• 2011 census
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    The concept of ethnicity has not much science about it and is no less imposed than other social categories

The concept of ethnicity has not much science about it and is no less imposed than other social categories

Most reviews of research about ethnicity claim it is a concept more scientific than race, and less imposed by those with power. Ludi Simpson reviews recent research about the reliability of ethnicity data drawn from the decennial UK census and reflects on their purpose. Although stable and reliable data is needed to help implement policies of equality and appropriate services, […]

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    There are plenty of things the Chancellor could be doing to halt the growth of inequality and help some of the 13 million people living in poverty in the UK today

There are plenty of things the Chancellor could be doing to halt the growth of inequality and help some of the 13 million people living in poverty in the UK today

In his Budget, George Osborne claimed inequality is at its lowest level in 28 years. Yet recent research by Oxfam highlights this statement hides a more nuanced and worrying picture. Rachael Orr argues that if the Chancellor is serious about halting the growth of inequality he needs to start listening to some of the 13 million people living in […]

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    Low voter turnout is clearly a problem, but a much greater worry is the growing inequality of that turnout

Low voter turnout is clearly a problem, but a much greater worry is the growing inequality of that turnout

The UK is very much a ‘divided democracy’, with electoral participation among the young and the poor declining dramatically. This political estrangement will not be curtailed by quick fixes or technological solutions. We should be looking to adopt a fundamentally deeper, richer and more creative approach to democratic engagement. In particular, we need a long-term plan for fostering political […]

The re-glazed glass ceiling: After a decade of concerted progress the lack of diversity in Whitehall is again in the headlines

Only two years ago people were talking of a ‘smashed glass ceiling’ in relation to women’s representation in Whitehall. But female representation has stalled since 2010 as a result of austerity and the failure to prioritise the diversity agenda in recruitment. Daniel Fitzpatrick, Claire Annesley, Francesca Gains and Dave Richards argue that if gender equality in the Senior Civil Service […]

Money makes people right-wing and inegalitarian

Rich people typically lean right politically. Are they motivated by deeply moral views or self-interest? Andrew J Oswald and Nick Powdthavee argue that money makes you right-wing. It shows that lottery winners in the UK are more likely to switch their allegiance from left to right. Why are you right-wing, left-wing, or in the middle? You probably believe that you made […]

By altering workplace power relationships and employers’ incentives, minimum wage laws help ensure social equality

Egalitarian liberals have long been sceptical about a minimum wage, arguing that taxation and transfer programs are better at ensuring distributive justice. But even if we accept the claim that the minimum wage increases unemployment, there are grounds for the minimum wage on the basis of justice. Brishen Rogers argues that it helps reduce work-based class and status divisions. Labour markets and the […]

More women in Government: time for gender quotas

The current Government is notably male dominated, with both coalition partners having historical difficulties in attracting talented women to their ranks. This under-representation of women has a number of undesirable consequences, including largely shutting half the population out of the policymaking process. Claire Annesley argues that gender quotas in the executive would be the best way to remedy this problem, and help bring […]

Reforms to our social and political institutions could go a considerable way toward reviving declining levels of participation

There has been a striking link between falling voter turnout and declining confidence in politicians as a group. Sarah Birch advocates reforms designed to change popular engagement with politics, such as allowing 16 year-olds to vote, a more robust citizenship education programme, and making voting compulsory for first-time voters.  Political inclusion is the essence of democracy. The ideal of inclusiveness is […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.