Foreign Policy and Defence

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    Without an agreement between the party leaders there is nothing further that Britain can do for Syria

Without an agreement between the party leaders there is nothing further that Britain can do for Syria

The recent attacks on Beruit, Paris and a Russian airliner flying over the Sinai desert indicate ISIS is growing bolder and the question of Britain’s response has naturally returned to the fore. But James Strong argues that the latest international attack will change nothing about the politics of British policy in Syria due to the impasse created by Cameron […]

Partition: It’s time to recognise reality in Syria

The creation of an Alawi-minority coastal canton is a sine qua non for cutting the Gordian knot that is the Syrian conflict, argues Eric Kaufmann.

Vladimir Putin and Barack Obama emerged from talks this week predictably far apart on the question of Bashar Al-Assad’s future. Russia wants him to remain as their client, recognising him as the country’s leader. Britain […]

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    Jeremy Corbyn’s views on British defence policy lie far outside the mainstream

Jeremy Corbyn’s views on British defence policy lie far outside the mainstream

In this article, James Strong examines Jeremy Corbyn’s track record on foreign policy and defence issues. His views, particularly regarding Russia and action against ISIS, clearly place him at odds with the electorate.

The first important point to make when studying Jeremy Corbyn’s foreign and defence policy views is that no-one yet knows how far he will try to impose them on […]

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    Drone strikes and Britain’s new interpretation of international law

Drone strikes and Britain’s new interpretation of international law

Recently, the RAF used unmanned drones to strike and kill two of its citizens in Syria who had joined ISIS, adopting a similar legal position to that of the US and justifiying it as an act of self-defence. In this article, Chris Fuller reviews the complex legal position the British government has taken. 

By authorising the targeted killing of Reyaad Khan and Ruhul Amin […]

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    For all parties involved, the Iran nuclear deal is a big win

For all parties involved, the Iran nuclear deal is a big win

On 14 July, a deal was reached between the E3+3 group of states and Iran which limits the country’s nuclear activity in exchange for the lifting of sanctions. Bryan R. Gibson argues that the deal is a win for all parties involved. He writes that resolving the Iranian nuclear question aligns perfectly with America’s strategic objectives for the region, […]

Why the UK should not bomb Syria

The government seems to be preparing the ground to expand British bombing of ISIS targets, from Iraq into Syria. But if the only good argument for doing so is to gain credit with our allies, are there really any ‘good’ reasons at all? Joe Devanny responds to a recent article by James Strong.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon’s “pitch-rolling” comments last week, seemingly […]

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    UK foreign aid: what do the British public think aid should be for?

UK foreign aid: what do the British public think aid should be for?

The British public appears to be slightly more strategic than altruistic, generally favouring national interest over need, in their attitudes towards the use of foreign aid, find Graeme Davies, Simon Lightfoot and Rob Johns.

In March 2015 with relatively little fanfare the UK became the first G7 country to pass a law formally committing the UK to maintain an aid budget […]

  • U.S. Army Spc. Justin Towe scans his area while on a mission with Iraqi army soldiers from 1st Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 4th Iraqi Army Division in Al Muradia village, Iraq, March, 13, 2007. Towe is assigned to 4th Platoon, Delta Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Andy Dunaway) (Released)
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    U-turn if you want to: Why Cameron isn’t bound to pre-election promises on defence

U-turn if you want to: Why Cameron isn’t bound to pre-election promises on defence

David Cameron could yet use the next SDSR to roll back his pre-election commitments regarding defence spending, argues James Strong. While flip-flopping can cause political embarassment, some promises are more easily broken than others, specifically when the public may not particularly care about individual commitments.

One of the problems facing the upcoming Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) is how much of it has been decided in […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.