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    Do MPs’ votes in Parliament represent personal or constituency preferences?

Do MPs’ votes in Parliament represent personal or constituency preferences?

Do MPs vote to express constituents’ interests, even if such representation overrides their own personal preferences? Christopher D. Raymond explains why this may be the case and what implications it could have in trying to understand voting behaviour in divisive policy topics, like Brexit.

When studying legislative voting behaviour, most literature aims to examine how MPs’ personal views influence how […]

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    How shifts in Scottish public opinion helped the Conservatives reverse their long-term decline

How shifts in Scottish public opinion helped the Conservatives reverse their long-term decline

Kieran Wright argues that changes in Scottish public opinion since the introduction of devolution have neutralised certain features of the Scottish Conservative Party that used to be a significant electoral liability.

In marked contrast to the party’s anaemic performance in the rest of Great Britain, the Conservative Party in Scotland enjoyed its best night in decades in the 2017 general […]

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    Fighting Proud: the untold story of the gay men who served in two world wars

Fighting Proud: the untold story of the gay men who served in two world wars

Stephen Bourne draws on his latest book to tell the previously untold story of gay men who joined the British armed forces during the two world wars. Stephen will be talking about his book at a public LSE event on 27 July 2017.

“If gay men are shown to have the capacity for bravery it makes them human, heroes even. […]

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    Glass floors and slow growth: a recipe for deepening inequality and hampering social mobility

Glass floors and slow growth: a recipe for deepening inequality and hampering social mobility

Debates around inequality often focus on upward social mobility. But there is another side to the coin, write Abigail McKnight and Richard V. Reeves. Serious problems are being created by the fact that those from better-off families are protected from downward mobility, combined with slow economic growth and its impact on the creation of well-paid jobs.

Generations of British and […]

Redshift over Britain: is the Centre moving Left?

Is Jeremy Corbyn the new Centre in British politics? Ed Straw explains how years of privatisation, uncontrolled immigration, and deterioration in public services – combined with the lack of choice that comes with First Past the Post – all call for a leftward turn, and could rejuvenate the Labour Party.

Turning a signpost through 90 degrees at a crossroads in […]

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    When unpaid childcare isn’t ‘work’: EU residency rights have gendered consequences

When unpaid childcare isn’t ‘work’: EU residency rights have gendered consequences

All EU migrants are not equal when it comes to residency rights, writes Isabel Shutes. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of losing their status as ‘workers’. Brexit negotiators must […]

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    There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom – but there may be other solutions

There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom – but there may be other solutions

With its Article 50 notification, the UK also indicated that the country would be leaving the European nuclear regulator Euratom following Brexit. However, several MPs, including some prominent Leave campaigners, have criticised this position, arguing instead for the UK to have some form of associate membership of Euratom after it leaves the EU. David Phinnemore highlights that there is […]

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    UK expertise on health security could be a strong card in the Brexit negotiations – but few seem to realise

UK expertise on health security could be a strong card in the Brexit negotiations – but few seem to realise

Little public attention has been given to the impact of Brexit on management of cross-border threats within the EU and to the implications for the UK’s influence on relevant EU policy-making, explains John Connolly. He concludes that although this hasn’t been a matter for the negotiations so far, it will be good for it to be raised before […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.