    Book Review: Cultural Policy: Management, Value and Modernity in the Creative Industries by Dave O’Brien

Book Review: Cultural Policy: Management, Value and Modernity in the Creative Industries by Dave O’Brien

Drawing on a range of case studies, including analysis of the reality of work in the creative industries, urban regeneration and current government cultural policy in the UK, this book discusses the idea of value in the cultural sector, showing how value plays out in cultural organizations. Ruth Adams finds that Dave O’Brien’s contribution functions effectively as a primer on the […]

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    Book Review: At Power’s Elbow: Aides to the Prime Minister from Robert Walpole to David Cameron by Andrew Blick and George Jones

Book Review: At Power’s Elbow: Aides to the Prime Minister from Robert Walpole to David Cameron by Andrew Blick and George Jones

Special Advisers and prime-ministerial aides have come to prominence increasingly over the last decade, with operatives like Alastair Campbell and Andy Coulson frequently making front-page news. But little is generally known about the role itself, what it entails, and how it has developed down the years. Catherine Haddon, in reviewing this new offering from Andrew Blick and George Jones, finds their history of the […]

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    Book Review: Transparency in Politics and the Media: Accountability and Open Government

Book Review: Transparency in Politics and the Media: Accountability and Open Government

Governments around the world are increasingly experimenting with initiatives in transparency or ‘open government’, including more user-friendly government websites, greater access to government data, the extension of freedom of information legislation and broader attempts to involve the public in government decision making. This volume aims to analyse the challenges and opportunities presented to journalists as they attempt to hold governments accountable […]

Book Review: Slow Reading in a Hurried Age by David Mikics

In this fast-paced world where everything is just a ‘click away’, more and more readers are choosing to ‘skim and skip’ rather than to give their full attention to the written word, believes David Mikics. This book aims to demonstrate how the ‘tried-and-true methods’ of slow reading can provide a more immersive and fulfilling experience. The author’s writing is fluent and passionate […]

Book Review: Propaganda, Power and Persuasion: From World War One to Wikileaks by David Welch

In this book, the contributors set out to trace the development of techniques of opinion management from the First World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan. Michael Warren finds that this book makes valuable contributions to a rich body of literature critiquing how leaders, media and other entities shape public opinion, whilst being accessible and thought-provoking to readers new to the subject. This review […]

Book Review: The Documentary Film Book edited by Brian Winston

The Documentary Film Book presents a series of essays in one volume where key international scholars come together to offer compelling evidence as to why, over the last few decades, documentary has come to the centre of screen studies. While there is much historical revisionism in the book, there is also much to interest those more focussed on the contemporary, writes Fiona Chesterton.  […]

Book Review: Wicked Intelligence: Visual Art and the Science of Experiment in Restoration London

In late seventeenth-century London, the most provocative images were produced not by artists, but by scientists. Magnified fly-eyes drawn with the aid of microscopes, apparitions cast on laboratory walls by projection machines, cut-paper figures revealing the “exact proportions” of sea monsters—all were created by members of the Royal Society of London, the leading institutional platform of the early Scientific Revolution. […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.