British and Irish Politics and Policy

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    Brexit means Brexit – but the Norway model is clearly the least worst option

Brexit means Brexit – but the Norway model is clearly the least worst option

There has been no formal statement by Theresa May’s government on when Article 50, which initiates the process for the UK leaving the EU, will be triggered. Gavin Barrett argues that although delaying the process will prolong market uncertainty, the new Prime Minister may be wise to hold off until early 2017 as once Article 50 is invoked much […]

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    Brexit, Whitehall, and the demise of Haldane: the need for a new minister-civil servant relationship?

Brexit, Whitehall, and the demise of Haldane: the need for a new minister-civil servant relationship?

Brexit poses significant challenges to Whitehall, and raises questions about whether the Civil Service is up to the task of negotiating a new settlement for Britain’s place in the world, write Dave Richards and Martin Smith. Outlining the development of Whitehall reforms, they explain why a very different ministerial-civil service relationship is needed, as well as an overhaul of […]

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    Why Brexit negotiations must focus on politics rather than personalities

Why Brexit negotiations must focus on politics rather than personalities

Theresa May has visited a number of European leaders since taking office as UK Prime Minister. Richard Rose writes that while these early diplomatic forays are undoubtedly useful, it is likely that several of the heads of government she has met will no longer be in power when the UK’s Brexit negotiations reach a climax.

In less than a month […]

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    Would Justin Trudeau’s ‘sunny ways’ work in the UK? Lessons we can (and can’t) draw from Canada

Would Justin Trudeau’s ‘sunny ways’ work in the UK? Lessons we can (and can’t) draw from Canada

British politicians have a long history of looking across the Atlantic for policy and campaign ideas. Since Justin Trudeau’s landslide election victory in October 2015, however, Canada has begun to displace the US as the focus of progressive admiration. Yet direct comparisons may not be very insightful, explains Peter Sloman.

Labour politicians wonder how the 43-year-old Trudeau managed to deflect […]

What does ‘Brexit means Brexit’ actually mean?

Theresa May has famously stated that ‘Brexit means Brexit’, but what does this actually mean (if anything)? Sionaidh Douglas-Scott examines the legal implications of triggering Article 50. The position of referendums in UK constitutional law is very hazy, and previous UK-EU negotiations on crucial matters have often been shrouded in secrecy. Paradoxically, Brexit may therefore not mean ‘taking back […]

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    The democracy bomb: Brexit and the need for a written constitution

The democracy bomb: Brexit and the need for a written constitution

Brexit may have aborted the careers of David Cameron, George Osborne, and all the main Brexit leaders. But rest assured, the reality is worse writes Jean-Paul Faguet. The referendum was a toxic measure that leaves the new government in an impossible situation, damned whatever it does. And although the UK’s uncodified constitution provides guidance on many issues, we nonetheless […]

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    ‘Post-truth’ politics: a debasement of standards in public life

‘Post-truth’ politics: a debasement of standards in public life

Verbal dexterity, inconsistency and ‘spin’ are part and parcel of normal politics but the exaggerations and distortions of the EU referendum campaign has led to concerns about ‘post-truth’ politics. Nicholas Allen and Sarah Birch write there is a need for someone to provide a moral lead, and argue the Committee for Standards in Public Life could play a valuable […]

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    Denial, anger, and acceptance: moving to the next phase of the British far-right

Denial, anger, and acceptance: moving to the next phase of the British far-right

In spite of evidence of long-running and large latent support, we have been in a state of denial about the far-right in Britain, which has fed into the growth of UKIP, writes Helen Margetts. Here, she outlines the state of the far-right and argues that we need to move towards acceptance, be alert to signals in long-running trends, and […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.