John van Reenen

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    The aftermath of the Brexit vote – the verdict from a derided expert

The aftermath of the Brexit vote – the verdict from a derided expert

John Van Reenen was disappointed but not surprised by the UK’s vote to Leave the EU. Whilst his own research predicts serious economic and political damage in the case of Brexit, he thought a Leave vote was a real possibility ever since David Cameron committed to a vote in 2013. In his last post as Director of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, he gives […]

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    The question is not whether Brexit will cost the UK in economic terms but how much

The question is not whether Brexit will cost the UK in economic terms but how much

For over two years, a research team at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) has been studying the likely impact of the UK leaving the European Union. Their latest report focuses on the impact of ‘Brexit’ through changing trade patterns. Under ‘optimistic’ assumptions, there is a fall in national income of 1.3 per cent (about £850 per household). Under ‘pessimistic’ assumptions, this doubles […]

Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia

Voting for Jeremy Corbyn as leader is a gut reaction to Labour’s electoral defeat. Corbyn does point to some real economic problems facing Britain but his policies are based largely on the kind of wishful thinking that is endemic in UK politics and both blights Labour’s past. His popularity lies in Labour’s failure to defend its own record in […]

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    Productivity Plan: A sound framework, but gaps in policy persist. More is needed to get productivity growing again

Productivity Plan: A sound framework, but gaps in policy persist. More is needed to get productivity growing again

Following the summer budget, the government released a productivity plan aimed at dealing with a chronic issue facing the UK’s economy. Anna Valero and John Van Reenen review the plan, writing that overall the plan is broadly right, but that some gaps in policy remain.

The Chancellor’s productivity plan “Fixing the foundations: Creating a more prosperous nation” is long overdue. During […]

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    Summer budget 2015: Osborne is right to raise wages, but a clearer productivity plan is required

Summer budget 2015: Osborne is right to raise wages, but a clearer productivity plan is required

Yesterday, George Osborne delivered the new government’s first budget in which he surprised many by hiking the minimum wage significantly. John Van Reenen reviews the measures introduced, writing that the Chancellor is right to want to raise wages, but the best way to do this and maintain employment is through concrete plans to raise productivity. The budget, however, contained too little detail […]

Where is the real Manifesto for Growth?

As voters go to the polls in a knife-edge election, Labour’s popularity on the NHS is counter-balanced by the Tory’s reputation for economic competence. But is this reputation deserved? John Van Reenen writes that a real manifesto for growth requires a coherent long-term plan at the heart of government.

Last week, the ONS revealed that growth of national income halved to 0.3 […]

The NHS: Promises and productivity

In the general election debate about healthcare, all the parties are seeking to portray an NHS protected from major public sector expenditure cuts, with expansion in some areas. But according to Alistair McGuire and John Van Reenen, this is only going to be viable through further efficiency savings of some kind – and even then it is not clear how […]

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    Regarding public service spending, the UK electorate faces real choices this election

Regarding public service spending, the UK electorate faces real choices this election

The possible spending plans of Labour and the Tories illustrate the fact that there are real choices to be made at the election, writes John Van Reenen.

When viewed over the longer term, the state of the UK economy is not pretty. National income per person is today about 16 per cent below where it would be on pre-crisis trends (see Figure 1). […]