Foreign Policy and Defence

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    For all parties involved, the Iran nuclear deal is a big win

For all parties involved, the Iran nuclear deal is a big win

On 14 July, a deal was reached between the E3+3 group of states and Iran which limits the country’s nuclear activity in exchange for the lifting of sanctions. Bryan R. Gibson argues that the deal is a win for all parties involved. He writes that resolving the Iranian nuclear question aligns perfectly with America’s strategic objectives for the region, […]

Why the UK should not bomb Syria

The government seems to be preparing the ground to expand British bombing of ISIS targets, from Iraq into Syria. But if the only good argument for doing so is to gain credit with our allies, are there really any ‘good’ reasons at all? Joe Devanny responds to a recent article by James Strong.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon’s “pitch-rolling” comments last week, seemingly […]

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    UK foreign aid: what do the British public think aid should be for?

UK foreign aid: what do the British public think aid should be for?

The British public appears to be slightly more strategic than altruistic, generally favouring national interest over need, in their attitudes towards the use of foreign aid, find Graeme Davies, Simon Lightfoot and Rob Johns.

In March 2015 with relatively little fanfare the UK became the first G7 country to pass a law formally committing the UK to maintain an aid budget […]

  • U.S. Army Spc. Justin Towe scans his area while on a mission with Iraqi army soldiers from 1st Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 4th Iraqi Army Division in Al Muradia village, Iraq, March, 13, 2007. Towe is assigned to 4th Platoon, Delta Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Andy Dunaway) (Released)
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    U-turn if you want to: Why Cameron isn’t bound to pre-election promises on defence

U-turn if you want to: Why Cameron isn’t bound to pre-election promises on defence

David Cameron could yet use the next SDSR to roll back his pre-election commitments regarding defence spending, argues James Strong. While flip-flopping can cause political embarassment, some promises are more easily broken than others, specifically when the public may not particularly care about individual commitments.

One of the problems facing the upcoming Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) is how much of it has been decided in […]

David Cameron must re-invigorate British foreign policy

The continuing success of Isis in Syria and Iraq underlines the need for a more proactive British foreign policy, argues Ranj Alaaldin. He writes that there is little to suggest what the UK stands for internationally, and that David Cameron must use the Conservatives’ election victory to re-energise Britain’s role on the global stage.

The fall of Ramadi in Iraq last week […]

  • U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters prepare to pick up and transport Soldiers for an air assault mission near Samarra, Iraq, March 3, 2007. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Molly Dzitko) (Released)
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    British foreign policy and the 2015 general election: Consensus on the continuity of a confused vision

British foreign policy and the 2015 general election: Consensus on the continuity of a confused vision

In place of a unifying foreign policy strategy or agenda, the main parties head into the general election with little to differentiate them and with little sense of long-term vision, writes Jonathan Gilmore. The main parties seem united in seeing an expanding horizon for a prosperous, globally influential Britain – a responsible, humane and internationalist power – but one which […]

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    Britain and the bomb: Surveying party supporters’ attitudes on the nuclear weapons debate

Britain and the bomb: Surveying party supporters’ attitudes on the nuclear weapons debate

With Britain’s nuclear deterrent, the Trident system, becoming an important issue in the general election campaign, Ben Clements investigates party supporters’ views over time towards nuclear weapons. He finds a general trend of declining support for Britain having her own nuclear weapons, with Conservative and UKIP supporters tending to stand apart from the other groups in holding positive views.

The general election campaign in […]

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    Foreign policy fault lines: defence spending, Trident and the EU

Foreign policy fault lines: defence spending, Trident and the EU

Foreign policy has not featured heavily in the political debates so far, but it does represent a key area of fault lines among the parties contesting the 2015 general election, says James Strong. With a high probability of a hung parliament, we can expect three issues to have a significant impact on coalition negotiations: overall defence spending, the Trident nuclear deterrent and […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.