Economy and Society

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    Rebuilding a thriving London: How the Blitz enhanced the capital’s economy

Rebuilding a thriving London: How the Blitz enhanced the capital’s economy

In order to rebuild itself after the devastating attacks of the Luftwaffe during 1940 and 1941, London adopted a more flexible planning regime, leading to an extremely positive and lasting effect on the capital’s present day economy, explain Gerard Dericks and Hans Koster.

The Blitz lasted from Sept 1940 to May 1941, during which the Luftwaffe dropped 18,291 tons of […]

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    Making artificial intelligence socially just: why the current focus on ethics is not enough

Making artificial intelligence socially just: why the current focus on ethics is not enough

We are in the midst of an unprecedented surge of investment into artificial intelligence (AI) research and applications. Within that, discussions about ‘ethics’ are taking centre stage to offset some of the potentially negative impacts of AI on society. Mona Sloane writes that to achieve a sustainable shift towards such fields, we need a more holistic approach to the […]

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    Social care and the NHS: how to change the framework of joint working

Social care and the NHS: how to change the framework of joint working

The NHS and social care systems are turning 70, and for almost as long as they have existed, there have been attempts to join up the services and improve coordination. Despite multiple reorganisations, however, efforts have had limited success. Melanie Henwood explains what the conclusions and recommendations of new analysis by the Care Quality Commission tell us about operating […]

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    The data imaginary: six reasons why data analytics have become so powerful

The data imaginary: six reasons why data analytics have become so powerful

We are living in an era in which we are defined by our data. But how have data analytics come to be so readily integrated into so much of the social world? Dave Beer draws on his new book and outlines six ways in which the industry presents a series of problems and inadequacies to which data analytics are […]

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    Understanding fiscal politics in times of austerity: tax linkages in Britain and France

Understanding fiscal politics in times of austerity: tax linkages in Britain and France

Why do national fiscal pathways diverge in times of austerity? Since the late 1970s, most of the OECD countries have either responded to such episodes by cutting spending and keeping taxes low, or by increasing taxes to match growing public spending. The UK and France are two striking examples of this divergence. Zbigniew Truchlewski explains how tax linkages can […]

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    England’s qualifications gap and its solutions: evidence from the West Midlands

England’s qualifications gap and its solutions: evidence from the West Midlands

There is currently a significant mismatch between the supply and demand for skills at the regional level, write John R. Bryson, Anne Green, Simon Collinson, and Deniz Sevinc. They focus on the qualifications gap in the West Midlands and explain that the solution requires an integrated strategy, addressing housing, skills, and employment issues.

Given that the Brexit negotiations are far […]

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    The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: how nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: how nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

For many Britons, everything was better in the past. Sophia Gaston writes that this is partly because governments have not always been successful at guiding citizens through times of social and economic change. She examines nostalgia as a political force in Britain and explains why politicians must address, rather than avoid questions about patriotism and identity.

The study of nostalgia […]

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    Inflated figures, inflated opposition: how claims about welfare benefit levels affect public opinion

Inflated figures, inflated opposition: how claims about welfare benefit levels affect public opinion

Politicians, journalists, and think tanks frequently try to put a number on just how much welfare recipients receive in benefits – often massaging the figures in the process. But do exaggerated claims about benefit amounts really change anybody’s mind about welfare overall? New research by Carsten Jensen and Anthony Kevins confirms that they indeed do.

If you follow politics, or even just […]