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    The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

Since the referendum, UK inflation has risen faster than that of the Eurozone. Price rises have varied across sectors, but Josh De Lyon, Swati Dhingra, and Stephen Machin show that the rise in the growth rate of food prices has been particularly pronounced. As a result, real wage growth in the UK has again turned negative. 

The pattern of significantly higher price inflation […]

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    The sexual harassment merry-go-round: what we know about Britain’s under-reported problem

The sexual harassment merry-go-round: what we know about Britain’s under-reported problem

In light of the resignation of Michael Fallon, and the various other allegations that have emerged about public figures, Jennifer Brown looks at the evidence and discusses why sexual harassment seems to be a perpetual feature of our culture.

Sir Michael Fallon was the first Parliamentarian to fall on his sword in the wake of the emerging sexual harassment scandal […]

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    On genetics and social mobility: why Toby Young’s structural inequality argument is not science

On genetics and social mobility: why Toby Young’s structural inequality argument is not science

Is intelligence determined by genetic factors? Questions such as this are regularly being debated, a recent example having been an article by Toby Young on what schools can be expected to achieve in light of scientific evidence on cognitive ability. Leon Feinstein explains what science actually says, and, most importantly, what it doesn’t say about heritability.

In October 2017 Teach […]

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    The dogged persistence of the British ‘old boy’: how private school alumni reach the elite

The dogged persistence of the British ‘old boy’: how private school alumni reach the elite

The mythical figure of the public-school ‘Old Boy’ has long had a hold on the British cultural imagination. But, as Aaron Reeves and Sam Friedman explain, alumni of elite schools continue to enjoy very real advantages in reaching the elite.

Of the fifty-four Prime Ministers elected to office in Great Britain, a staggering thirty-six (67%) were educated at one of […]

How ‘Help to Buy’ helps mainly the privileged

The Government’s pledge to extend the “Help to Buy” programme is a further mistaken investment in a policy which has had little impact on extending home ownership to lower income households, explains Bert Provan. So, the £2bn investment in “social and affordable housing” is, while welcome, wholly inadequate to meet the pressing and increasing need for low cost rented […]

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    What the EU could do to help ease the Myanmar Rohingya crisis

What the EU could do to help ease the Myanmar Rohingya crisis

Violence in Myanmar has resulted in more than 400,000 Rohingya Muslims leaving the country and seeking refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.Ludovica Marchi argues that the EU should take advantage of its good relations with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to help ease the crisis. There is potential for the EU, as an advocate of human rights, to exert […]

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    The plumage and the bird: We need to reappraise what is ‘essential’ and what ‘superfluous’ in political life

The plumage and the bird: We need to reappraise what is ‘essential’ and what ‘superfluous’ in political life

Political theories have often included frameworks that minimize the importance of some aspects of human flourishing and prioritize others. Rodney Barker takes issue with these distinctions, arguing for the fundamental importance of cultural choices and display in understanding human conduct.

At the end of the eighteenth century, the conservative Edmund Burke denounced the revolutionary regime in France and defended monarchy […]

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    Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

When witnesses appear before select committees, Hansard records their words, but not their expressions. Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey analysed nonverbal behaviour in 12 economic policy committee hearings. She argues that gestures, expressions and tone may be pivotal in whether a policymaker’s arguments are accepted.
When political scientists study parliamentary behaviour, the usual focus is on votes, coalitions, floor debates and legislation itself. […]