Book Reviews

In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish a review originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Book Review: Diaries: Volume 5: Outside, Inside, 2003-2005 by Alastair Campbell

Book Review: Diaries: Volume 5: Outside, Inside, 2003-2005 by Alastair Campbell

In the fifth volume of his published diaries, Outside, Inside, 2003-2005, Alastair Campbell steps down as Tony Blair’s Director of Communications in 2003 but is drawn back into politics amidst the continued chaos of the Iraq War, the breakdown of the Blair-Brown relationship and the impending election campaign. With the pace of a thriller, this book offers fascinating insights into Campbell’s struggle […]

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    Book Review: A Fiery and a Furious People: A History of Violence in England by James Sharpe

Book Review: A Fiery and a Furious People: A History of Violence in England by James Sharpe

In A Fiery and Furious People: A History of Violence in England, James Sharpe draws on a wide range of primary source materials to give the reader a vivid insight into England’s criminals and criminal system from the medieval period to the present day. As Sharpe outlines how society’s attitudes towards different forms of violence have changed throughout the […]

November 27th, 2016|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens by Gabriel Zucman

Book Review: The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens by Gabriel Zucman

In The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens, Gabriel Zucman makes a provocative argument about the large-scale evasion of taxes as well as how to tackle this global issue. Antonio De Vito highly recommends this concise, nontechnical and clearly argued book to everyone interested in understanding how the international financial system is making illegal use of tax […]

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    Book Review: The Coalition Effect, 2010-2015 edited by Anthony Seldon & Mike Finn

Book Review: The Coalition Effect, 2010-2015 edited by Anthony Seldon & Mike Finn

In The Coalition Effect, 2010-2015, Anthony Seldon and Mike Finn offer a volume of essays examining the impact of the Coalition government of 2010-2015 on British politics. While the hindsight enabled by the 2015 General Election result and the recent Brexit vote means that the precise legacies of the Coalition are still unfolding, this is an indispensable text that provides intriguing, […]

Book Review: Metric Power by David Beer

In Metric Power, David Beer examines the intensifying role that metrics play in our everyday lives, from healthcare provision to our interactions with friends and family, within the context of the so-termed data revolution. This is a book that illustrates our growing implication in, and arguable acquiescence to, an increasingly quantified world, but, Thomas Christie Williams asks, where do we […]

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    Book Review: The Right to Buy? Selling Off Public and Social Housing by Alan Murie

Book Review: The Right to Buy? Selling Off Public and Social Housing by Alan Murie

Introduced under the Thatcher government, ‘Right to Buy’ has had a formative effect on housing in the UK for the past 35 years. In The Right to Buy? Selling Off Public and Social Housing, Alan Murie examines the policy’s long-standing and ongoing impact, and considers the implications of its more recent extension. While more explicit political analysis of the […]

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    Book Review: Preventive Detention of Terror Suspects: A New Legal Framework by Diane Webber

Book Review: Preventive Detention of Terror Suspects: A New Legal Framework by Diane Webber

In Preventive Detention of Terror Suspects: A New Legal Framework, Diane Webber offers a comprehensive analysis of preventive detention as a much-criticised counter-terrorism tool, examining the legal frameworks relating to the detention of terror suspects across multiple jurisidictions, including the UK, the US, Australia, Canada, India, Israel and France. Alexis Bushnell welcomes this as a timely and valuable reference point […]

Ctrl + Z: The Right to be Forgotten by Meg Leta Jones

As more and more data is collected, shared and circulated online, should there be a right for this to be deleted, hidden or anonymised at one’s request? In Ctrl + Z: The Right to be Forgotten, Meg Leta Jones analyses this emerging debate and proposes new ways of thinking about the right to privacy in an increasingly digital world. […]

October 16th, 2016|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.