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    What the EU could do to help ease the Myanmar Rohingya crisis

What the EU could do to help ease the Myanmar Rohingya crisis

Violence in Myanmar has resulted in more than 400,000 Rohingya Muslims leaving the country and seeking refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.Ludovica Marchi argues that the EU should take advantage of its good relations with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to help ease the crisis. There is potential for the EU, as an advocate of human rights, to exert […]

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    The plumage and the bird: We need to reappraise what is ‘essential’ and what ‘superfluous’ in political life

The plumage and the bird: We need to reappraise what is ‘essential’ and what ‘superfluous’ in political life

Political theories have often included frameworks that minimize the importance of some aspects of human flourishing and prioritize others. Rodney Barker takes issue with these distinctions, arguing for the fundamental importance of cultural choices and display in understanding human conduct.

At the end of the eighteenth century, the conservative Edmund Burke denounced the revolutionary regime in France and defended monarchy […]

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    How the third sector can convince people that homelessness can be tackled

How the third sector can convince people that homelessness can be tackled

The first ever large-scale study on public attitudes to homelessness has revealed that public opinion tends to overlook the relationship between homelessness and poverty in favour of a more fatalistic view that blames individual circumstances and poor choices. Lígia Teixeira writes that if we are to end homelessness once and for all, then we need the public’s support. She […]

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    Should MPs be involved in Westminster’s restoration? Yes, according to history

Should MPs be involved in Westminster’s restoration? Yes, according to history

The Palace of Westminster Restoration and Renewal Programme is faced with a fundamental question: how can the Houses of Parliament, a purpose-built building from the mid-nineteenth century, be transformed to meet modern standards? Henrik Schoenefeldt writes that, although requirements have changed, history offers an opportunity to reflect on how politicians were previously involved in the design of Parliament.

‘We shape […]

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    Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

When witnesses appear before select committees, Hansard records their words, but not their expressions. Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey analysed nonverbal behaviour in 12 economic policy committee hearings. She argues that gestures, expressions and tone may be pivotal in whether a policymaker’s arguments are accepted.
When political scientists study parliamentary behaviour, the usual focus is on votes, coalitions, floor debates and legislation itself. […]

How bad will Brexit really be for the UK?

Long-term forecasts claiming that leaving the EU with no deal on trade would be economically disastrous undermine the UK’s optimal negotiating strategy, writes Graham Gudgin. He points out significant flaws in such forecasts and shows why the estimates they table cannot be accepted as accurate.

The great majority of the economic forecasts have concluded that Brexit will damage the UK economy. […]

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    Will Brexit be another Black Wednesday for the Conservatives? Lessons from the ERM crisis

Will Brexit be another Black Wednesday for the Conservatives? Lessons from the ERM crisis

In light of the 25th anniversary of Britain’s exit from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, Jane Green and Will Jennings reflect on the damage done to the Conservatives as a result, and any lessons it could hold for the possible impacts of Brexit. They draw on their new book to illustrate how the party’s policy competence ratings over […]

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    Understanding pension obligation figures (though your boss might not want you to)

Understanding pension obligation figures (though your boss might not want you to)

Traditionally the preserve of boring articles in arcane journals, employers’ pension obligation accounts have recently featured in headline stories in mainstream media. Geoff Meeks explains the role of these accounts in an insidious redistribution of risk and wealth between employers and employees.

When the academics’ pension fund – the Universities Superannuation Scheme – reported it had a gap of £17.5billion […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.