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Employers’ Organisations: a continuing force in the UK?

Leon Gooberman and Marco Hauptmeier explain how Employers’ Organisations – an underestimated actor within the world of work – deliver benefits to their members, represent employers in the political process, and play an important role in UK employment relations.

The importance of unions within employment relations is well recognised, but less is known about Employers’ Organisations (EOs). But this was […]

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    Book Review: How to be an Academic Superhero: Establishing and Sustaining a Successful Career in the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities

Book Review: How to be an Academic Superhero: Establishing and Sustaining a Successful Career in the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities

In How to be an Academic Superhero: Establishing and Sustaining a Successful Career in the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities, Iain Hay offers a guide to how early career academics can develop their careers while meeting the ever-growing expectations of universities. While the book does not overtly challenge the institutional demand for scholars to be ‘academic superheroes’ and occasionally offers contradictory […]

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    EU citizens in the UK are in a particularly weak position and need an independent authority to monitor their rights

EU citizens in the UK are in a particularly weak position and need an independent authority to monitor their rights

The Brexit Withdrawal Agreement (WA) has been unveiled, but the protection of EU citizens’ rights after Brexit is still a hotly debated topic. As things stand now, EU citizens living in Britain may risk falling into an implementation gap created by the limitations to bottom-up enforcement and the limits of international dispute settlement. Stijn Smismans argues that EU citizens in the […]

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    Understanding policy over- and underreactions in times of crisis

Understanding policy over- and underreactions in times of crisis

Not all crises are met with proportionate policies: there can sometimes be a lack of balance between the costs of a policy and the benefits that are derived from it. Moshe Maor sets out a conceptual toolbox to help understand these responses. He argues that disporportionate responses are not necessarily the result of error, but can be intentionally designed […]

How benefit sanctions push single parents further from work

Benefit sanctions encourage job-seeking behaviour, successive governments have claimed. Yet in the case of single parents, sanctions actually move parents further from work, write Sumi Rabindrakumar and Laura Dewar. They draw on Gingerbread’s research to show how parents are often penalised despite seeking work, caught out by unrealistic expectations from jobcentres and poor administration.

The government argues that benefit sanctions […]

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    How local political preferences influence public housing reform

How local political preferences influence public housing reform

José M. Alonso and Rhys Andrews explore the extent to which housing stock transfer in local authorities across England has been shaped by local political ideology. They explain that ideology plays an important role in making housing reform happen, but that local people can also be a source of resistance and of alternatives to such reform.

The Grenfell Tower fire […]

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    The spectre of automation? Three strategies to ensure automation works for the common good

The spectre of automation? Three strategies to ensure automation works for the common good

Could the consequences of automation lead to the growth of communism, as Mark Carney has warned? Mathew Lawrence writes that deep technological change opens up two divergent paths: one where technologies are managed and owned to our collective advancement against one where they deepen inequalities. He draws on IPPR research to outline three strategies that will ensure automation works for […]

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    What determines how much an MP spends on communicating with their constituents?

What determines how much an MP spends on communicating with their constituents?

Why do some MPs invest more in constituency communication than others? Using data from the Communications Allowance between 2007 and 2010, Katrin Auel and Resul Umit identify key incentives that explain this puzzle.

Everyone agrees that parliamentarians should keep in touch with the people they represent: constituents demand more of their representatives’ attention, while parties encourage their members to reach […]