British and Irish Politics and Policy

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    How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

Considering the turnaround in fortunes during and after the 2017 general election, why didn’t Labour win? The answer is to be found both in the Labour party’s governance, and in the whole system of British government, explains Ed Straw.

Given the dire display of their government opponents, some have asked the legitimate question: why did Labour not win? Let’s start […]

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    Tim Farron’s resignation and the hidden limits of liberalism

Tim Farron’s resignation and the hidden limits of liberalism

Tim Farron explained that his resignation was due to his conservative Christian beliefs having hampered the liberal views of his party. Paula Zoido Oses analyses this argument and explains how liberalism can work in public life.

Tim Farron,recently stepped down as the leader of the Liberal Democrats due to a conflict between his Christian Faith and the liberal values defended […]

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    How the government has prioritised administrative convenience over child support

How the government has prioritised administrative convenience over child support

The Child Maintenance Service exists to calculate and ensure payment for those who struggle to receive child support. But despite extensive reforms, the service still allows many parents to pay a fraction of what they can afford, writes Sumi Rabindrakumar. Rather than tackle the system’s long-standing loopholes, policymakers have preferred a system that is cheap and simple to deliver […]

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    Scottish leaders’ debates on Twitter: Sturgeon, Davidson, and ‘indyref2’ dominated proceedings

Scottish leaders’ debates on Twitter: Sturgeon, Davidson, and ‘indyref2’ dominated proceedings

As the dust begins to settle on the 2017 General Election campaign, Graeme Baxter, Simon Burnett, John Isaacs, Iain MacLeod, Sarah Pedersen, and Elizabeth Tait reflect upon the Twitter response to the two televised Scottish leaders’ debates held in the lead-up to polling day.

Continuing a longitudinal study that has previously investigated Twitter response to televised debates during the 2014 […]

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    Homes fit for 21st century heroes: the past and future of UK housing policy

Homes fit for 21st century heroes: the past and future of UK housing policy

For over a century, housing has shaped British political economy and has both consolidated and divided the two major parties, writes Ewan Gibbs. He outlines the centrality of housing policies in British history, and argues that strategic adjustments will be key in adapting future policy to popular morality and structural economic forces.

From Lloyd George’s infamous call for a government […]

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    Value for money over value for people: how material politics can perpetuate inequality

Value for money over value for people: how material politics can perpetuate inequality

Social inequality in housing is a pressing issue that takes on a material dimension. To start tackling it, we need to rethink how we talk about housing and design, writes Mona Sloane. She explains how under current processes, attempts to improve the building stock often end up perpetuating wider social inequality.

The tragedy of Grenfell Tower continues to expose the […]

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    How can we ethically respond to rough sleeping? A four-point framework

How can we ethically respond to rough sleeping? A four-point framework

How can society best respond to escalating levels of rough sleeping? Should it seek to change the behaviour of homeless people, or provide tolerant and unconditional support? Beth Watts offers four criteria to help navigate through this extremely polarised debate.

Levels of rough sleeping have escalated rapidly in recently years, with reports of deaths on the street now increasingly common. […]

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    EVEL won’t worry the new government – but the West Lothian question may well do

EVEL won’t worry the new government – but the West Lothian question may well do

Following the election result some pundits have suggested that English votes for English laws might be an obstacle to the government, given its reliance on support from non-English MPs, whilst others have suggested the procedures might provide the government with an enhanced English majority. In this post Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny explain that neither of these possibilities is […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.