Electoral and constitutional reform

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    The Government has been defeated 10 times in the House of Lords since the election: could this be the new parliamentary reality?

The Government has been defeated 10 times in the House of Lords since the election: could this be the new parliamentary reality?

At the 2015 General Election in May, the Conservative Party won a majority in the House of Commons. However, they are far from having one in the House of Lords, which has a very different composition. Here, Hannah White considers the significance of recent defeats in the House of Lords at the start of the new parliament for how the […]

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    A road map for pluralistic and ‘asymmetric’ devolution in the UK

A road map for pluralistic and ‘asymmetric’ devolution in the UK

Devolution to a model set out by the centre is not devolution at all, writes Jonathan Carr-West. We need local authorities and groups of local authorities in cities and counties to come forward with detailed and realistic proposals on how they plan to grow their local economies and improve local services and what powers they need to achieve this.
Devolution […]

The UK is at a constitutional crossroads

The piecemeal, ad hoc approach to devolution is creating serious constitutional difficulties beyond Scotland. A more systematic view, considering the UK as a whole, is required. In this article, Alan Trench sets out the recommendations of a new report aimed at just that.

The impact of the Scottish independence referendum has been wide-ranging. It raises a number of questions about how […]

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    Is a British Senate any closer now? Or will the House of Lords still go on and on?

Is a British Senate any closer now? Or will the House of Lords still go on and on?

Labour enters the 2015 election pledged to make creating a British Senate a key part of a new Constitutional Convention. The SNP surge in Scotland gives much greater urgency to the idea, since a new upper House could be one of the most important components for re-binding together a fully federal UK. Richard Reid and Patrick Dunleavy read the runes on a century-old […]

Could electoral reform really happen?

Could the results of today’s general election really lead to change in the electoral system? Many commentators seem to think yes. Alan Renwick here offers some reason for caution.

Lots of people are suddenly talking about electoral reform. Never mind that the British electorate voted by 68 per cent to 32 per cent in a referendum in 2011 against dropping First Past […]

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    Party manifestos fail to offer clear commitments on the redrawing of Parliamentary boundaries

Party manifestos fail to offer clear commitments on the redrawing of Parliamentary boundaries

Will the rules for the redistribution of Parliamentary constituencies be changed by the next government – as recommended by a House of Commons Committee? Or will another disruptive exercise reducing the number of MPs begin within a year of the 2015 election, as currently scheduled? As Ron Johnston, David Rossiter and Charles Pattie show, there are no clear commitments in the […]

We need clarity about the 2015 election

The 2015 election is one of the most unpredictable in decades. But this week’s dissolution of parliament was the most predictable event of the year and still large parts of the media got it wrong. This does not bode well for how the post-election period will be reported. In this article and a new report, Akash Paun corrects some of the main misconceptions.

Under […]

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    Understanding the institutional roots of persistent policy problems in the UK

Understanding the institutional roots of persistent policy problems in the UK

The UK is facing a number of structural weaknesses that threaten future growth and productivity. Tackling those structural weaknesses requires looking at the institutions, processes and incentives that underpin the formulation of policy, writes Miguel Coelho. His research finds that the performance of the UK Westminster model is, in some respects and compared to some other countries, disappointing, and that the outlook for […]