Economy and Society

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    Modern slave or illegal worker? The haze around modern slavery and its implications

Modern slave or illegal worker? The haze around modern slavery and its implications

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 has been far from a solution to the problem of worker exploitation. Candice Morgan explains how the Act is flawed in its application, and why much of the ineffectiveness comes down to how ‘modern slavery’ is being represented.

When you hear the term ‘modern slavery’, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Sex-workers? Domestic […]

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    What a fairer tuition fees system would look like and how it may be achieved

What a fairer tuition fees system would look like and how it may be achieved

Carl Cullinane explains why a system of stepped fees and restored maintenance grants would reduce average levels of debt, and target resources at those from low-income households who need it the most, at a more moderate cost to the taxpayer.

Since university tuition fees were introduced in 1998, the issue has become a political flashpoint for successive governments, and Theresa […]

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    Women on company boards: time for the government to adopt legislative quotas

Women on company boards: time for the government to adopt legislative quotas

The UK’s voluntary approach towards gender equality on company boards has so far yielded results that are neither encouraging nor satisfactory, writes Giovanni Razzu. He reviews the situation and explains why the government must reconsider its approach.

The European Institute of Gender Equality has recently released the update to the Gender Equality Index, which showed no progress in many areas […]

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    Why the Bank of England should change how it publishes the future path of interest rates

Why the Bank of England should change how it publishes the future path of interest rates

The Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee should revisit the issue of publishing its own future path of interest rates, argue Michael Ellington and Costas Milas. They review the current process and explain why it is not very effective.

It was widely expected and indeed happened. The Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) decided, by a 7-2 majority, to […]

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    The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

Since the referendum, UK inflation has risen faster than that of the Eurozone. Price rises have varied across sectors, but Josh De Lyon, Swati Dhingra, and Stephen Machin show that the rise in the growth rate of food prices has been particularly pronounced. As a result, real wage growth in the UK has again turned negative. 

The pattern of significantly higher price inflation […]

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    How politicians created, rather than reacted to, negative public opinion on benefits

How politicians created, rather than reacted to, negative public opinion on benefits

Using House of Commons speeches on welfare from the late 1980s to 2015, Tom O’Grady finds that declining support for the benefits system was a top-down phenomenon. Shifts in political rhetoric – especially from Labour – did not occur after public opinion changed, but took place slightly before the public was changing its mind about benefits. 

As Theresa May’s government […]

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    The sexual harassment merry-go-round: what we know about Britain’s under-reported problem

The sexual harassment merry-go-round: what we know about Britain’s under-reported problem

In light of the resignation of Michael Fallon, and the various other allegations that have emerged about public figures, Jennifer Brown looks at the evidence and discusses why sexual harassment seems to be a perpetual feature of our culture.

Sir Michael Fallon was the first Parliamentarian to fall on his sword in the wake of the emerging sexual harassment scandal […]

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    How longitudinal analysis helps us understand why the younger generation’s living standards are faltering

How longitudinal analysis helps us understand why the younger generation’s living standards are faltering

Younger generations are currently experiencing work uncertainty, slower pay progression, and are finding it more difficult to own a house compared to their predecessors. Lord David Willetts explains how longitudinal analysis helps us expand our understanding of intergenerational differences and where policy to address these might focus. 

When I wrote The Pinch seven years ago it was the first book […]