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    While there is evidence that workless spells are associated across generations, the ‘culture of welfare dependency’ argument does not hold

While there is evidence that workless spells are associated across generations, the ‘culture of welfare dependency’ argument does not hold

There is little hard evidence on the extent to which the ‘curse’ of intergenerational worklessness exists and what might be driving it. Research by Lindsey Macmillan finds that though the problem is overstated, there is indeed evidence of individuals from workless families churning in and out of the labour market at a more frequent rate to those from employed families. […]

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    With nearly 1 million unemployed youths in the UK, new policy proposals aimed at tackling the issue are necessary

With nearly 1 million unemployed youths in the UK, new policy proposals aimed at tackling the issue are necessary

The government’s policies aimed at tackling youth unemployment in the UK have so far been disappointing: wage incentive payments have had little impact and there has been less uptake of the government’s apprenticeship scheme than targeted. Thankfully Nick Clegg has recently come out with new proposals that will contribute to tackling some of the structural issues behind stubbornly high youth […]

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    The link between unemployment and domestic violence is not what you might expect

The link between unemployment and domestic violence is not what you might expect

Contrary to popular belief, the incidence of domestic violence in Britain does not seem to have risen during the recession. But according to research by Jonathan Wadsworth and colleagues, men and women have experienced different risks of unemployment – and these have had contrasting effects on the level of physical abuse. Domestic violence hurts. Aside from the obvious physical and psychological harm to the victims, it also damages the economy. […]

Why improved support for people with mental health conditions can help economic recovery

While the UK has shown progress in acknowledging the relationship between mental health and unemployment, the extent of implementation of support interventions is lacking, writes Karen Steadman. Considering the high-costs associated with mental disabilities, improving support for those with conditions would have significant economic benefits. In recent weeks we’ve seen a steady trickle of news anticipating that economic recovery is in sight. Though […]

By altering workplace power relationships and employers’ incentives, minimum wage laws help ensure social equality

Egalitarian liberals have long been sceptical about a minimum wage, arguing that taxation and transfer programs are better at ensuring distributive justice. But even if we accept the claim that the minimum wage increases unemployment, there are grounds for the minimum wage on the basis of justice. Brishen Rogers argues that it helps reduce work-based class and status divisions. Labour markets and the […]

The euro should either be made growth and employment friendly as fast as possible, or it should be dismantled

Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides was once a passionate believer in the benefits of European monetary union. He now thinks that either the euro should be dismantled or the direction of economic policy dramatically reversed so as to promote growth and jobs and avoid creating a lost generation of educated young people. This article was originally published on LSE’s EUROPP blog. […]

Machiavellian chutzpah, eternal austerity and ‘green taxes’: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

“In an act of brazen Machiavellian chutzpah mixed with untold naivety”, writes Thom Brooks on The Conversation, “the [Conservative] party has tried to erase records of speeches and press releases published between 2000 and its coming to power in [2010].” They didn’t realise that to delete content permanently from the internet would be near impossible.

Commenting on David Cameron’s call for permanent […]

The Bank of England’s inflation report and what it means for the unemployment rate

As expected, the MPC revised upwards its GDP growth forecasts and predicted a return of the unemployment rate to the 7% threshold 18 months earlier than it previously thought. Costas Milas argues that despite the rising economic optimism and better economic data, unemployment might still take until the second quarter of 2016 to return to 7%. In August 2013, the Bank […]

November 13th, 2013|Costas Milas|1 Comment|

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.