John Hills

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    Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Public, media, and government discussions on welfare are dominated by the notion that the population is divided into those who benefit from the welfare state and those who pay into it, despite the evidence painting a rather different picture. John Hills draws on the revised edition of his book Good Times, Bad Times to explain some of the implications […]

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    New child poverty measures could allow government to shirk its responsibilities

New child poverty measures could allow government to shirk its responsibilities

Abandoning the child poverty targets will damage the interests of disadvantaged children, and represents a significant step back in attempts to make Britain a fairer society, argue Kitty Stewart, Tania Burchardt, John Hills and Polly Vizard.
Last week the Conservative Government announced that it would be abandoning the indicators and targets in the Child Poverty Act (passed with cross-party support in […]

  • Permalink Nobel Prize Winner Professor Joseph Stiglitz speaking at the LSE International Inequalities Institute public lecture and launch of his new book entitled The Great Divide. Old Theatre, LSE Old Building on the 19th May 2015.Gallery

    The politics of inequality: Atkinson, Piketty and Stiglitz at the LSE’s International Inequalities Institute

The politics of inequality: Atkinson, Piketty and Stiglitz at the LSE’s International Inequalities Institute

The LSE’s new International Inequalities Institute has hosted three major thinkers on inequality: Tony Atkinson, Thomas Piketty and Joseph Stiglitz. In this article, Mike Savage and John Hills discuss what emerged out of these events, writing that the politics of inequality will undoubtedly become increasingly central to public debate.

It is clear that the politics of inequality and redistribution is a defining theme of […]

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    British Politicast episode 3: John Hills on the welfare myth of ‘strivers’ versus ‘skivers’

British Politicast episode 3: John Hills on the welfare myth of ‘strivers’ versus ‘skivers’

In this episode of the LSE’s British Politicast, Joel Suss talks to John Hills about his new book, Good Times, Bad Times: The Welfare Myth of Them and Us. With two-thirds of all UK public spending going towards welfare, how the money is spent is an important political debate. The myth that dominates this debate, and to some extent […]

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    The idea that there is a welfare-dependent underclass is wrong

The idea that there is a welfare-dependent underclass is wrong

A new book by John Hills explores key issues in the current debate about ‘welfare’ and the welfare state. The debate contrasts a stagnant group of people benefiting from it all with the rest who pay in and get nothing back – ‘skivers’ against ‘strivers’. John explains how, because people’s lives and circumstances change, most of us get back something at least close […]

Wealth inequalities have important consequences for people’s own lives and those of their children

While the UK is a rich and affluent nation, it is also a very unequal one. Previewing a new book written with colleagues and published today, John Hills discusses the political and economic issues raised by wealth inequalities, and how these are an important factor in inequalities of life chances. The information that their research details, and the analysis of current policies that are exacerbating inequalities may contribute to […]

Is your child going to University in a couple of years? It may be advantageous to take a few months off

Spending cuts combined with a move to more ‘localised’ decision-making has seen a move back to towards lower-level institutions designing their own means-tests. With regards to student fees, John Hills shows that the end result can be overlapping systems that are complex, very hard to compare, and that have undesirable side-effects. In all the controversy about student fees rising to £9,000 next […]

The ‘emergency’ budget – solving the UK’s problems? Or creating the basis for new crises?

This week’s budget saw the introduction of massive cuts to public sector spending, benefit reductions, lowering of corporation taxes and a rise in VAT. Five LSE experts discuss its key implications:

Is this a progressive budget?

The tax side of the budget is carefully done, but it can only work as the government intends on average, says Professor John Hills. […]