Electoral and constitutional reform

  • democracy_now
    Permalink Gallery

    What Labour must do to win in 2020: an electoral reform pact

What Labour must do to win in 2020: an electoral reform pact

Nat le Roux argues that a one-off electoral reform pact between Labour and some or all of the minor parties in 2020, with a common manifesto commitment to introduce a new voting system, would likely result in a broad-left coalition government. Otherwise Labour may spend a generation in opposition.

The political commentariat comprehensively failed to predict either the Conservative victory […]

  • lnd
    Permalink Gallery

    The Tax Credits dispute illustrates both the need for Lords reform, and why it is unlikely to happen any time soon

The Tax Credits dispute illustrates both the need for Lords reform, and why it is unlikely to happen any time soon

The Government is currently in conflict with the House of Lords over reform of Tax Credits, with at one point the possibility of a Lords ‘shutdown’ being inflicted by the Government. Stephen Barber argues that the conflict shows precisely why the Lords needs reform, but also shows why it is unlikely to happen any time soon.

 

The policy might be […]

  • houseoflords
    Permalink Gallery

    The Conservatives will not ‘suspend’ the House of Lords, but neither will they reform it

The Conservatives will not ‘suspend’ the House of Lords, but neither will they reform it

The government’s plans to cut tax credits might just be threatened with a ‘fatal motion’ in the House of Lords next week. Unnamed ministers have threatened peers in turn with suspension. Richard Reid explains how the Lords can get involved in statutory instruments. He argues that this is another case where peers must walk a fine line between being neither a government ‘lap-dog’ […]

  • osborne northern powerhouse
    Permalink Gallery

    The devolution of public services requires better governance systems than currently proposed

The devolution of public services requires better governance systems than currently proposed

The Government is doing deals with combined authorities in England which will see responsibility for services costing billions of pounds devolved to a more local level. But what governance systems are being put in place to manage this transfer of power? Ed Hammond explores some of the issues surrounding the Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill, currently progressing through Parliament, […]

  • Bridge over Tweed
    Permalink Gallery

    In order to sustain itself, the UK must become a new and different Union

In order to sustain itself, the UK must become a new and different Union

Jim Gallagher reflects on what the Scotland Bill tells us about the Scotland-UK relationship and devolution more broadly. He argues that the Bill presents a challenge to the unwritten constitution, and that now is the time to clarify and codify the territorial aspects to make a statement about how and why the Union hangs together.

The Scotland Bill calls […]

Is David Cameron actually seeking to destroy the Lords?

Last weeks’s new peerage appointments attracted almost universal criticism for further adding to the inexorable growth in size of the House of Lords under David Cameron. But could the gradual erosion of the Lords’ reputation actually benefit the government by weakening parliament? Might it even be a deliberate plan? And – given that the Prime Minister holds all the […]

  • Brit and Engl flags
    Permalink Gallery

    Human rights: the forgotten dimension of the English Votes for English Laws debate

Human rights: the forgotten dimension of the English Votes for English Laws debate

The European Convention on Human Rights applies differently to the primary legislation of the UK Parliament compared with the primary legilsation of the devolved administrations. Steffan Evans argues that this is a difference that has largely been overlooked during the English Votes for English Laws debate and uses the Government’s proposals to extend the “right to buy” to housing […]

  • House of Lords
    Permalink Gallery

    Unelected upper chambers can play a legitimate democratic role in wider political systems

Unelected upper chambers can play a legitimate democratic role in wider political systems

While the UK House of Lords may be unelected and unrepresentative, consisting largely of very old white men who claim a lot in expenses and do very little, there are nevertheless good reasons for thinking that a fully-elected replacement might not be the best way forward. Conor Farrington explains.

The House of Lords is under fire again. The Electoral Reform Society has released a report claiming […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.