Book Reviews

In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish a review originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Book Review: The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy by Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz

Book Review: The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy by Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz

How has the digital era changed notions of ownership? In The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy, Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz explore how digital products are typically licensed rather than owned and defend the continued importance of personal property in the digital economy. While Christopher May is somewhat frustrated by the exclusive focus on US law and […]

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    Book review: Transparency and the Open Society: Practical Lessons for Effective Policy

Book review: Transparency and the Open Society: Practical Lessons for Effective Policy

In Transparency and the Open Society: Practical Lessons for Effective Policy, Roger Taylor and Tim Kelsey offers a systematic framework for establishing greater transparency across government and civil society more broadly. While the book does raise a number of further questions about the capacity to engender a more transparent society, Andrew Reid recommends this informative book to those looking to […]

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    Book Review: Electronic Dreams. How 1980s Britain Learned to Love the Computer by Tom Lean

Book Review: Electronic Dreams. How 1980s Britain Learned to Love the Computer by Tom Lean

In Electronic Dreams: How 1980s Britain Learned to Love the Computer, Tom Lean offers a new study of the history of personal computing by deftly tracing links between users, emerging technologies, makers and the wider context of government thinking and media in eighties Britain. With the book largely avoiding nostalgia, Peter Webster recommends this as essential reading for all those interested […]

Book Review: Neoliberalism and the Moral Economy of Fraud

In Neoliberalism and the Moral Economy of Fraud, David Whyte and Jörg Wiegratz offer an edited collection exploring how neoliberalism has enabled the proliferation of systemic fraud across different geographical and social settings. This book plays a vital role in increasing understanding of unethical behaviour, helping us to address the beliefs and rituals that otherwise perpetuate fraudulent culture, finds Atul K. […]

Book Review: What is Populism? by Jan-Werner Müller

In What is Populism?, Jan-Werner Müller provides a timely perspective on the pressing question of what populism is and how to respond to it. Defining populism as anti-pluralist, elite-critical politics with a moral claim to representation, he cautions that populists are both willing and able to govern and may therefore deform democracy by turning states towards partisanship. This short book […]

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    Book Review: Culture, Economy and Politics: The Case of New Labour by David Hesmondhalgh, Kate Oakley, David Lee and Melissa Nisbett

Book Review: Culture, Economy and Politics: The Case of New Labour by David Hesmondhalgh, Kate Oakley, David Lee and Melissa Nisbett

In Culture, Economy and Politics: The Case of New Labour, David Hesmondhalgh, Kate Oakley, David Lee and Melissa Nisbett focus on the emergence of cultural policy as a key concern under the Labour party between 1997 and 2010. Drawing particularly upon interviews with key figures, this is a valuable, even-handed book that is recommended reading for any course exploring […]

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    Book Review: Diaries: Volume 5: Outside, Inside, 2003-2005 by Alastair Campbell

Book Review: Diaries: Volume 5: Outside, Inside, 2003-2005 by Alastair Campbell

In the fifth volume of his published diaries, Outside, Inside, 2003-2005, Alastair Campbell steps down as Tony Blair’s Director of Communications in 2003 but is drawn back into politics amidst the continued chaos of the Iraq War, the breakdown of the Blair-Brown relationship and the impending election campaign. With the pace of a thriller, this book offers fascinating insights into Campbell’s struggle […]

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    Book Review: A Fiery and a Furious People: A History of Violence in England by James Sharpe

Book Review: A Fiery and a Furious People: A History of Violence in England by James Sharpe

In A Fiery and Furious People: A History of Violence in England, James Sharpe draws on a wide range of primary source materials to give the reader a vivid insight into England’s criminals and criminal system from the medieval period to the present day. As Sharpe outlines how society’s attitudes towards different forms of violence have changed throughout the […]

November 27th, 2016|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.