In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish two reviews, originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

  • RBnov23feat (2)
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Reshaping the University: the Rise of the Regulated Market in Higher Education by David Palfreyman and Ted Tapper

Book Review: Reshaping the University: the Rise of the Regulated Market in Higher Education by David Palfreyman and Ted Tapper

This book focuses on the policy of removing almost entirely public support for the payment of student fees. Although it goes into great detail regarding the emergence of the regulated market as a way of delivering higher education to growing numbers, it does so with little apparent appreciation for what that emergence has required within the universities and in the […]

  • RBnov23feature
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Violence and Understanding in Gaza: The British Broadsheets’ Coverage of the War by Dávid Kaposi

Book Review: Violence and Understanding in Gaza: The British Broadsheets’ Coverage of the War by Dávid Kaposi

Instead of asking who is innocent and who should be blamed, the media should start to treat the Israel-Palestine conflict as a story of mutually painful but very real human relations, argues Dávid Kaposi in his new book. Catherine Hezser hopes that journalists will take up Kaposi’s suggestions and initiate a more complex, balanced, and historically-informed discourse on Israel and Hamas/Palestinians.

This review was […]

  • RBnov16feat
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Journalism: A Very Short Introduction by Ian Hargreaves

Book Review: Journalism: A Very Short Introduction by Ian Hargreaves

In a world where many consumers are unhappy to pay for news and entertainment content, what is the future of journalism? In this Very Short Introduction, Ian Hargreaves looks not only at what journalism has been in the past, but also at what it is becoming in the digital age, and examines the big issues relating to reportage, warfare, celebrity culture, privacy, […]

  • RBnov9feat
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Devolution and Localism in England by David M. Smith and Enid Wistrich

Book Review: Devolution and Localism in England by David M. Smith and Enid Wistrich

Tracing the development of decentralisation policies through regional policies up to and including the 2010 General Election and the radical shift away from regionalism to localism by the new Coalition Government thereafter, the authors consider some of the key policies of the incumbent Coalition Government such as City Regions and Localism. This book is a much-needed contribution to the debate […]

Book Review: After the Crisis by Alain Touraine

After the Crisis is a book which sheds light on the conditions which led to the crisis and on the broader crisis of the late capitalist society. It is a reading addressed to both experts and general audience who want to understand our society and to imagine a future, post-social, society born after the crisis, writes Francesco Di Bernardo.

After the Crisis. Alain […]

  • Oct 25 book review feature
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: A Feminist Voyage through International Relations by J. Ann Tickner

Book Review: A Feminist Voyage through International Relations by J. Ann Tickner

A Feminist Voyage through International Relations is a collection of essays by renowned feminist IR scholar, J. Ann Tickner. Over the course of a 25 year career, Tickner has pioneered a distinctly feminist, and influential, methodological approach to IR. She demonstrates how, now more than ever, analysing IR through a feminist lens is essential for a greater understanding of […]

  • Dark net
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld by Jamie Bartlett

Book Review: The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld by Jamie Bartlett

The Dark Net aims to examine the most innovative and dangerous online subcultures: trolls and pornographers, drug dealers and hackers, political extremists and computer scientists, Bitcoin programmers and self-harmers, libertarians and vigilantes. Ian Hargreaves finds that some of Jamie Bartlett’s arguments seem out of tune with the times, though the book remains an illuminating read.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review […]

  • PicMonkey-Collage-work-place
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Gender Inequality in the Labour Market in the UK edited by Giovanni Razzu

Book Review: Gender Inequality in the Labour Market in the UK edited by Giovanni Razzu

Despite the changed and changing position of women in society there remain substantial gender differences in the labour market. This collection covers the gender pay gap, occupational segregation, and gender differences in school subject choice. Marion Koob is impressed but would like to have seen more policy recommendations from the book’s contributors.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review […]

Bad Behavior has blocked 99038 access attempts in the last 7 days.

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.