Book Reviews

In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish a review originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Book Review: Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership

Book Review: Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership

In new edited collection Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership, Sarah Fine and Lea Ypi bring together essays from well-known political and legal theorists examining pressing questions including the legitimacy of border controls and the human right to freedom of movement. This book constitutes an excellent introduction to the ethics of migration and offers some novel contributions […]

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    How the Occupy movement may have facilitated political change

How the Occupy movement may have facilitated political change

Occupy protests are one of the major global political waves of our time. But what was their impact?  Alper Yagci highlights the link between the recession, inequality, and the Occupy movement, and writes that although the institutional impact might not have been immediately obvious, the wider political change Occupy facilitated is now becoming clearer.

The movement emerged late in 2011, […]

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    Book Review: Precarious Lives: Forced Labour, Exploitation and Asylum by Hannah Lewis, Peter Dwyer, Stuart Hodkinson and Louise Waite

Book Review: Precarious Lives: Forced Labour, Exploitation and Asylum by Hannah Lewis, Peter Dwyer, Stuart Hodkinson and Louise Waite

Precarious Lives: Forced Labour, Exploitation and Asylum offers a groundbreaking examination of the forced labour experienced by migrants and asylum seekers seeking refuge in the United Kingdom. Hannah Lewis, Peter Dwyer, Stuart Hodkinson and Louise Waiteexplore the ‘hyper-precarity trap’ that binds their interviewees to exploitative, insecure and often hidden working conditions. Tribeni Gurung argues that this fascinating and comprehensible read not […]

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    The plight of the Chagos Islanders shows the dark side of the US-UK special relationship

The plight of the Chagos Islanders shows the dark side of the US-UK special relationship

While the strength of the US-UK ‘special relationship’ has waxed and waned in recent years, many have viewed it as being generally beneficial. Peter Harris writes on one major casualty of the special relationship – the Chagos Islanders. Evicted from their home nearly 50 years ago, the Chagos Islands were converted into the US military base, Diego Garcia. Despite […]

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    Book Review: This is London: Life and Death in the World City by Ben Judah

Book Review: This is London: Life and Death in the World City by Ben Judah

In This is London: Life and Death in the World City, journalist Ben Judah returns to the city in which he was born, immersing himself in intermittently surreal and harrowing encounters in order to discover the various faces of contemporary London. While Judah’s decision to focus on the extremes at times neglects the richness enfolded in the stories of […]

Book Review: Why We Can’t Afford the Rich by Andrew Sayer

Against the backdrop of rising economic inequality, Why We Can’t Afford the Rich tackles the myth that the rich are vital wealth creators. Instead, Andrew Sayer outlines the negative societal and environmental impact of unsustainable growth and extreme concentrations of wealth.  Winner of the 2015 British Academy Peter Townsend Prize, this is a readable and persuasive book, even if some of its […]

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    Book Review: The Presidentialization of Political Parties: Organizations, Institutions and Leaders edited by Gianluca Passarelli

Book Review: The Presidentialization of Political Parties: Organizations, Institutions and Leaders edited by Gianluca Passarelli

Edited by Gianluca Passarelli, new collection The Presidentialization of Political Parties: Organizations, Institutions and Leaders, explores why the level of party presidentialisation varies between countries, arguing that this is linked to both constitutional design and the genetic features of political parties. Although he finds that some of the country case studies provide stronger evidence for the book’s central argument […]

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    Book Review: In Search of the Perfect Health System by Mark Britnell

Book Review: In Search of the Perfect Health System by Mark Britnell

Mark Britnell is one of the UK’s most knowledgeable health management professionals, with boundless enthusiasm for healthcare and a mission to encourage countries to collaborate for the benefit of patients and citizens in general. In Search of the Perfect Health System is a series of essays based on his observation of health systems around the world, from which he […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.