Brexit

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    Immigration policy will be the test of Theresa May’s “shared society”

Immigration policy will be the test of Theresa May’s “shared society”

The Prime Minister has a vision for a “shared society”. Yet, the Brexit vote revealed that large sections of the population have a vision for an old order. Tony Hockley writes that in this context, the government’s immigration policy is critical. He sees Brexit as an opportunity to shift norms of local identity, and draws on the Conservative Party’s […]

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    How Article 127 of the EEA Agreement could keep the UK in the single market

How Article 127 of the EEA Agreement could keep the UK in the single market

Much of the discussion around Brexit has focused on when the UK will formally trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty and begin the process for leaving the EU. As Gavin Barrett writes, however, the procedure for leaving the single market is potentially more complex due to the UK’s participation in the European Economic Area, which has its own […]

January 7th, 2017|Brexit, Featured|6 Comments|

Brexit, red lines, and the EU: the two-level game revisited

With the UK expected to trigger Article 50 by March, how successful is the country likely to be in securing a favourable exit deal from the EU? Bob Hancké writes that there are two major problems for the UK in its negotiation: that the rules of the game, as established by Article 50, are skewed toward the interests of […]

January 3rd, 2017|Brexit, Featured|8 Comments|

Brexit, inequality and the demographic divide

A great deal of research has already been conducted on why the UK voted to leave the EU and which groups of voters were most likely to back leave and remain. Danny Dorling, Ben Stuart and Joshua Stubbs present a comprehensive analysis of the vote, writing that although there is generally a stark age divide amongst voters concerning the […]

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    Demography, education, and economic structure: The fundamental factors behind the Brexit vote

Demography, education, and economic structure: The fundamental factors behind the Brexit vote

The Brexit vote is widely seen as a watershed moment in British history and European integration. Sascha O. Becker, Thiemo Fetzer and Dennis Novy analyse the Brexit vote across the 380 local authority areas in the UK, and explain why some areas vote to leave the EU, and others voted to remain.

The UK referendum on EU membership on 23 […]

December 3rd, 2016|Brexit, Featured|1 Comment|

The Brexit-Trump Syndrome: it’s the economics, stupid

For decades, investment has been falling, living standards have declined, and inequality has risen. What the Brexit and Trump campaigns shared was that they exploited the resulting disaffection by blaming those problems on external forces, including globalisation. Yet these problems were not the inevitable results of globalisation, but of domestic policy choices, influenced by flawed economic theories. Michael Jacobs […]

Brexit and the Gordian knot of the UK productivity puzzle

Economic uncertainty following the EU referendum, as well as additional political uncertainty stemming from the recent High Court decision to allow Parliament to vote on the deal, might delay the government’s preferred timing for triggering Article 50 by March 2017. There is therefore potential for fuelling investment uncertainty and delaying a steady recovery in UK productivity, explain Michael Ellington […]

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    Remain means remain: Nicola Sturgeon cannot be ignored on Brexit

Remain means remain: Nicola Sturgeon cannot be ignored on Brexit

Leave won the vote by a small margin, yet no question in a mature liberal democracy is answered fully by a referendum: the debate continues. Theresa May needs to acknowledge that as Brexit means Brexit for England and Wales, the opposite is true for Scotland and Northern Ireland, writes Andrew Scott Crines.

The recent meeting between Prime Minister Theresa May […]

November 2nd, 2016|Brexit, Featured|20 Comments|
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.