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    The Privacy Impact Assessment undertaken for care.data isn’t clear on what opting out would mean for our data

The Privacy Impact Assessment undertaken for care.data isn’t clear on what opting out would mean for our data

Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) exist to aid policymakers mitigate identified privacy risks and minimise unintended privacy impacts. So did the care.data PIA miss important issues or were its recommendations mishandled? It would appear both, writes Edgar Whitley. 

A recent edition of the Daily Telegraph led with a story about the details of the care.data proposals.  In making its claims that patient confidentiality could […]

The dynamic consent model provides a way forward for care.data

What do the delays to the care.data plans tell us about privacy and policy making? Edgar A. Whitley considers whether the delays are the result of a poor communication strategy, ill–advised nudges or the consequences of a particular view of respect for persons and individual autonomy. A six month delay in the implementation of the controversial care.data proposals has just been […]

Facebook’s ‘dirty tricks’ campaign against Google will have unexpected consequences in relation to the way that personal data is used and abused

The recent revelation that Facebook employed a PR firm to plant negative news stories about its rival Google has exposed the way that corporate attitudes to personal privacy are changing, argues Edgar Whitley. This ‘dirty tricks’ campaign may have the unexpected consequence of actually refining organisational practices in relation to personal data in ways that are more consumer friendly and […]

How academic research has impact – but not always what the Minister wanted. The story of the LSE Identity Project

The last Labour government policy insisted that henceforward 25 per cent of all government aid to university R & D should be determined by how much ‘impact’ university research has on the economy and public policy. Academics from LSE’s ‘Identity Project’ have been heavily involved in the debates about the now scrapped government identity cards scheme. LSE published a […]

The politics of the Identity documents bill

The Identity Documents Bill is the very first piece of new legislation introduced by the Coalition government. It makes ‘provision for and in connection with the repeal of the Identity Cards Act 2006’ – that is, scraps the ID card. Dr Edgar A. Whitley and Dr Gus Hosein discuss the significance of this legislation for British politics.

Why is the […]

New government to scrap ID cards

In a previous post, we said that ID cards were a key point of difference between the main parties. Both the Liberal Democrats and the Conservatives pledged to scrap them, while Labour would have continued with their plans to introduce them.

The Coalition Agreement between the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats published today states that:

The parties agree to implement […]

Opposition policies on identity cards

ID cards are a key point of difference between the main parties. Both the Liberal Democrats and the Conservatives have pledged to scrap them, while Labour will continue with their plans to introduce them.

The LSE Identity Project has been following developments in the UK’s Identity […]

Identity cards, identity databases, biometric passports and compulsion: Some clarifications

ID cards are a key point of difference between the main parties. Both the Liberal Democrats and the Conservatives have pledged to scrap them, while Labour will continue with their plans to introduce them.

The LSE Identity Project has been following developments in the UK’s Identity Policy since the early days […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.