Brexit

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    EU citizens in the UK are in a particularly weak position and need an independent authority to monitor their rights

EU citizens in the UK are in a particularly weak position and need an independent authority to monitor their rights

The Brexit Withdrawal Agreement (WA) has been unveiled, but the protection of EU citizens’ rights after Brexit is still a hotly debated topic. As things stand now, EU citizens living in Britain may risk falling into an implementation gap created by the limitations to bottom-up enforcement and the limits of international dispute settlement. Stijn Smismans argues that EU citizens in the […]

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    UK influence after Brexit: the Commonwealth should be seen as a network, not as an excuse

UK influence after Brexit: the Commonwealth should be seen as a network, not as an excuse

Portraying the Commonwealth as a group of trading partners who share similar values and that will bolster the UK’s influence and prosperity after Brexit is at best delusional, writes Fred Carver. He argues that while the Commonwealth can be used as a diplomatic network in certain cases, it should not be used as a catch-all excuse for trade […]

April 14th, 2018|Brexit, Featured|6 Comments|
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    Understanding the UK’s soft power: more than Shakespeare and the Royal Family

Understanding the UK’s soft power: more than Shakespeare and the Royal Family

Do we understand enough about what soft power is? Gary Rawnsley explains that although the focus has so far been on cultural icons and stories, there is another important aspect to soft power: the actions of the British government. These are seen as a reflection of the values the UK upholds, and so influence opinions overseas. He argues that […]

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    Public attitudes to Brexit: the referendum was more a vote for re-regulation than for de-regulation

Public attitudes to Brexit: the referendum was more a vote for re-regulation than for de-regulation

Drawing on new polling of attitudes to Brexit, Marley Morris explores the public’s preference for different trade scenarios when faced with a number of difficult trade-offs. He concludes that, if the government wants public support for its negotiating position, it must negotiate a deal that keeps the European model close – and rejects the deregulation agenda.

The strange irony of […]

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    Fraud unravels everything: Brexit is voidable and Article 50 can be revoked

Fraud unravels everything: Brexit is voidable and Article 50 can be revoked

The allegations of overspending and corruption surrounding Vote Leave’s campaign are a good enough reason to declare the 2016 referendum void, argues Ewan McGaughey and explains the relevant law. He concludes that the greater a vote’s impact, the greater must be its integrity; but there is a bigger question to consider: whether we want to redo the referendum, until […]

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    How will Brexit affect the social security rights of EU migrants in the UK, and how the social protection of EU staff?

How will Brexit affect the social security rights of EU migrants in the UK, and how the social protection of EU staff?

Linda Hantrais focuses on two ways in which social security provisions may be affected by Brexit: the social security rights of EU migrants to the UK, where EU institutions have come to play an important coordinating role; and, the social protection rights of British officials working for EU institutions, where benefits and employers’ contributions are paid from the EU […]

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    What was wrong with the Brexit referendum and what would be wrong with a second

What was wrong with the Brexit referendum and what would be wrong with a second

Depending on their design, referendums can be bad for democracy, writes Joseph Lacey. He argues that the central problem with the Brexit referendum was its ad hoc nature. Any second referendum would be of a similar sort and so should be avoided. But there is a way of legitimately deciding upon questions of EU membership: through the mandatory referendum.

A […]

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    Sinn Fein won’t drop its abstentionist policy over Brexit – and that’s not necessarily a bad thing

Sinn Fein won’t drop its abstentionist policy over Brexit – and that’s not necessarily a bad thing

Sean Swan provides a brief history of how Sinn Fein came to adopt its abstentionist policy and explains why it will not change a century-long stance to help defeat Brexit in Westminster. He writes that if they were to drop abstentionism, dissident republican organisations would gain support, to the detriment of the peace process. At the same time, were […]