LSE Comment

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    Immobility and support for Leave: Brexit was partly a reaction to change from the locally rooted

Immobility and support for Leave: Brexit was partly a reaction to change from the locally rooted

Popular explanations of the Brexit vote have centred on the division between cosmopolitan internationalists who voted Remain, and geographically-rooted individuals who voted Leave. Katy Morris, Neil Lee, and Thomas Kemeny write that residential immobility also matters. They explain why those living in their county of birth were more likely to support Leave. However, the impact of immobility was filtered […]

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    How effective is Parliament in controlling UK government and representing citizens?

How effective is Parliament in controlling UK government and representing citizens?

As part of the 2017 Audit of UK Democracy, Artemis Photiadou and Patrick Dunleavy consider how well the House of Commons functions as a legislature. Is Parliament still an effective focus of national debate and close control of the executive? And how well does the Commons function in scrutinising and passing legislation, or monitoring policy implementation?

What does democracy require for the legislature in […]

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    The blue passport is the symbol of all that the UK is giving up in the name of Brexit

The blue passport is the symbol of all that the UK is giving up in the name of Brexit

Theresa May announced that Britain will return to its blue-coloured passport in 2019. Eleanor Knott writes that blue passports are meaningful outside the EU, too. In Moldova, for example, the blue passport symbolises a world in which Moldovans were unable to travel freely. She argues that in the UK, the blue passport is the symbol of all that the country is giving up […]

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    Not 2017’s top reads: Assessing the value of academic blogging, beyond ‘hits’

Not 2017’s top reads: Assessing the value of academic blogging, beyond ‘hits’

Should the popularity of an article determine whether academics choose to blog again? In light of increasing interest in the number of times an article has been read, Artemis Photiadou explains why such information gives only part of the picture, and how it may distract from the many benefits academic blogging offers.

There is a December tradition for blogs to […]

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    Beware the new justifications for the green belt: what we need is a new approach

Beware the new justifications for the green belt: what we need is a new approach

Alan Mace looks at the justifications in the Draft London Plan for refusing to rethink the green belt. He writes that some of these justifications in the plan reflect a long history of overpromising on what delivers.

Despite the housing crisis in London, the Draft London Plan (DLP) rules out any rethinking of green belt policy, now some eighty years […]

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    The UK is still educating different classes for different functions in society

The UK is still educating different classes for different functions in society

The working classes still get less of everything in education, including respect, argues Diane Reay. She suggests that in order to move towards a fairer educational system, the UK needs to implement a National Education Service that provides the same standards and level of resources to all children, regardless of class and ethnic background.

Historically, the English educational system has educated […]

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    Time to reconsider the Budget rules and avoid “fiscal illusions”

Time to reconsider the Budget rules and avoid “fiscal illusions”

Following the latest Budget, it has become evident that the government’s fiscal rules are not as reassuring as intended, writes Linda Yueh. Here she analyses the announcements and forecasts, and offers a more straightforward approach to the rules that would allow for greater investment and improved productivity.

The most startling part of the 2017 Budget and the economic forecasts it […]

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    The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

Since the referendum, UK inflation has risen faster than that of the Eurozone. Price rises have varied across sectors, but Josh De Lyon, Swati Dhingra, and Stephen Machin show that the rise in the growth rate of food prices has been particularly pronounced. As a result, real wage growth in the UK has again turned negative. 

The pattern of significantly higher price inflation […]