Brexit

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    Fraud unravels everything: Brexit is voidable and Article 50 can be revoked

Fraud unravels everything: Brexit is voidable and Article 50 can be revoked

The allegations of overspending and corruption surrounding Vote Leave’s campaign are a good enough reason to declare the 2016 referendum void, argues Ewan McGaughey and explains the relevant law. He concludes that the greater a vote’s impact, the greater must be its integrity; but there is a bigger question to consider: whether we want to redo the referendum, until […]

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    How will Brexit affect the social security rights of EU migrants in the UK, and how the social protection of EU staff?

How will Brexit affect the social security rights of EU migrants in the UK, and how the social protection of EU staff?

Linda Hantrais focuses on two ways in which social security provisions may be affected by Brexit: the social security rights of EU migrants to the UK, where EU institutions have come to play an important coordinating role; and, the social protection rights of British officials working for EU institutions, where benefits and employers’ contributions are paid from the EU […]

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    What was wrong with the Brexit referendum and what would be wrong with a second

What was wrong with the Brexit referendum and what would be wrong with a second

Depending on their design, referendums can be bad for democracy, writes Joseph Lacey. He argues that the central problem with the Brexit referendum was its ad hoc nature. Any second referendum would be of a similar sort and so should be avoided. But there is a way of legitimately deciding upon questions of EU membership: through the mandatory referendum.

A […]

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    Sinn Fein won’t drop its abstentionist policy over Brexit – and that’s not necessarily a bad thing

Sinn Fein won’t drop its abstentionist policy over Brexit – and that’s not necessarily a bad thing

Sean Swan provides a brief history of how Sinn Fein came to adopt its abstentionist policy and explains why it will not change a century-long stance to help defeat Brexit in Westminster. He writes that if they were to drop abstentionism, dissident republican organisations would gain support, to the detriment of the peace process. At the same time, were […]

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    A coercive policy-making state? How the EU is alienating its citizens

A coercive policy-making state? How the EU is alienating its citizens

The remit of EU institutions has expanded inexorably, writes Jeremy Richardson, all while their policy-making style has shifted from a consensus-based process towards a more coercive, top-down one. At the same time, the EU’s focus on interest groups might have also exacerbated the problem of the democratic deficit by distancing the EU from broader public opinion. These realities have […]

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    Agriculture post-Brexit: a battleground for the UK’s constituent nations

Agriculture post-Brexit: a battleground for the UK’s constituent nations

Agriculture is a devolved matter which is also subject to EU policy-making. Micheal Keating writes that while there is agreement on the need for UK-wide frameworks to govern certain areas of agriculture post-Brexit, there is currently no agreement among the UK’s nations on what form they should take. He argues that funding will likely be cut and that the […]

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    UK governance after Brexit: yet more variable and even more disjointed

UK governance after Brexit: yet more variable and even more disjointed

Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon write that, although May’s government has been prepared to make various concessions in its dealings with the devolved governments, tricky intergovernmental negotiations relating to Brexit are in line. How these will be managed will be one of the most difficult aspects of the Brexit process.

Cabinet Office minister David Lidington recently delivered (to little […]

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    What could Brexit mean for UK public spending and devolved government relations?

What could Brexit mean for UK public spending and devolved government relations?

In the London-centric world of our national media, little consideration has been given to what Brexit means for UK public spending and for devolved government relations. David Heald outlines some of the long-term issues that are being neglected, and explains their importance.

What is remarkable about the public discussion on Brexit since the 2016 Referendum is that it has consistently focused […]