Artemis Photiadou

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So far Artemis Photiadou has created 973 entries.

Merry Christmas from the British Politics and Policy team!

December 25th, 2017|Featured2|0 Comments|
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    Not 2017’s top reads: Assessing the value of academic blogging, beyond ‘hits’

Not 2017’s top reads: Assessing the value of academic blogging, beyond ‘hits’

Should the popularity of an article determine whether academics choose to blog again? In light of increasing interest in the number of times an article has been read, Artemis Photiadou explains why such information gives only part of the picture, and how it may distract from the many benefits academic blogging offers.

There is a December tradition for blogs to […]

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    How are prime ministers held to account? A survey of procedures in 32 parliamentary democracies

How are prime ministers held to account? A survey of procedures in 32 parliamentary democracies

How are prime ministers held to account by their parliaments, and how do UK mechanisms on the matter fare in comparison to those in other countries? Ruxandra Serban explores the different procedures in place across 32 parliamentary democracies to answer these questions.

Prime ministers are prominent political actors in parliamentary democracies, yet there is little understanding of how they are […]

Was Damian Green really the Deputy Prime Minister?

From which post was Damian Green sacked? The newspapers don’t seem to agree. Stephen Thornton and Jonathan Kirkup explain the historical development of the role of Deputy Prime Minister and its complexities, and give their own list of contenders over the years based on a combination of key criteria.

And so farewell, from the cabinet table at least, Damian Green. […]

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    Europe’s ageing societies require immigration to survive – and that means anti-immigration politics is here to stay

Europe’s ageing societies require immigration to survive – and that means anti-immigration politics is here to stay

Opposition to immigration is typically cited as one of the key factors behind Brexit and the growth of new populist parties across Europe. Nate Breznau writes that, with many European countries requiring immigration to compensate for ageing populations, the future is likely to see both a significant increase in immigration and a further rise in the salience of anti-immigration […]

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    Narrowing participation: calculating the likely impact of two-year degrees isn’t simple maths

Narrowing participation: calculating the likely impact of two-year degrees isn’t simple maths

Can university degrees be accelerated? This is the question a recent government consultation seeks to answer. Steven Jones writes that, mathematically, three years of learning could indeed be compressed into two. But he explains why the option would be viewed very differently across social classes, and why it is not a good idea.

For some, the numbers are straightforward. You […]

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    Beware the new justifications for the green belt: what we need is a new approach

Beware the new justifications for the green belt: what we need is a new approach

Alan Mace looks at the justifications in the Draft London Plan for refusing to rethink the green belt. He writes that some of these justifications in the plan reflect a long history of overpromising on what delivers.

Despite the housing crisis in London, the Draft London Plan (DLP) rules out any rethinking of green belt policy, now some eighty years […]

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    Universal Credit: a road paved with good intentions, but where is it leading us?

Universal Credit: a road paved with good intentions, but where is it leading us?

With all the debate and promises around Universal Credit, Abigail Davis writes that it is time to step back and ask ‘what kind of society do we want’? One that helps those in need or punishes them for not having enough? It is these answers that should ultimately guide decisions around what we call ‘benefits’.

It seemed like a good […]