Book Reviews

In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish two reviews, originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Book Review: Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia, Participation, Ethics by Jenny Kidd

Book Review: Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia, Participation, Ethics by Jenny Kidd

This is an important contribution to debates around museums today, and a book that consistently asks intelligent and challenging questions of museum critics, practitioners and audiences, writes Richard Martin.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review of Books.

Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia, Participation, Ethics. Jenny Kidd. Ashgate. 2014.

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What do we want from museums today? How do […]

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    Book Review: Sex, Lies and the Ballot Box: 50 things you need to know about British Elections by Philip Cowley and Robert Ford

Book Review: Sex, Lies and the Ballot Box: 50 things you need to know about British Elections by Philip Cowley and Robert Ford

This is a perfect primer on the many contradictory and mysterious hallmarks of UK elections, a read of relevance to all with an interest in how politics works, writes Ben Mueller.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review of Books.

Sex, Lies and the Ballot Box: 50 things you need to know about British Elections. Philip Cowley and Robert Ford. […]

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    Book Review: The Making of Eurosceptic Britain, Second Edition, by Chris Gifford

Book Review: The Making of Eurosceptic Britain, Second Edition, by Chris Gifford

The Making of Eurosceptic Britain is interesting reading for undergraduates interested in the general field of Britain’s relationship with Europe. The fact that its narrative remains coherent in the face of five years of substantial change in British Euroscepticism is a testament to its rigour, writes Harry Evans.

This review originally appeared on the LSE Review of Books.

The Making of Eurosceptic […]

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    Book Review: The Origins and Rise of Dissident Irish Republicanism: The Role and Impact of Organizational Splits by John F. Morrison

Book Review: The Origins and Rise of Dissident Irish Republicanism: The Role and Impact of Organizational Splits by John F. Morrison

 This book is an interesting study of splits within the republican movement since the beginning of The Troubles. Its strongest points are its use of interviews and its description of the recent developments in breakaway groups, while its predictions about the future should be noted, writes Fergus O’ Farrell.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review of Books.

The Origins […]

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    Book Review: Racism, Class and The Racialized Outsider by Satnam Virdee

Book Review: Racism, Class and The Racialized Outsider by Satnam Virdee

Racism, Class and the Racialized Outsider aims to offer an original perspective on the significance of both racism and anti-racism in the making of the English working class. Sarah Burton finds that the key original contribution of this book lies in identifications of the complicity of some working class movements, people, and labour organisations in using the notion of the ‘racialized other’ […]

Book Review: Housing: Where’s the plan? by Kate Barker

Kate Barker emphasises the interconnectedness of the various elements of the housing system, and therefore the difficulty of finding policy interventions that (a) work and (b) don’t have unintended consequences, finds Kath Scanlon.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review of Books.

Housing: Where’s the plan?  Kate Barker. London Publishing Partnership. 2014.

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The crisis in housing supply has risen […]

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    Book Review: Yaya’s Story: The Quest for Well-being in the World by Paul Stoller

Book Review: Yaya’s Story: The Quest for Well-being in the World by Paul Stoller

Combining memoir, ethnography, and philosophy through a series of interconnected narratives, Paul Stoller aims to tell a story of remarkable friendship and the quest for well-being. Whether interested in a study of well-being, of transnational African traders, of spirit possession, of anthropology, or simply of the friendship of two very different men, Yaya’s Story is a book offering much to a wide […]

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    Book Review: Monetary Policy Operations and the Financial System by Ulrich Bindseil

Book Review: Monetary Policy Operations and the Financial System by Ulrich Bindseil

Monetary Policy Operations and the Financial System will not definitively prevent future financial crises, but it will ensure that society better understands what must be done to minimize their effects, writes Henry Piaskowski.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review of Books.

Monetary Policy Operations and the Financial System. Ulrich Bindseil. Oxford University Press. 2014.

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The recent financial crisis […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.