Impact

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    Activism or research communication? Research organisations could be muzzled by UK charity anti-advocacy clause

Activism or research communication? Research organisations could be muzzled by UK charity anti-advocacy clause

Think tanks and research organisations should not ignore the row that has broken out over the recent announcement by the UK government to introduce an anti-advocacy clause into all charity grants. James Georgalakis argues that this move, if fully implemented could have serious consequences for research-based charities seeking to support evidence based policy making, despite the government’s focus on research […]

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    Being trained by Twitter stats: Social media and the expanding ways we are measured in everyday life

Being trained by Twitter stats: Social media and the expanding ways we are measured in everyday life

With the wider availability of real-time analytics on social media, what do all these metrics mean for the way that we interact with each other and for how we understand and judge ourselves? David Beer argues these developments could be seen as part of the broader metricisation of society. As we respond to performance metrics in our workplaces, so too we are […]

December 4th, 2015|Featured, Impact|2 Comments|
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    The impact of academia on Parliament: 45 percent of Parliament-focused impact case studies were from social sciences

The impact of academia on Parliament: 45 percent of Parliament-focused impact case studies were from social sciences

How does academic research feed into the parliamentary process? Analysing the impact case studies of the 2014 REF, Caroline Kenny draws out potential lessons on how Parliament is currently engaging with academics, and how it might in the future. Impact case studies referring to Parliament were found in all four of the main subject panels, but 45 per cent […]

October 22nd, 2015|Featured, Impact|0 Comments|
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    Why it is too soon to know what David Willetts’ legacy will be

Why it is too soon to know what David Willetts’ legacy will be

Following David Willetts’ resignation as part of the UK government’s cabinet reshuffle, Greg Clark MP has today been announced as the new Minister for Universities and Science. Steven Jones looks at the flurry of comment taking place on Twitter about the reshuffle, the government’s higher education initiatives over the past four years, and what might prove to be the lasting legacy of […]

July 16th, 2014|Featured, Impact|0 Comments|
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    Open data sheds light on how universities are minority providers of commissioned research to government

Open data sheds light on how universities are minority providers of commissioned research to government

Anyone under the impression that universities are the dominant suppliers to government of commissioned research, advice, and knowledge, think again. Open data on government spending shows the relative dominance of other suppliers and mediators of knowledge to government – not least the private sector and think tanks. Simon Bastow presents some preliminary government-wide data.

This article was originally published on the Impact blog.

Moves towards […]

There is sufficient evidence to suggest Whitehall is leaning on researchers to produce politically useful research

The quality of scientific evidence in government heavily depends upon the independent assessment of research. Pressure from those commissioning the research may pose a threat to scientific integrity and rigorous policy-making. Edward Page reports that whilst there is strong evidence of government leaning, this leaning appears to have little systematic impact on the nature of the conclusions that researchers reach due to the presence […]

November 2nd, 2013|Impact|6 Comments|

How did the UK government manage to spoil something as good as open access?

There are still serious flaws to the UK government’s policy on open access, argues Frederick Friend, particularly in how it has prioritised a system with article processing charges (APCs) as the main vehicle for the publication of research. The recent Parliamentary BIS Committee report has recognised these flaws but it is unclear whether balanced change to the policy is afoot. Universities should […]

October 19th, 2013|Impact|0 Comments|

Confusion over how to measure mental health is taking a toll on workplace wellbeing, but new networks of expertise may help

Due to the confusion over what counts as evidence, mental health research has largely failed to make a significant impact on workplace wellbeing and employment relations practices. Elizabeth Cotton argues that in order to make a positive difference, academic research will have to involve new technologies and communication strategies aimed at helping people to improve their mental health at work. Academics […]