Artemis Photiadou

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So far Artemis Photiadou has created 1119 entries.
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    ‘New poll suggests…’: How to tell when public opinion has really changed

‘New poll suggests…’: How to tell when public opinion has really changed

On a daily basis we are being presented with new opinion polls on various social and political issues, but do these really represent public attitudes? Using a statistical method called bootstrapping to estimate sampling variance, Patrick Sturgis and Jouni Kuha explain how such an approach can improve the quality of debate about UK public opinion.

The volume and frequency of […]

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    Understanding fiscal politics in times of austerity: tax linkages in Britain and France

Understanding fiscal politics in times of austerity: tax linkages in Britain and France

Why do national fiscal pathways diverge in times of austerity? Since the late 1970s, most of the OECD countries have either responded to such episodes by cutting spending and keeping taxes low, or by increasing taxes to match growing public spending. The UK and France are two striking examples of this divergence. Zbigniew Truchlewski explains how tax linkages can […]

Book Review: On Race: 34 Conversations in a Time of Crisis

In On Race: 34 Conversations in a Time of Crisis, George Yancy brings together scholars to reflect on how race and racism have shaped their careers and intellectual work. The collection is a great example of how scholarly dialogue can contribute to pressing public debate, writes Leonardo Custódio, building bridges between personal experiences of racism and philosophical reflections on race and racism’s implications for everyday […]

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    Making a 21st century constitution: the rules we have established for democracies are now outdated

Making a 21st century constitution: the rules we have established for democracies are now outdated

Democratic constitutions are unfit for purpose, with governments facing increased pressures from populists and distrust from citizens. The only way to truly solve these problems is through reform, argues Frank Vibert. He draws on his new book on the topic and sets out the ways in which constitutions should be revitalised.

Democracies are struggling in many parts of the world. […]

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    England’s qualifications gap and its solutions: evidence from the West Midlands

England’s qualifications gap and its solutions: evidence from the West Midlands

There is currently a significant mismatch between the supply and demand for skills at the regional level, write John R. Bryson, Anne Green, Simon Collinson, and Deniz Sevinc. They focus on the qualifications gap in the West Midlands and explain that the solution requires an integrated strategy, addressing housing, skills, and employment issues.

Given that the Brexit negotiations are far […]

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    The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: how nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: how nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

For many Britons, everything was better in the past. Sophia Gaston writes that this is partly because governments have not always been successful at guiding citizens through times of social and economic change. She examines nostalgia as a political force in Britain and explains why politicians must address, rather than avoid questions about patriotism and identity.

The study of nostalgia […]

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    Unionism Vs self-interest: would MPs support Proportional Representation?

Unionism Vs self-interest: would MPs support Proportional Representation?

In light of the electoral divergence between the UK’s constituent nations, and the real danger of a break-up of the Union, Klaus Stolz makes the case for Proportional Representation. He explains, however, that reform will be a choice between the collective self-interest of Labour and Conservative MPs on the one hand, and their ideological values on the other.

Scholars of […]

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    Sport and the push for ‘Empire 2.0’: the 2014 Commonwealth Games in the media

Sport and the push for ‘Empire 2.0’: the 2014 Commonwealth Games in the media

In recent years, the Commonwealth has gained renewed political and diplomatic importance. Stuart Whigham and Jack Black examine how this development has affected the portrayal of sporting events in the British media, using the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games as a case study.

The ties between sport and politics are often evidenced in the ways in which sporting mega-events, such as […]