British and Irish Politics and Policy

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    Britain’s ‘Christian right’: seeking solace in a narrative of discrimination

Britain’s ‘Christian right’: seeking solace in a narrative of discrimination

The ‘Christian right’ in the UK may not be anywhere near as powerful as its US counterpart, but it still tries to exert influence on public policy. This has become increasingly difficult as fewer Britons identify themselves as Christian. Steven Kettell finds that although these campaigners bemoan the effects of secularisation, they have found themselves adopting secular arguments in order to oppose same-sex marriage, […]

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    Manchester’s transformation over the past 25 years: why we need a reset of city region policy

Manchester’s transformation over the past 25 years: why we need a reset of city region policy

Since the abolition of Manchester’s city region government by Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s, councillors and officers have been sponsoring the transformation of the city by private property developers. Peter Folkman, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, John Tomaney and Karel Williams explain the unrecognised and unintended consequences of this transformation.

Manchester has been at the centre of claims about an urban […]

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    Creating an ideal citizenry: the perorations of twentieth-century Budget speeches

Creating an ideal citizenry: the perorations of twentieth-century Budget speeches

Together with setting out fiscal policy, Budget speeches provide an opportunity for the government to sell their broader political philosophy, writes Noel Thompson. He examines the language used in such speeches throughout the previous century and explains how the collective concepts of ‘country’, ‘nation’ and ‘people’ have been employed by chancellors to engage with the emotions of their audiences.

The […]

After Brexit: the English question surfaces?

In fulfilling the demands of Brexit voters, the government faces great obstacles, both from within and outside the UK. One of those is the kind of polity that would allow the May government to pursue its version of Brexit: the kind that requires a re-assertion of the powers of the unitary state which are in profound tension since devolution. […]

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    Not left behind? Five questions that need answering before the Copeland and Stoke by-elections

Not left behind? Five questions that need answering before the Copeland and Stoke by-elections

There will be two by-elections this month, yet the focus is more on who will win than on what policies they will adopt if they do win. Peter Kenway, Dan Corry, and Steve Barwick outline the main problems facing Stoke and Copeland, and set some key questions that will make for a more substantive debate.

On 23 February, the country […]

What is the point of petitions in British politics?

Just under 2 million people signed a petition opposing Donald Trump’s state visit to the UK – half the number of those who signed one asking for a second EU referendum. With the role of petitions taking centre stage as a result, Cristina Leston-Bandeira situates the process within a broader policy-making context. She explains that petitions are an effective […]

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    Answering the age-old question: what does democracy mean to those who protest for it?

Answering the age-old question: what does democracy mean to those who protest for it?

There has long been a debate about democracy as a form of governance and whether it is in decline – Brexit and Trump have only exacerbated it. Drawing on research in four capital cities, Armine Ishkanian explains how activists view democracy. She explains why these committed and engaged citizens reject representative democracy, and the internal struggles of organisation within […]

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    Multiculturalism is unpopular with the majority – even though it makes for happier societies

Multiculturalism is unpopular with the majority – even though it makes for happier societies

How do people feel about multicultural policies? Ethnic majorities tend to resent them, and feel less safe in societies with a number of affirmative and rights-based policies, write Pamela Irving Jackson and Peter Doerschler. As a result, governments have come under pressure to ensure policies that tackle inequality benefit everyone. Yet both ethnic majorities and minorities declare themselves happier with their […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.