Electoral and constitutional reform

Is David Cameron actually seeking to destroy the Lords?

Last weeks’s new peerage appointments attracted almost universal criticism for further adding to the inexorable growth in size of the House of Lords under David Cameron. But could the gradual erosion of the Lords’ reputation actually benefit the government by weakening parliament? Might it even be a deliberate plan? And – given that the Prime Minister holds all the […]

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    Human rights: the forgotten dimension of the English Votes for English Laws debate

Human rights: the forgotten dimension of the English Votes for English Laws debate

The European Convention on Human Rights applies differently to the primary legislation of the UK Parliament compared with the primary legilsation of the devolved administrations. Steffan Evans argues that this is a difference that has largely been overlooked during the English Votes for English Laws debate and uses the Government’s proposals to extend the “right to buy” to housing […]

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    Unelected upper chambers can play a legitimate democratic role in wider political systems

Unelected upper chambers can play a legitimate democratic role in wider political systems

While the UK House of Lords may be unelected and unrepresentative, consisting largely of very old white men who claim a lot in expenses and do very little, there are nevertheless good reasons for thinking that a fully-elected replacement might not be the best way forward. Conor Farrington explains.

The House of Lords is under fire again. The Electoral Reform Society has released a report claiming […]

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    The Government has been defeated 10 times in the House of Lords since the election: could this be the new parliamentary reality?

The Government has been defeated 10 times in the House of Lords since the election: could this be the new parliamentary reality?

At the 2015 General Election in May, the Conservative Party won a majority in the House of Commons. However, they are far from having one in the House of Lords, which has a very different composition. Here, Hannah White considers the significance of recent defeats in the House of Lords at the start of the new parliament for how the […]

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    A road map for pluralistic and ‘asymmetric’ devolution in the UK

A road map for pluralistic and ‘asymmetric’ devolution in the UK

Devolution to a model set out by the centre is not devolution at all, writes Jonathan Carr-West. We need local authorities and groups of local authorities in cities and counties to come forward with detailed and realistic proposals on how they plan to grow their local economies and improve local services and what powers they need to achieve this.
Devolution […]

The UK is at a constitutional crossroads

The piecemeal, ad hoc approach to devolution is creating serious constitutional difficulties beyond Scotland. A more systematic view, considering the UK as a whole, is required. In this article, Alan Trench sets out the recommendations of a new report aimed at just that.

The impact of the Scottish independence referendum has been wide-ranging. It raises a number of questions about how […]

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    Is a British Senate any closer now? Or will the House of Lords still go on and on?

Is a British Senate any closer now? Or will the House of Lords still go on and on?

Labour enters the 2015 election pledged to make creating a British Senate a key part of a new Constitutional Convention. The SNP surge in Scotland gives much greater urgency to the idea, since a new upper House could be one of the most important components for re-binding together a fully federal UK. Richard Reid and Patrick Dunleavy read the runes on a century-old […]

Could electoral reform really happen?

Could the results of today’s general election really lead to change in the electoral system? Many commentators seem to think yes. Alan Renwick here offers some reason for caution.

Lots of people are suddenly talking about electoral reform. Never mind that the British electorate voted by 68 per cent to 32 per cent in a referendum in 2011 against dropping First Past […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.