Artemis Photiadou

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So far Artemis Photiadou has created 802 entries.

Four reasons why welfare reform is a delusion

Reforming the welfare system has been a key aim of British government since 2010. Richard Machin writes that the concept makes no economic sense, it does not produce the outcomes the government is seeking, all while the UK is actually spending less on welfare than countries with comparable economies.

Back in 2010, the coalition government stated that welfare reform is […]

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    How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

Considering the turnaround in fortunes during and after the 2017 general election, why didn’t Labour win? The answer is to be found both in the Labour party’s governance, and in the whole system of British government, explains Ed Straw.

Given the dire display of their government opponents, some have asked the legitimate question: why did Labour not win? Let’s start […]

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    Tim Farron’s resignation and the hidden limits of liberalism

Tim Farron’s resignation and the hidden limits of liberalism

Tim Farron explained that his resignation was due to his conservative Christian beliefs having hampered the liberal views of his party. Paula Zoido Oses analyses this argument and explains how liberalism can work in public life.

Tim Farron,recently stepped down as the leader of the Liberal Democrats due to a conflict between his Christian Faith and the liberal values defended […]

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    How the government has prioritised administrative convenience over child support

How the government has prioritised administrative convenience over child support

The Child Maintenance Service exists to calculate and ensure payment for those who struggle to receive child support. But despite extensive reforms, the service still allows many parents to pay a fraction of what they can afford, writes Sumi Rabindrakumar. Rather than tackle the system’s long-standing loopholes, policymakers have preferred a system that is cheap and simple to deliver […]

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    Scottish leaders’ debates on Twitter: Sturgeon, Davidson, and ‘indyref2’ dominated proceedings

Scottish leaders’ debates on Twitter: Sturgeon, Davidson, and ‘indyref2’ dominated proceedings

As the dust begins to settle on the 2017 General Election campaign, Graeme Baxter, Simon Burnett, John Isaacs, Iain MacLeod, Sarah Pedersen, and Elizabeth Tait reflect upon the Twitter response to the two televised Scottish leaders’ debates held in the lead-up to polling day.

Continuing a longitudinal study that has previously investigated Twitter response to televised debates during the 2014 […]

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    Homes fit for 21st century heroes: the past and future of UK housing policy

Homes fit for 21st century heroes: the past and future of UK housing policy

For over a century, housing has shaped British political economy and has both consolidated and divided the two major parties, writes Ewan Gibbs. He outlines the centrality of housing policies in British history, and argues that strategic adjustments will be key in adapting future policy to popular morality and structural economic forces.

From Lloyd George’s infamous call for a government […]

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    A year since the UK voted to take back control – but control of what?

A year since the UK voted to take back control – but control of what?

The referendum was all about ‘taking back control’ from Brussels. The idea resonated among voters not only because of migration policy, but due to a lack of control over economic and democratic matters, argues Sarah Longlands. With the first anniversary of the referendum, we need to rethink how we approach ‘control’.

The central argument of the ‘Vote leave’ campaign during […]

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    Value for money over value for people: how material politics can perpetuate inequality

Value for money over value for people: how material politics can perpetuate inequality

Social inequality in housing is a pressing issue that takes on a material dimension. To start tackling it, we need to rethink how we talk about housing and design, writes Mona Sloane. She explains how under current processes, attempts to improve the building stock often end up perpetuating wider social inequality.

The tragedy of Grenfell Tower continues to expose the […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.