Economy and Society

Assessing David Cameron’s legacy

David Cameron’s political career was cut short by last year’s dramatic Brexit vote. Chris Byrne, Nick Randall and Kevin Theakston look back on his time in office, and how the history books will judge him. 

For David Cameron 2017 will be a year of ‘exciting new challenges’. Chief among these will be joining the after dinner speaking circuit of former prime ministers and […]

Do migrant children have political agency?

This issue of migration has not been far from the headlines over the past two years. In the movement to Europe, migrant children have been especially vulnerable. Here Jacob Lind explores how migrant children react to the paradox of holding two seemingly contradictory subject positions at once: the (deserving) child and the (undeserving) migrant.

Children’s position as specific right-bearers was […]

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    Do economists change the financial system, or does the financial system change economists?

Do economists change the financial system, or does the financial system change economists?

How does received knowledge vis-a-vis our financial system emerge and change? Here, Michael Lee explores how ideas about the economy have come into existence and gained acceptance in contemporary UK and US economic thinking.

Imagine a world where Milton Friedman received more encouragement in art, and less in math as a child. Young Milton might have become an artist instead […]

The end of austerity? Not for the most needy

The Chancellor’s 2016 Autumn Statement spoke of the ‘end of austerity’. It also announced the government’s aim to do more for those who are ‘just about managing’. Amidst all this, one might easily miss the crucial fact that austerity has just dramatically intensified for one particularly vulnerable group of people, write Alice Forbess and Deborah James.

Just before announcing that […]

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    The case for a European minimum income scheme for jobseekers

The case for a European minimum income scheme for jobseekers

On 13 December, the European Commission put forward a proposal to change the way EU citizens can access social benefits in other EU countries. Cecilia Bruzelius and Martin Seeleib-Kaiser argue that the proposal fails to address key weaknesses in the existing system and should be complemented by a European Minimum Income Scheme that is available to all mobile jobseekers.

The […]

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    Increasing the number of faith schools could also increase social segregation and lower social mobility

Increasing the number of faith schools could also increase social segregation and lower social mobility

Faith schools generally achieve better exam results than their counterparts. But how much of this success is down to their intake? Rebecca Johnes and Jon Andrews find that much of the difference can be attributed to social selection: faith schools on average admit fewer pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds than non-faith schools. Increasing the number of faith schools could therefore increase social […]

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    Insecure workers and protection: the case for cautious optimism about 2017

Insecure workers and protection: the case for cautious optimism about 2017

The quality, security, and dignity of work  all were brought into the public debate in 2016. This attention has created an opportunity: 2017 could see key changes that help secure at least some advances for labour, explains Gavin Kelly.

We can say with a depressing degree of confidence that 2017 isn’t going to be a good year for workers’ wages. […]

Brexit, inequality and the demographic divide

A great deal of research has already been conducted on why the UK voted to leave the EU and which groups of voters were most likely to back leave and remain. Danny Dorling, Ben Stuart and Joshua Stubbs present a comprehensive analysis of the vote, writing that although there is generally a stark age divide amongst voters concerning the […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.