Brexit

How bad will Brexit really be for the UK?

Long-term forecasts claiming that leaving the EU with no deal on trade would be economically disastrous undermine the UK’s optimal negotiating strategy, writes Graham Gudgin. He points out significant flaws in such forecasts and shows why the estimates they table cannot be accepted as accurate.

The great majority of the economic forecasts have concluded that Brexit will damage the UK economy. […]

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    Is UK economy really as strong as the government says it is?

Is UK economy really as strong as the government says it is?

The British economic model needs fundamental reform, without which the UK will remain in a particularly weak position – one that is only exacerbated by the challenges of Brexit. Grace Blakeley draws on IPPR’s latest report to explain why, despite the headline figures on employment and growth, the reality is different.

As the UK negotiates to leave the European Union, […]

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    Until government releases its Brexit analyses, the data available suggests we are better off in the EU

Until government releases its Brexit analyses, the data available suggests we are better off in the EU

The government has refused to publish its sector-by-sector analyses of the impact of Brexit, arguing that releasing them they would undermine its negotiating position. Molly Scott Cato says businesspeople trying to plan for the future have a right to know what the likely effects of leaving the EU will be.

It was, I thought, a fairly reasonable request, for an MEP […]

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    Warning: the cost of Brexit could seriously damage your health service

Warning: the cost of Brexit could seriously damage your health service

Leaving the EU would free up more money for the NHS, according to Leave campaigners. This pledge has been all but disowned – and in any case, writes Joan Costa-Font, Brexit will impose further costs on an already cash-strapped service. The biggest effect will be on wage bills, but it will also restrict choice for Britons and raise procurement costs.

Healthcare and the National […]

Is EU talent being chased away from the UK by Brexit?

Several UK employers and business representatives have expressed concern that Brexit could damage the UK’s ability to attract skilled workers from the EU. Matthias Busse and Mikkel Barslund use LinkedIn data to examine whether these concerns are justified. They find support for the view that Brexit has reduced the attractiveness of the UK for recent high-skilled graduates from the […]

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    How the EFTA Court works – and why it is an option for post-Brexit Britain

How the EFTA Court works – and why it is an option for post-Brexit Britain

The UK government has said it wants the country to leave the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. Carl Baudenbacher argues that Britain could use his court to resolve disputes. He explains the mutually enlightening relationship between the two courts and rejects the claim that the EFTA Court is easily outgunned by the ECJ.

The EFTA Court is an […]

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    To be less dependent on immigration, Britain must change its model of capitalism

To be less dependent on immigration, Britain must change its model of capitalism

The British economy is structurally dependent on migrant workers because it is lightly regulated and depends heavily on domestic demand, write Alexandre Afonso and Camilla Devitt. They explain why less immigration will require a greater role for the state.

The desire to lower immigration has been one of the main drivers behind the Brexit vote. Now, Theresa May’s cabinet […]

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    Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

The government’s recent paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

The most welcome aspect of the government’s policy paper on future customs arrangements is its acknowledgement of the desirability of a transition […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.