In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish two reviews, originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Book Review: The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld by Jamie Bartlett

Book Review: The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld by Jamie Bartlett

The Dark Net aims to examine the most innovative and dangerous online subcultures: trolls and pornographers, drug dealers and hackers, political extremists and computer scientists, Bitcoin programmers and self-harmers, libertarians and vigilantes. Ian Hargreaves finds that some of Jamie Bartlett’s arguments seem out of tune with the times, though the book remains an illuminating read.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review […]

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    Book Review: Gender Inequality in the Labour Market in the UK edited by Giovanni Razzu

Book Review: Gender Inequality in the Labour Market in the UK edited by Giovanni Razzu

Despite the changed and changing position of women in society there remain substantial gender differences in the labour market. This collection covers the gender pay gap, occupational segregation, and gender differences in school subject choice. Marion Koob is impressed but would like to have seen more policy recommendations from the book’s contributors.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review […]

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    Book Review: An Introduction to the English School of International Relations by Barry Buzan

Book Review: An Introduction to the English School of International Relations by Barry Buzan

Written by leading ES scholar Barry Buzan, this book aims to guide readers through the English School’s formative ideas, intellectual and historical roots, current controversies and future avenues of development. Adrian Gallagher finds that this is an outstanding contemporary overview of the English School, a must read for all those interested in using, or critiquing, the ES approach. It sits at […]

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    Book Review: The Rule of Law: The Common Sense of Global Politics by Christopher May

Book Review: The Rule of Law: The Common Sense of Global Politics by Christopher May

Christopher May’s latest book explores the complexities of the rule of law – a well-used but perhaps less well understood term – to explain why it is so often appealed to in discussions of global politics. Ignas Kalpokas finds that this is a timely and insightful disruption of the monotony of the rule of law discourse for the way it calls into […]

September 28th, 2014|Book Reviews|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Right and the Welfare State by Carsten Jensen

Book Review: The Right and the Welfare State by Carsten Jensen

The Right and the Welfare State studies the welfare state policies of conservative and liberal governments. These parties have been assumed to be nothing but the welfare-sceptical flip-side of the Left, but Carsten Jensen uses case studies of Australia, Denmark, and the UK to present a new theory. Patricia Hogwood finds that Jensen’s approach proves most effective in highlighting a […]

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    Book Review: Advancing Electoral Integrity edited by Pippa Norris, Richard W Frank and Ferran Martínez i Coma

Book Review: Advancing Electoral Integrity edited by Pippa Norris, Richard W Frank and Ferran Martínez i Coma

Are elections free and fair? How can we measure whether they are? And what is the popular reaction to different types of electoral regime? Ron Johnston reviews a recent edited volume exploring electoral integrity, an outcome of a major international project focusing on these relatively under-studied questions.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review of Books.

Advancing Electoral Integrity. […]

Book Review: How to Speak Money by John Lanchester

John Lanchester, the bestselling author of Capital and Whoops!, aims to decode the global language of money for all of us in an amusing and jargon-free read. Diane Coyle finds this is a very entertaining read and a clear guide to the kind of economics spoken in the financial markets and the media. Those who already speak the language would do well to read […]

Book Review: Future-Minded: The Psychology of Agency and Control by Magda Osman

Focusing on processes including decision-making and memory, Future-Minded provides fascinating insight into phenomena such as coincidences and the illusion of control to consider how agency and control help us to think about the future. Neil Bramley writes that the book is a great choice for anyone interested in better understanding how the mind works.

This review was originally published on […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.