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    Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Public, media, and government discussions on welfare are dominated by the notion that the population is divided into those who benefit from the welfare state and those who pay into it, despite the evidence painting a rather different picture. John Hills draws on the revised edition of his book Good Times, Bad Times to explain some of the implications […]

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    Answering the age-old question: what does democracy mean to those who protest for it?

Answering the age-old question: what does democracy mean to those who protest for it?

There has long been a debate about democracy as a form of governance and whether it is in decline – Brexit and Trump have only exacerbated it. Drawing on research in four capital cities, Armine Ishkanian explains how activists view democracy. She explains why these committed and engaged citizens reject representative democracy, and the internal struggles of organisation within […]

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    There may be trouble ahead: the Civil Service in a post-truth world

There may be trouble ahead: the Civil Service in a post-truth world

What is the role of the Civil Service? Using the discourse surrounding the resignation of the UK’s Permanent Representative to the European Union, Sir Richard Mottram discusses some of the concepts associated with the civil service, and explains what broader lessons we might learn from recent events.

For a brief period at the beginning of January, the constitutional position of […]

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    Make America Cruel Again?: A pragmatic analysis of why torture does not work

Make America Cruel Again?: A pragmatic analysis of why torture does not work

Jennifer Brown reviews some of the psychological evidence challenging the assumption that torture works as an interrogation technique. In light of Donald Trump’s recent comments on the use of torture, she suggests that the moral case is more effective in persuading people to oppose torture than pragmatic arguments.

‘Does it work? Does torture work?’ and the answer was ‘Yes, absolutely’. […]

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    Immigration policy will be the test of Theresa May’s “shared society”

Immigration policy will be the test of Theresa May’s “shared society”

The Prime Minister has a vision for a “shared society”. Yet, the Brexit vote revealed that large sections of the population have a vision for an old order. Tony Hockley writes that in this context, the government’s immigration policy is critical. He sees Brexit as an opportunity to shift norms of local identity, and draws on the Conservative Party’s […]

The end of austerity? Not for the most needy

The Chancellor’s 2016 Autumn Statement spoke of the ‘end of austerity’. It also announced the government’s aim to do more for those who are ‘just about managing’. Amidst all this, one might easily miss the crucial fact that austerity has just dramatically intensified for one particularly vulnerable group of people, write Alice Forbess and Deborah James.

Just before announcing that […]

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    Can data-sharing improve public services? Lessons for Parliament

Can data-sharing improve public services? Lessons for Parliament

The Digital Economy Bill, currently passing through Parliament, includes proposals for HMRC information on benefits recipients to be shared with the Department of Energy and Climate Change, in order to identify citizens living in fuel poverty. Sharing data between government departments for policy purposes is not as straightforward, explains Edgar Whitley, and outlines some of the key issues that […]

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    A Trump presidency would present an enormous challenge for the UK-US ‘Special Relationship’

A Trump presidency would present an enormous challenge for the UK-US ‘Special Relationship’

A victory for Donald Trump would pose uncomfortable questions for Britain about the future of the UK-US relationship. Tim Oliver writes that despite similarities in Brexit and the politics of Trump’s rise, and the Lazarus quality of the relationship to return to life after being pronounced dead, Trump presents so many unknowns that the core of the relationship could […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.