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    Government has quietly published reports on the impact of child maintenance reforms. Here’s what you need to know

Government has quietly published reports on the impact of child maintenance reforms. Here’s what you need to know

With the public focus on Brexit, developments in other policy areas are going under the radar. But there might be another reason why enough publicity has not been given to DWP research on child maintenance reforms – the unfavourable evidence it reveals. Janet Allbeson explains the findings of two quantitative surveys.

Almost exactly five years ago, in the face of […]

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    Red Ellen: The Life of Ellen Wilkinson, Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist

Red Ellen: The Life of Ellen Wilkinson, Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist

In Red Ellen: The Life of Ellen Wilkinson, Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist, Laura Beers presents a dynamic account of the life of Ellen Wilkinson, a working-class girl from Manchester turned humanitarian, campaigner and politician. Beers’s book offers an insight into Wilkinson’s sometimes controversial life and a period of British history when young people from all walks of life were driven […]

February 26th, 2017|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Britain’s ‘Christian right’: seeking solace in a narrative of discrimination

Britain’s ‘Christian right’: seeking solace in a narrative of discrimination

The ‘Christian right’ in the UK may not be anywhere near as powerful as its US counterpart, but it still tries to exert influence on public policy. This has become increasingly difficult as fewer Britons identify themselves as Christian. Steven Kettell finds that although these campaigners bemoan the effects of secularisation, they have found themselves adopting secular arguments in order to oppose same-sex marriage, […]

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    Why we don’t need the alcohol industry for a strong economy

Why we don’t need the alcohol industry for a strong economy

How would the economy be affected if there was a fall in alcohol consumption? This question is particularly important ahead of the Budget, with the Chancellor deliberating over whether to raise or cut alcohol duty. Drawing on new research, Aveek Bhattacharya explains why reducing consumption will actually be good for the economy.

In 1850, the French economist Frederic Bastiat […]

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    Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Public, media, and government discussions on welfare are dominated by the notion that the population is divided into those who benefit from the welfare state and those who pay into it, despite the evidence painting a rather different picture. John Hills draws on the revised edition of his book Good Times, Bad Times to explain some of the implications […]

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    Manchester’s transformation over the past 25 years: why we need a reset of city region policy

Manchester’s transformation over the past 25 years: why we need a reset of city region policy

Since the abolition of Manchester’s city region government by Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s, councillors and officers have been sponsoring the transformation of the city by private property developers. Peter Folkman, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, John Tomaney and Karel Williams explain the unrecognised and unintended consequences of this transformation.

Manchester has been at the centre of claims about an urban […]

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    Are political statecraft and populism compatible? Lessons from Corbyn and Trump

Are political statecraft and populism compatible? Lessons from Corbyn and Trump

Although Jeremy Corbyn and Donald Trump share no common ideological ground, as political strategists they both reject the political establishment and the rules of traditional statesmanship. Kingsley Purdam, Dave Richards, and Nick Turnbull draw on Jim Bulpitt’s statecraft theory to argue that, in the long-run, the imperative for sound statecraft will win out over temporary populism.

How many members of […]

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    The New Elizabethan Age: Culture, Society and National Identity after World War II

The New Elizabethan Age: Culture, Society and National Identity after World War II

In The New Elizabethan Age: Culture, Society and National Identity after World War II, editors Irene Morra and Rob Gossedge bring together contributors to explore the emergence of a cultural ‘new Elizabethanism’ following the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II at the start of the 1950s, which drew upon the historical example of the Elizabethans to express and channel a […]

February 19th, 2017|Book Reviews, Featured|2 Comments|
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.