Artemis Photiadou

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So far Artemis Photiadou has created 1048 entries.
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    After Worboys: what next for the parole system in England and Wales?

After Worboys: what next for the parole system in England and Wales?

A fair, transparent, and robust process for the termination of prison sentences is critical to the effective operation of our criminal justice system, writes Thomas Guiney. In light of the Worboys case and the attention drawn to the parole system as a result, he explains what reforms are necessary in order to build a modern parole process that is […]

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    Reason over politics: how The Economist has portrayed austerity since 1945

Reason over politics: how The Economist has portrayed austerity since 1945

The Economist has historically framed austerity as a necessary evil, finds Timo Harjuniemi. He explains why this portrayal is exemplary of how post-political journalism frames economic policy-making more broadly, with one of the consequences being that the debate surrounding the necessity of austerity measures has become less pluralist.

“The unpalatable truth is that austerity lies ahead, whoever wins at the […]

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    Critical actors and abortion law: a group of individuals in Northern Irish politics obstructs change

Critical actors and abortion law: a group of individuals in Northern Irish politics obstructs change

There are various reasons why progress on legal abortion in Northern Ireland has been blocked over the years. Key among them is that individual politicians rule out any suggestion of change, writes Jennifer Thomson. She argues that more attention should be given to the actions of individual actors, considering their role can often be as important as that of […]

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    Why do our feelings about politics matter – and do they matter more now?

Why do our feelings about politics matter – and do they matter more now?

It is too simplistic to argue that current heated debates about politics, especially in the context of Brexit and Trump, are due to the fact that our emotions about politics matter more now than before. Laura Jenkins argues that our feelings about politics have always mattered. In fact, these recent unexpected political outcomes could prove to be an example […]

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    How will Brexit affect the social security rights of EU migrants in the UK, and how the social protection of EU staff?

How will Brexit affect the social security rights of EU migrants in the UK, and how the social protection of EU staff?

Linda Hantrais focuses on two ways in which social security provisions may be affected by Brexit: the social security rights of EU migrants to the UK, where EU institutions have come to play an important coordinating role; and, the social protection rights of British officials working for EU institutions, where benefits and employers’ contributions are paid from the EU […]

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    What was wrong with the Brexit referendum and what would be wrong with a second

What was wrong with the Brexit referendum and what would be wrong with a second

Depending on their design, referendums can be bad for democracy, writes Joseph Lacey. He argues that the central problem with the Brexit referendum was its ad hoc nature. Any second referendum would be of a similar sort and so should be avoided. But there is a way of legitimately deciding upon questions of EU membership: through the mandatory referendum.

A […]

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    Jeremy Hunt’s seven principles on adult social care reform: a new way forward or just rhetoric?

Jeremy Hunt’s seven principles on adult social care reform: a new way forward or just rhetoric?

On 20 March, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Jeremy Hunt finally made a speech identifying the principles that will inform the Green Paper on social care that is to be published later in 2018. Melanie Henwood considers what these principles reveal and reflects on their implications. Are there grounds for optimism, or is this just the […]

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    What can England learn from the German approach to long-term care funding?

What can England learn from the German approach to long-term care funding?

There’s much England could learn from German long-term care funding, argue Caroline Glendinning and Mathew Wills. They explain how, over the past two decades, Germany has rolled out a universal and equitable funding model, supported by both main political parties.

Over the past decade there have been growing calls for reform of social care funding. Following numerous Commissions, Inquiries, and […]