Brexit

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    Deal > Remain > No-deal > Deal: Brexit and the Condorcet paradox

Deal > Remain > No-deal > Deal: Brexit and the Condorcet paradox

With the possibility of a second referendum gaining increasing support, what happens if more than two options are on such a ballot paper for voters to rank? Simon Kaye explains the prospect of a Condorcet cycle and considers alternatives. He concludes that, whatever the route taken, there will always be a majority who will find the outcome of the […]

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    Restrictive immigration policies are in the pipeline – but the UK has already lost its charm

Restrictive immigration policies are in the pipeline – but the UK has already lost its charm

The prospect of Brexit has already made the UK a less attractive option for new EU migrants, according to the latest statistics. What is set to make the country an even less attractive destination is the government’s new immigration policy, writes Heather Rolfe.

As Theresa May faces a show-down in Parliament and tours the UK in a ‘charm offensive’, she […]

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    Labour must abandon the soft Brexit position and come out for Remain and reform

Labour must abandon the soft Brexit position and come out for Remain and reform

Mary Kaldor explains why Labour should abandon its ambiguous ‘sensible deal’ position in favour remain and reform thhe EU; she argues that such a stance is Labour’s opportunity to trigger a far-reaching deliberative exercise in both Britain and Europe.

 According to Theresa May, the choice is between her deal, no deal or no Brexit. But the Labour leadership still seems […]

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    There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

The contribution of traditional social democracy to the consolidation of neoliberalism in Europe illustrates the difficulties of developing a nationalist left alternative in the contemporary capitalist state, argues Lea Ypi. Contemporary socialism requires new ways of organising and must be transnational. Using the British case, she explains why neither Remain nor Leave fully capture the demands of the left.

The […]

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    All things to all people: the UK–EU relationship in David Cameron’s speeches

All things to all people: the UK–EU relationship in David Cameron’s speeches

David Cameron was the Prime Minister who promised and delivered a referendum on EU membership, shortly after which he left politics. How did he present the UK–EU relationship during his premiership? Monika Brusenbauch Meislová finds that he adopted a combination of antithetical sub-discourses, which he naturally failed to integrate into a coherent and sustainable discourse.

Under the premiership of the […]

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    Young Cosmopolitans: values, identity, and the youth vote in the EU referendum

Young Cosmopolitans: values, identity, and the youth vote in the EU referendum

The Brexit referendum exposed strong intergenerational divisions. With Britain’s young people having overwhelmingly voted in favour of remaining in the European Union, Rakib Ehsan explores the driving factors behind this support.

The June 2016 referendum on EU membership rocked the political establishment. The decision to leave the EU represented a rejection of what the vast majority of the political […]

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    Let’s lose control: public procurement policy before, during, and after EU membership

Let’s lose control: public procurement policy before, during, and after EU membership

David Clayton and David Higgins assess UK public procurement policy since the early 1970s. They explain why the EU’s common legal regime has had a positive impact on the UK economy, and therefore why leaving it will have negative implications.

Public procurement was raised during the 2016 Referendum campaign as part of a Leave critique of ‘red-tape’, and to claim […]

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    Schrodinger’s devolution and the potential for ongoing political instability after Brexit

Schrodinger’s devolution and the potential for ongoing political instability after Brexit

Territorial governance in the UK has taken the form of ‘Schrodinger’s devolution’, where the devolved nations both have and have not experienced fundamental constitutional change. But Brexit highlights the need for exact decisions where ambiguity has so far existed, explain Mark Sandford and Cathy Gormley-Heenan.

One of the less anticipated features of Brexit has been the lengthy and almost intractable […]