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    Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

When witnesses appear before select committees, Hansard records their words, but not their expressions. Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey analysed nonverbal behaviour in 12 economic policy committee hearings. She argues that gestures, expressions and tone may be pivotal in whether a policymaker’s arguments are accepted.
When political scientists study parliamentary behaviour, the usual focus is on votes, coalitions, floor debates and legislation itself. […]

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    Warning: the cost of Brexit could seriously damage your health service

Warning: the cost of Brexit could seriously damage your health service

Leaving the EU would free up more money for the NHS, according to Leave campaigners. This pledge has been all but disowned – and in any case, writes Joan Costa-Font, Brexit will impose further costs on an already cash-strapped service. The biggest effect will be on wage bills, but it will also restrict choice for Britons and raise procurement costs.

Healthcare and the National […]

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    How Tenant Management Organisations have wrongly been associated with Grenfell

How Tenant Management Organisations have wrongly been associated with Grenfell

Tenant Management Organisations are small, tenant-led organisations that take on a number of landlord functions from local councils. The one managing Grenfell Tower, however, was actually an Arms Length Management Organisation – wholly owned by the council, writes Anne Power. She explains why the difference matters in light of the disaster at Grenfell.

When the Grenfell fire disaster happened, very […]

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    Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

The government’s recent paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

The most welcome aspect of the government’s policy paper on future customs arrangements is its acknowledgement of the desirability of a transition […]

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    The British are indifferent about many aspects of Brexit, and divided on several others

The British are indifferent about many aspects of Brexit, and divided on several others

Sara Hobolt and Thomas Leeper examined public opinion on various dimensions of Brexit using an innovative technique for revealing preferences. Their results suggest that while the public is largely indifferent about many aspects of the negotiations, Leave and Remain voters are divided on several key issues. 

Measuring public preferences is commonly approached through survey questionnaires, in which individuals express a […]

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    How the current political fixation with Brexit jeopardises the economy

How the current political fixation with Brexit jeopardises the economy

All of a sudden Britain has become the slowest growing of the major western economies, and there are increasing concerns about its medium-term outlook. Iain Begg writes that with both government and opposition fixated on what kind of Brexit to favour, there is a growing risk that fundamental and necessary measures to underpin the economy will be neglected.

Until well after the […]

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    Post-Brexit diplomacy: Can the UK hope to exert leverage at the UN without recourse to the EU?

Post-Brexit diplomacy: Can the UK hope to exert leverage at the UN without recourse to the EU?

When it comes to international diplomacy, the UK has benefited considerably from being part of the EU. But can it maintain its influence at the UN without an EU membership? Megan Dee and Karen E. Smith outline the challenges and opportunities in this area after Brexit.

As divorce proceedings commence, attentions around the world turn to the specifics of what the […]

The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised […]